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Ruby Ridge

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By Sandy Grady | August 21, 1995
THE REMOTE mountain boonies of Idaho would seem a long way off the urban beat of a city-slicker U.S. senator such as Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa. But when you run for president, the campaign trail goes to strange turf.Critics say Specter's longshot quest for the presidency is luring him into the heart of the FBI's bungled 1992 shootout with white separatist Randy Weaver.After all, when Specter began his run for the Republican nomination as a national cipher, every public move would be calculated as trolling for votes.
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NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2002
As prosecutors in Anne Arundel County prepare to ask a grand jury whether an FBI agent who mistakenly shot an unarmed man should be indicted, they face a confusing legal roadmap stemming from one of the most divisive events in recent FBI history - the deadly standoff at Ruby Ridge, Idaho. When the 11-day siege at separatist Randy Weaver's cabin ended in August 1992, state prosecutors in Idaho took the rare step of bringing involuntary manslaughter charges against the FBI sharpshooter who shot and killed Weaver's wife.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Larry Potts, the former deputy director of the FBI who was ousted from his job over the deadly siege in Ruby Ridge, Idaho, gained some ground yesterday when a top Justice Department official backed him up in a dispute over the incident.Mr. Potts, who supervised the FBI operation at Ruby Ridge from the bureau's headquarters, has long denied that he approved the shoot-on-sight rules adopted for the confrontation. And yesterday, Jamie S. Gorelick, the deputy attorney general, testified at a Senate hearing on the confrontation that she believed him.Nevertheless, Mr. Potts' subordinates, among them Eugene Glenn and Dick Rogers, the bureau's two commanders at the scene, have said that it was Mr. Potts who authorized the aggressive rules that were in effect on Aug. 22, 1992.
NEWS
November 28, 2001
PRESIDENT BUSH says we are fighting terrorism to preserve our way of life -- not the least element of which is our democratic government. Trust in the laws made by our representatives prevents erosion of individual rights and domestic peace. Thus we are troubled by an executive order that could keep records of the Reagan-Bush administration out of the public domain. Those papers should be available for public inspection under a 1978 law sealing them for 12 years then making them available.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 31, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A senior FBI executive pleaded guilty yesterday to destroying an internal report critical of the agency's performance in a 1992 standoff with a white separatist at his remote Idaho cabin.The official, E. Michael Kahoe, who was chief of the violent crime and major offenders' section at the bureau's headquarters, admitted to a single felony count of obstruction of justice, an offense punishable by a maximum term of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.Judge Ricardo M. Urbina of U.S. District Court postponed sentencing pending Kahoe's cooperation with prosecutors, who are investigating whether Kahoe's superiors at the agency sought to conceal their actions after the Idaho confrontation.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2002
As prosecutors in Anne Arundel County prepare to ask a grand jury whether an FBI agent who mistakenly shot an unarmed man should be indicted, they face a confusing legal roadmap stemming from one of the most divisive events in recent FBI history - the deadly standoff at Ruby Ridge, Idaho. When the 11-day siege at separatist Randy Weaver's cabin ended in August 1992, state prosecutors in Idaho took the rare step of bringing involuntary manslaughter charges against the FBI sharpshooter who shot and killed Weaver's wife.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 18, 1996
"Ruby Ridge: An American Tragedy" -- a two-night CBS docudrama about the government shootout with white separatist Randy Weaver -- is so badly matched that each night almost seems like a different film.But running through both is an astounding performance by Academy-Award winner Laura Dern as Weaver's wife, Vicky. It is the made-for-television-movie performance of the year -- good enough to put an otherwise seriously flawed "Ruby Ridge" on the map of must-see weekend viewing.The most egregious flaws in the four-hour film, starring Randy Quaid as Weaver, are found in its handling of the social and political questions raised by and at Ruby Ridge -- the 1992 shootout that occurred when U.S. marshalls attempted to arrest Weaver at his remote mountaintop property on charges of selling guns to an undercover federal officer.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 8, 1995
Cal who?So the bomber McVeigh and neo-Nazi gun freak paranoids were right about Ruby Ridge. What does that prove?The issue is whether the voters credit the Schmoke Administration with The Streak.Mrs. Clinton went to Mongolia, where the Chinese believe she belongs.Now let's see. The Arkansas governor is off the hook because an Arkansas judge said the wrong prosecutor went after him.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 4, 1996
Wait till all those people switching to Bill find out that he is not really a Republican.If right-wing nuts were right about the FBI at Ruby Ridge, left-wing nuts deserve a hearing on the CIA in Lalaland.The third-best way to reduce rats downtown is to get rid of the ivy. The second-best way is to pick up the garbage. The best way is not to throw it.Whatever became of Jack Kemp?Pub Date: 11/04/96
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | September 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The FBI sniper who killed the wife of white separatist Randy Weaver declined to answer questions yesterday from a Senate subcommittee, invoking his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination.Senators and Justice Department officials took pains to say that FBI Agent Lon Horiuchi wanted to testify, but his attorney advised against it because of an investigation by a county prosecutor in northern Idaho."I think the Fifth Amendment is very often misunderstood," said Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 7, 1998
WHERE IS good old-fashioned conservative outrage when and where you would most expect to find it? It was abundant in the cases of David Koresh and his followers in Waco, Texas, four years ago and in the 1992 shootout in Ruby Ridge, Idaho.In early December, a story hit the news wires that the U.S. Army, after 30 years, has finally admitted spying on civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. during his last days in Memphis, Tenn. Either conservatives didn't get outraged or they didn't see the story.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 4, 1996
Wait till all those people switching to Bill find out that he is not really a Republican.If right-wing nuts were right about the FBI at Ruby Ridge, left-wing nuts deserve a hearing on the CIA in Lalaland.The third-best way to reduce rats downtown is to get rid of the ivy. The second-best way is to pick up the garbage. The best way is not to throw it.Whatever became of Jack Kemp?Pub Date: 11/04/96
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 31, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A senior FBI executive pleaded guilty yesterday to destroying an internal report critical of the agency's performance in a 1992 standoff with a white separatist at his remote Idaho cabin.The official, E. Michael Kahoe, who was chief of the violent crime and major offenders' section at the bureau's headquarters, admitted to a single felony count of obstruction of justice, an offense punishable by a maximum term of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.Judge Ricardo M. Urbina of U.S. District Court postponed sentencing pending Kahoe's cooperation with prosecutors, who are investigating whether Kahoe's superiors at the agency sought to conceal their actions after the Idaho confrontation.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1996
For the past two weeks, Dennis Franz has been proving all over again why he's one of the most powerful actors on television. On tonight's season finale of "NYPD Blue," Sipowicz struggles to hold on after the death of his son."The Simpsons" (6 p.m.-6: 30 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Jay Sherman, the Jon Lovitz-voiced star of "The Critic," is among the judges at the annual Springfield film festival."Roseanne" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Recovered from his heart attack, Dan returns home to a strict new diet and a strict taskmaster in Roseanne.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 18, 1996
"Ruby Ridge: An American Tragedy" -- a two-night CBS docudrama about the government shootout with white separatist Randy Weaver -- is so badly matched that each night almost seems like a different film.But running through both is an astounding performance by Academy-Award winner Laura Dern as Weaver's wife, Vicky. It is the made-for-television-movie performance of the year -- good enough to put an otherwise seriously flawed "Ruby Ridge" on the map of must-see weekend viewing.The most egregious flaws in the four-hour film, starring Randy Quaid as Weaver, are found in its handling of the social and political questions raised by and at Ruby Ridge -- the 1992 shootout that occurred when U.S. marshalls attempted to arrest Weaver at his remote mountaintop property on charges of selling guns to an undercover federal officer.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Against the backdrop of an intense struggle between the government and defense over evidence in the case, attorneys for Timothy J. McVeigh asked yesterday that the trial in the Oklahoma City bombing case be put off until after Labor Day to give lawyers more time to build their defense.Stephen Jones, who represents Mr. McVeigh, said that he has suggested moving the trial to Denver if the government agrees by Tuesday. He chose Denver after noting that the new federal judge assigned to the case is from there.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 15, 1995
WASHINGTON -- FBI Director Louis J. Freeh removed Larry A. Potts as his deputy director yesterday, saying that Mr. Potts is unable to perform his duties effectively because of controversy over the FBI's 1992 siege of a white separatist's house in Idaho, which left a woman dead.The transfer of Mr. Potts, 47, to the FBI's training division in Quantico, Va., was Mr. Freeh's most serious setback in his nearly two years as FBI director. He had fought for Mr. Potts' promotion to deputy director, even after censuring him in January for management failures in the Ruby Ridge, Idaho, siege.
NEWS
May 10, 1995
Attorney General Janet Reno announced last week that Larry Potts would become deputy director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Mr. Potts was not only a good choice, but, under the circumstances, the only good choice.The circumstances we mean are that the ultra right wing has been trying to block his appointment ever since FBI Director Louis Freeh made it clear in January Mr. Potts was his choice. The fringe right objects to Mr. Potts because he was in command of the siege and attack on the Branch Davidian compound at Waco, Texas, and the fatal assault on a white supremacist's cabin in Ruby Ridge, Idaho.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 24, 1995
HYDER, Ariz. -- William Marks was a prime suspect when he was hooked up to a polygraph machine and interrogated by federal agents in connection with the deadly derailment of an Amtrak train near this desert community.During hours of questioning by agents who "stared into my eyes the whole time," Mr. Marks was told that someone had implicated him in the sabotage of a trestle that sent the Sunset Limited crashing into a ravine Oct. 9, killing one person and injuring 78.He also was asked about his gun collection, night-vision rifle scope and whether he knew anyone who hated the federal government.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Larry Potts, the former deputy director of the FBI who was ousted from his job over the deadly siege in Ruby Ridge, Idaho, gained some ground yesterday when a top Justice Department official backed him up in a dispute over the incident.Mr. Potts, who supervised the FBI operation at Ruby Ridge from the bureau's headquarters, has long denied that he approved the shoot-on-sight rules adopted for the confrontation. And yesterday, Jamie S. Gorelick, the deputy attorney general, testified at a Senate hearing on the confrontation that she believed him.Nevertheless, Mr. Potts' subordinates, among them Eugene Glenn and Dick Rogers, the bureau's two commanders at the scene, have said that it was Mr. Potts who authorized the aggressive rules that were in effect on Aug. 22, 1992.
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