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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In their first suggestion that a mechanical flaw might have caused a fatal jetliner crash in Colorado five months ago, accident investigators recommended yesterday inspections of the rudder controls on Boeing 737 and 727 jets.Although the investigators, from the National Transportation Safety Board, said they still had not figured out why the 737 crashed in Colorado, they said they had detected a problem that could cause the rudder to move on its own, making the plane difficult to control.
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BUSINESS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | March 8, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Inspectors at the Federal Aviation Administration warned superiors about problems with safety checks at Southwest Airlines, a powerful congressman said yesterday. But for nearly three years, he said, their concerns were ignored. Rep. James L. Oberstar, chairman of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, blasted the federal aviation watchdog for "complacency" that he said "has likely set in at the highest levels." The Minnesota Democrat said a committee investigation revealed "a pattern of regulatory abuse and widespread regulatory lapses" that allowed Southwest to continue flying aircraft that were past due for required safety checks so the airline "could conveniently schedule them for inspection without disrupting their commercial schedule."
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SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1997
BrunelSunergy, the Whitbread Round the World Race entry damaged after colliding with a whale on Sunday, will put into Brazil to have a new rudder fitted, team officials said yesterday.Paul Dielemans, project leader of the Dutch entry, said the decision to put into Recife this weekend was made to ensure the crew could race under the safest possible conditions."We can sail on with the severely damaged rudder, but it is still a long way to Cape Town and there will be more wind than what the boat is experiencing now," said Dielemans, adding that the rudder can be expected to weaken further.
NEWS
By Sylvia Adcock and Sylvia Adcock,NEWSDAY | October 27, 2004
WASHINGTON - A pilot flying the Airbus that crashed into New York City three years ago caused the tail of the plane to tear off in flight by his "unnecessary and excessive" use of the plane's rudder, the National Transportation Safety Board concluded yesterday in the culmination of an exhaustive accident investigation. The five-member board was unanimous in its finding, but members disagreed on the importance of what it found were two contributing factors in the Nov. 12, 2001, crash - a training program used by American Airlines that taught pilots to use the rudder when the plane is out of control, and the design of the rudder pedals of the Airbus 300-600 model.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 11, 1994
PITTSBURGH -- The USAir jetliner that crashed on Thursday, killing all 132 aboard, had been repeatedly inspected in recent months to make sure that it did not have a rudder problem that has caused safety concerns about the Boeing 737, a federal aviation official said yesterday.Nothing was found to be out of order in the inspections that were performed by USAir after being ordered last March for all similar planes until the manufacturers change the design of a rudder mechanism and replace the part, said Donald Riggin, the manager of the FAA office in Seattle that oversees safety rules for Boeing aircraft.
SPORTS
By Bruce Stannard and Bruce Stannard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 11, 2000
AUCKLAND, New Zealand -- As is so often the case in the America's Cup, races are lost on shore just as often as they are won on the water. Sometimes they are lost even before the boats leave the dock. Although mathematically it is still possible for Dennis Conner's Stars and Stripes to make the challenger finals, the International Jury's decision to strip the San Diego contender of one all-important point because of the use of an illegal rudder means it is likely to fall just short of the points required to make the finals.
NEWS
By SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER | February 21, 1997
SEATTLE -- The rudder systems on Boeing 737 commercial jets do not provide the same level of safety as similar passenger aircraft, the National Transportation Safety Board declared yesterday.In one of its most vocal criticisms of the world's most widely used commercial jet, the NTSB also implied that existing 737s would not meet today's federal certification standards.It called on the Federal Aviation Administration to speed plans to order newly designed rudder control systems on all 737s.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1999
SPRINGFIELD, Va. -- Federal investigators probing a 1994 USAir crash that killed 132 cast doubt on the safety of the world's most widely used commercial aircraft yesterday, suggesting that the Boeing 737 might have a fatal design flaw.Safety experts also questioned whether design changes already ordered by the Federal Aviation Administration have worked, noting that some 737s with the modifications have still reported unexpected problems in flight.The investigation has "raised questions in many minds about the design and operation of the 737's rudder system," said Jim Hall, chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board at a hearing here on the crash.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1999
SPRINGFIELD, Va. -- The world's most popular commercial aircraft, the Boeing 737, has a design flaw in its rudder system that could cause the plane to roll uncontrollably and crash under certain conditions, federal safety officials ruled yesterday.While noting that such incidents are extremely rare, the National Transportation Safety Board recommended that all 737s in use and in production -- more than 3,000 worldwide -- be fitted with new systems to eliminate or overcome a potential rudder failure.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1999
The lives of 132 people on board USAir Flight 427 ended in a sudden, explosive nose-dive into the woods outside Pittsburgh, a routine landing gone terribly wrong.For 4 1/2 years, federal investigators have tried to determine why the Boeing 737 rolled onto its back, then spiraled to the ground, and this week the investigation should end. Government officials will consider a final report placing the blame for Flight 427's demise.That report could have an impact on more than 132 families. If it proceeds as expected, the National Transportation Safety Board could touch off a resounding tremor through the entire passenger airline industry -- labeling the world's most popular commercial aircraft a safety hazard, and demanding sweeping, expensive modifications to one of its flight control systems.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - Corrosion and faulty installation of critical parts inside the space shuttle Discovery's tail are prompting NASA to replace the equipment on all three orbiters, but the program's chief said he believes the space agency will still launch a shuttle next spring. At the same time, officials of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration say they are making major progress on some of the toughest problems exposed by the loss of the shuttle Columbia in February 2003, including how to repair the spacecraft's thermal protection system in orbit.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2003
On a hazy morning earlier this week, a 108-foot Navy ship pulled out into the Severn River with a group of jittery teen-agers at the controls. Marco N. Nelson, 18, whose prior fleet experience ran to inner-tubing on a lake in Arizona, was the vessel's conning officer - its chief lookout. He gazed starboard and saw that his ship, YP 695, was still a tad too close to the sea wall. "Left, 5 degrees rudder!" he hollered from the bridge wing. "Left, 5 degrees rudder, aye!" shouted Hunter E. Parden, the skinny adolescent at the helm.
NEWS
By R. Alonso-Zaldivar and Eric Malnic and R. Alonso-Zaldivar and Eric Malnic,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - He was described as a pilot who had "hands of silk" and "did everything by the book." Yet despite his skills, federal air safety investigators are trying to discern whether Sten Molin could have made a mistake that caused the tail to rip off American Airlines Flight 587. Co-pilot Molin, who was at the controls of the Airbus A300, was the man in the middle of this week's National Transportation Safety Board hearings on the crash. The accident last Nov. 12 killed all 260 aboard and five people on the ground in a New York neighborhood.
NEWS
By Jon Hilkevitch and Jon Hilkevitch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2002
WASHINGTON - Pilots using rudders may have unwittingly conducted potentially dangerous maneuvers to control aircraft during turbulence, but the risk became clear only after the in-flight breakup of an American Airlines jet last year, a captain at American testified yesterday while defending the carrier's training program. In the second day of a hearing on the crash of American Flight 587 in New York, the National Transportation Safety Board examined how the airline trains pilots to stabilize aircraft from lateral rolls or side-to-side movements that may place excessive stress on the tail fin. Investigators believe that a series of hard rudder movements snapped off the plane's tail assembly, but are trying to determine whether actions by the flight crew or a possible design flaw caused the disaster.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | November 22, 2001
ATLANTA - U.S. airlines flying Airbus A300s are finishing inspections of the planes' tails after the deadly Nov. 12 crash of American Airlines Flight 587 in New York, but some aerospace experts say those inspections might be too superficial to reveal hidden damage. "Surface inspections are incomplete at best," said Ronald M. Barrett, an aerospace engineer at Auburn University who specializes in composite materials. "To detect internal damage, you need more than a simple surface inspection."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2000
Joystick system offers realistic feel for flight simulators In piloting your flight simulator games on the PC, it would be difficult to find a better product than the X36 Flight Control System. Saitek's $99.95 package comes in two parts, a joystick and a throttle/rudder controller. The joystick is the primary steering device. It also has a safety switch that can be flipped down for launching missiles. The other device is for precise speed control and operating the plane's rudder. Taken together, the joystick and throttle/rudder controller are among the best available, although becoming comfortable with them might take awhile for novices.
SPORTS
October 10, 1997
Status: Day 19, Leg 1Standings:Boat .................. Nautical miles to finish1. Innovation Kvaerner ... 3,227.02. Merit Cup ............. 3,243.43. EF Language ........... 3,251.24. Silk Cut .............. 3,371.05. Chessie Racing ........ 3,396.56. Toshiba ............... 3,567.57. America's Challenge ... 3,602.48. Swedish Match ......... 3,635.89. EF Education .......... 3,809.810. BrunelSunergy ........ 3,826.0(as of 6 p.m. GMT)Boat beat: BrunelSunergy is having difficulty steering upwind, as it makes its way to Recife off the Brazilian coast to receive a new rudder.
SPORTS
May 31, 2000
Baseball Angels: Agreed to terms with SS Kevin Stocker. Braves: Placed P Greg McMichael on 15-day DL. Recalled P Don Wengert from Triple-A Richmond. Cubs: Recalled P Ruben Quevedo from Triple-A Iowa. Optioned OF Raul Gonzalez to Iowa. Diamondbacks: Placed P Todd Stottlemyre on 15-day DL with soreness in his right elbow. Recalled P Vicente Padilla from Triple-A Tucson. Indians: Assigned P Jared Camp and OF Dave Roberts to Triple-A Buffalo. Recalled 3B Russell Branyan from Buffalo. Activated OF Jolbert Cabrera from inactive list.
SPORTS
By Bruce Stannard and Bruce Stannard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 2000
AUCKLAND, New Zealand -- AmericaOne scored a nine-second win over Italy's Prada Challenge today to level the best-of-nine America's Cup challenger finals at three races apiece. In an extraordinary, seesawing race -- the closest of the series -- the inexperience of the Italian crew once again weighed against them as they wrapped their spinnaker around their rudder. This slowed and distracted them and almost certainly cost them the race. Cayard, as he did after winning the fifth race, paid tribute to his tactician, John Kostecki.
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