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By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | January 23, 1991
MOSCOW -- In a dramatic move to shore up the enfeebled ruble and undercut the shadow economy, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev last night declared 50-ruble and 100-ruble bank notes invalid as of midnight.He also ordered a limit of 500 rubles per month per person on cash withdrawals from personal savings accounts. Larger purchases will be permitted only by using checks or direct bank transfers.Citizens flocked to savings banks after the presidential decree HTC was announced on the 9 p.m. news to deposit big bills before the midnight deadline.
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NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | April 17, 2006
MOSCOW -- There's a new dirty word in Russia: dollar. In a move intended to boost confidence in the Russian ruble, the head of a Kremlin advisory group has proposed barring references to American greenbacks - and euros - in the course of official business as well as imposing fines on bureaucrats who publicly express prices in foreign currency. Yevgeny Velikhov, secretary of the Public Chamber, sent a letter to parliament last week proposing legislation that he says will help break the stereotype that the ruble is unstable and encourage Russians - and the rest of the world - to give it respect.
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NEWS
By STEVE H. HANKE and ALAN WALTERS | September 22, 1992
Russia has a long history of manufacturing and distorting economic data. Now the International Monetary Fund is lending a fig leaf of respectability to that age-old Russian exercise.This, of course, is standard IMF fare. The Wall Street Journal, noting that the IMF ''has become one of [Boris] Yeltsin's biggest cheerleaders,'' recalls that ''Often, the IMF has lavished praise upon a nation's reform process only to concede later that things went awry.''Thus Richard Erb, the IMF's deputy managing director, traveled to Moscow last month and gave the Yeltsin government's economic program a clean bill of health -- just as the ruble was taking another nosedive, plunging 18 percent against the dollar in just one week.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2005
The former treasurer of a Dundalk recreation council pleaded guilty in Baltimore County Circuit Court yesterday to stealing tens of thousands of dollars from the organization. Jody Ruble, a 34-year-old mother of three, was ordered by Judge Michael J. Finifter to repay the West Inverness Recreation Council $17,700. That restitution is in addition to nearly $10,000 she has returned to the council, the court was told. She was also placed on five years of supervised probation and ordered to perform 200 hours of community service.
NEWS
November 11, 1994
One month after "Black Tuesday" -- the day the Russian Ruble fell 24 percent -- President Boris Yeltsin's answer to the debacle has been still another purge of high government officials. There also has been dark talk that the government was a victim of conspiracy. The more compelling explanation: Stupidity.All summer long, Moscow printing presses were churning out excess rubles to satisfy demands for subsidies from near-defunct state industries, from communities established long ago by Stalin in un-viable northern reaches and, especially, from an agriculture sector that still includes too many huge and inefficient state farms.
BUSINESS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | October 12, 1994
MOSCOW -- Russia's fragile economic stability took a severe blow yesterday as the value of the ruble went into virtual collapse.The ruble fell 27 percent against the dollar in yesterday's trading, and by last night anxious government leaders were blaming greedy speculators and hinting at dark conspiracies to explain the devastating news.But others said there was no mystery at all: The ruble fell to 3,926 against the dollar, they said, because of the government's inability to control its own spending.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | April 17, 2006
MOSCOW -- There's a new dirty word in Russia: dollar. In a move intended to boost confidence in the Russian ruble, the head of a Kremlin advisory group has proposed barring references to American greenbacks - and euros - in the course of official business as well as imposing fines on bureaucrats who publicly express prices in foreign currency. Yevgeny Velikhov, secretary of the Public Chamber, sent a letter to parliament last week proposing legislation that he says will help break the stereotype that the ruble is unstable and encourage Russians - and the rest of the world - to give it respect.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | February 13, 1991
MOSCOW -- Telling a tale more outlandish than the wildest spy fiction, Soviet Prime Minister Valentin S. Pavlov said yesterday that his government had foiled a Western plot to topple the leadership of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev by dumping billions of paper rubles in the country and setting off hyperinflation."
NEWS
June 1, 1998
RUSSIAN President Boris N. Yeltsin has temporarily stopped the ruble's free fall, but even a generous bailout from the West won't be sufficient to maintain the Russian currency for long. Unless the government begins to balance its budget and starts collecting taxes, no amount of external shoring up will prevent the ruble's devaluation.The Russian government has been financing its operations by selling bonds. Creditors have grown wary that the government does not have the resources to pay the interest or the principal on the bonds.
NEWS
February 6, 1998
WHAT A difference a year makes. Twelve months ago, tough-talking former Gen. Alexander I. Lebed was a nightly attraction on Russian television. Newspapers carried his populist pronouncements daily. Now he has disappeared from center stage. So has Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky, the ultranationalist hothead renowned for his anti-Semitic buffoonery."I was born a winner. Sooner or later, victory will be mine," says Mr. Lebed, 47, who hopes to be a factor in 2000 when Russians elect a successor to President Boris N. Yeltsin.
FEATURES
By Larry Bingham | March 17, 2003
Clarksville, Tenn. - The photograph Julia Ruble keeps with her is the one she had made into a dog tag for her husband, Pfc. Jacob Ruble, to wear in Kuwait. It's a picture from their wedding day, Aug. 24. Julia wears a glittering tiara, white satin gloves and a spaghetti-strapped bridal gown that was hastily altered to fit her size-3 frame. Jacob stands inches away, in a white tuxedo, his arm around her waist in a prom-night pose. The look on their faces is blissful, naive, compared to the last picture of them together, taken 18 days ago, on the night before he was deployed.
TOPIC
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 11, 2002
MOSCOW - Though their faith in most things has been sorely tested for the past tumultuous decade, most Russians still believe in one thing: the United States dollar. Despite the bungee-jumping American stock market, many well-off Russians continue to keep their life savings in $100 bills that they squirrel away in teapots and cubbyholes. Multicolored rubles - which feature images of Peter the Great, monuments and hydroelectric plants - are the sole legal tender in most transactions here.
NEWS
December 19, 1999
The Rev. Robert Ruble, 75, First English Lutheran pastorThe Rev. Robert Blair Ruble, former pastor of First English Lutheran Church at Charles and 39th streets, died Wednesday of respiratory failure at University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 75.Mr. Ruble served at the Baltimore church from 1974 through 1982, living in the parsonage. More recently, he lived in Frederick, where he devoted much of his time to raising money for Lutheran causes.He was married for 48 years to Louise Arlene Rykhus Ruble, who survives him.Mr.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 6, 1999
MOSCOW -- Russia's lower house of parliament passed a federal budget yesterday that calls for minuscule spending, by U.S. standards, but nonetheless left international lenders cold.The budget starkly testifies as to how far the former superpower has fallen in its difficult transition to a market economy. This year's $1.7 trillion U.S. budget dwarfs Russia's planned spending -- a mere $25 billion: Russia plans to spend in a year about what the United States will spend in an average five days.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | November 6, 1998
WANT TO TAKE a quick profit after the recent rally? " 'You never go broke taking a profit' is the worst advice ever given," says Dick Davis Digest."You'll never go broke, but you'll never get rich, either. If you sell stocks after they rise 50 percent, you'll never own ones that go up 500 or 5,000 percent. Don't pull your flowers and water your weeds."Need more spendable cash? "Good income investments are those that provide more reward than risk," says Income Digest.The article selects electric utility stocks, Treasury "strips" created by bond houses which separately sell the interest coupons and the 30-year bonds stripped of them and tax-free municipal bonds.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 5, 1998
MOSCOW -- Because of its towering, glimmering-green headquarters here, Russia's sprawling and powerful natural gas monopoly came to be known to admirers and critics alike as the Emerald City.And its boss, Rem Vyakhirev, was the Wizard.Vyakhirev himself said he liked the image. Gazprom, as the company is more formally known, became a domain unto itself in post-Soviet Russia, a Land of Oz that made the mighty tremble and left plain folks in awe. It dictated to the government and vaulted Vyakhirev, a grandfatherly lover of fishing and Russian folk songs who once wanted nothing more than to run away to sea, into the ranks of the tycoons who sat at the heart of Russia's peculiar capitalism.
NEWS
January 3, 1998
AS THE KREMLIN'S bells chimed in the new year, much of Russia's population no longer could claim to be millionaires. By government order, their bank accounts and cash at hand lost the last three zeroes. Overnight, 50,000 rubles turned into 50. A ride on the Moscow Metro, which cost 2,500 rubles in 1997, suddenly could be taken for 2 rubles and 50 kopecks.In principle, this redenomination was a purely technical matter that should not affect prices. But many older Russians are skeptical. They remember how ordinary people had their savings wiped out by Communist-era money reforms, which were proclaimed only after they had been implemented.
NEWS
August 20, 1998
A STABLE RUBLE and contained inflation were long among the chief achievements of Boris N. Yeltsin's six years as post-Communist Russia's first president.Just a month ago, he used those conditions as his most potent arguments for foreign loans and credits -- and received a $22.6 billion package that was to assure economic stability. Now, the bubble has burst.Despite its vast oil reserves and other natural riches, Russia remains an insignificant player in the world's economy. Thus, the most serious impact of Monday's 34 percent devaluation of the ruble (and the effective default on billions in debt)
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 25, 1998
MOSCOW -- When the International Monetary Fund lent Russia $4.8 billion in July, Russian officials said they hoped the emergency funds would sit unspent in the Central Bank's reserves, bolstering the wobbling ruble.But within weeks of the money's arrival, economists and government critics say, it was spent on fiscal measures that provided a windfall for Russian bankers and foreign investors but did little to help the struggling economy."This tremendous sum was not spent by the Central Bank to restructure the debts and not even to pay overdue wages," said Andrei Nechayev, co-chairman of the Russian Business Round Table.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 23, 1998
MOSCOW -- All would seem right with Russia to anyone who parachuted into the World Food Moscow trade exhibition, which opened here yesterday with rows and rows of gleaming and succulent displays of edibles from around the world that no one will buy.Spilling through four large halls in a country that imported half its food last year, a show designed to bring buyers and sellers together looked for all the world like business as usual. Except for one thing -- there was no business.At the moment, there is virtually no imported food coming into Russia.
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