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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
The Anne Arundel County Council banned new rubble landfills throughout the county at its meeting Monday night, dismissing warnings from the county attorney that the measure could be challenged in court. The bill, which started as a ban on rubble landfills in residential areas but was amended to include the entire county, passed by a 7-0 vote in Annapolis. The ban would go into effect Jan. 1. Council members voted for the ban over the objections of the county executive's office and the county attorney.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
The Anne Arundel County Council banned new rubble landfills throughout the county at its meeting Monday night, dismissing warnings from the county attorney that the measure could be challenged in court. The bill, which started as a ban on rubble landfills in residential areas but was amended to include the entire county, passed by a 7-0 vote in Annapolis. The ban would go into effect Jan. 1. Council members voted for the ban over the objections of the county executive's office and the county attorney.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert | scott.calvert@baltsun.com | January 26, 2010
Monday dawned wet, gray and windy, but Ann Varghese wanted to get back to work. Needed to, she felt, after all that had happened. At 7:15, she pulled onto Charles Street and drove out to Carroll County for the first time since enduring 55 hours in a collapsed hotel in Haiti. "Hi, everybody," Varghese, 31, said cheerfully as she walked into the New Windsor offices of IMA World Health. One by one, she hugged several co-workers amid smiles and bits of laughter. Someone clapped. Hovering over the happy reunion was a yellow balloon with a big smiley face.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
For more than two decades, residents of western Anne Arundel County have fought against proposed rubble landfills that they say would bring traffic, dust and noise to their community. Now their hopes rest with the fate of a bill before the County Council that would ban such landfills from residential zones, instead relegating them to industrial areas. Several members of the County Council seemed eager to pass the bill at their last meeting, but the county's top lawyer cautioned that such a change to zoning rules comes with the risk of lawsuits.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2010
Fire crews were searching through the rubble of a building collapse on Druid Hill Avenue, but after more than an hour of searching officials said it did not appear anyone was hurt. The collapse was reported about 3:20 p.m. at a vacant two-story building in the 1800 block of Druid Hill Ave., said Chief Kevin Cartwright, a fire department spokesman. The caller said a woman had been walking by and was possibly trapped under the debris. "There's no evidence whatsoever [of a trapped person]
NEWS
December 7, 1992
For the second time in a month, Cecil County has rejected plans for a private rubble fill and recycling center for building materials. Though the application for a Perryville rubble fill, rejected last week by the county planning appeals board, may be headed for court, Cecil's citizens and officials have clearly spoken on the idea.They got, but didn't need, advice to reject it from Harford council members and from the Perryville-area state senator, William H. Amoss. (Cecil's other senator, Walter M. Baker, is a part-owner of the proposed rubble fill site.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | March 22, 1992
Here's a dump, there's a dump, there's yet another dump.That wasthe refrain at Tuesday's County Council meeting, as council members expressed their irritation at finding out earlier in the day that a proposed subdivision between Aberdeen and Riverside would be located within 300 feet of an illegal dump.As part of an update of the county's master water and sewer plan,council members were being urged by Department of Public Works administrators to give priority development status to the planned 1,600-home Hollywoods subdivision.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
For more than two decades, residents of western Anne Arundel County have fought against proposed rubble landfills that they say would bring traffic, dust and noise to their community. Now their hopes rest with the fate of a bill before the County Council that would ban such landfills from residential zones, instead relegating them to industrial areas. Several members of the County Council seemed eager to pass the bill at their last meeting, but the county's top lawyer cautioned that such a change to zoning rules comes with the risk of lawsuits.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert | scott.calvert@baltsun.com | January 15, 2010
Three senior staff members of a Carroll County-based aid organization were pulled alive from the wreckage of their hotel in Haiti after spending more than 50 hours trapped in rubble, the organization confirmed Friday morning. "We're ecstatic. That all of them were found alive in the rubble is just miraculous," said Douglas Bright, vice president of IMA World Health in New Windsor. The three are IMA president Richard Santos; Sarla Chand, vice president of international programs; and IMA Haiti program manager Ann Varghese, who lives in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Staff Writer | July 4, 1993
A state order that Spencer Sand & Gravel Inc. stop all surface mining prompted Harford County officials to investigate and cite the rubble landfill for zoning violations, an administration official said Friday.The county also is looking into possible grading violations at the 55-acre rubble fill, said Jefferson L. Blomquist, deputy attorney for the county.County zoning authorities have cited the rubble fill operator for mining outside the permitted area and for improper land filling, concrete reprocessing and top soil reprocessing, Mr. Blomquist said.
SPORTS
By Eric Meany and The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
Although it has been more than 11 years since Memorial Stadium was demolished, much of the concrete that once made up the bygone home of the Orioles, Colts and Ravens continues to host a hotbed of activity nearly 18 miles southeast of its previous location. In 2002, approximately 10,000 cubic yards of rubble from the stadium was deposited over a 6-acre site on the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay, 3 miles west of Tolchester Beach in Kent County. Every year since then, the Perry Hall chapter of the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association has organized the construction and placement of reef balls - hollow, flat-bottomed concrete blobs with holes - on a 1-acre section of the Memorial Stadium reef.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 5, 2011
Over the weekend, a demolition crew turned One, a chic night club for most of the last decade, into a pile of brick, broken cinderblock and sand. If you're of a certain age and missed One's run as a nightclub, you will know this location, at Guilford Avenue and Saratoga Street, as House of Welsh Corner. Instead of big dance floors and theatrically-lighted bars stocked with Dom Perignon, you'll think of a classic Baltimore tavern that served sizzling steaks on metal plates and Maryland whiskey at a bar without stools.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2011
For years, Danielle Oldham checked housing listings, hoping that she, her husband and their two young daughters could find a place in the Anne Arundel County community of Piney Orchard. She researched the area meticulously, scanned county development plans and talked to residents before the family finally bought a town house there in January. Then Oldham got a certified letter with some brow-furrowing news: Her dream home lies less than 1,000 feet from the site of a proposed rubble landfill.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2010
This bombardment was led by one man — a crane operator who ripped into the brick building at Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine at dawn's early light. "He's doing what the British couldn't do," park ranger Scott Sheads said jokingly about the contractor hired to demolish the structure at the fort, which defended Baltimore's harbor against the invaders during the War of 1812 and inspired Francis Scott Key to pen the poem that would become the national anthem.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2010
Baltimore police officers Cornelia Baines and Edson Musema parked their patrol car on Touchstone Court, doing routine background checks on criminal offenders in the Dutch Village apartment complex early Wednesday. It suddenly got warm. Then it rained. And then the wind came. The street lights went out. Leaves, tree branches and other debris flew toward the cruiser's windshield, plastering the front bumper. Baines watched a roof fly off a house. Parked cars spun. "I could see this dark thing spreading," Musema said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2010
Fire crews were searching through the rubble of a building collapse on Druid Hill Avenue, but after more than an hour of searching officials said it did not appear anyone was hurt. The collapse was reported about 3:20 p.m. at a vacant two-story building in the 1800 block of Druid Hill Ave., said Chief Kevin Cartwright, a fire department spokesman. The caller said a woman had been walking by and was possibly trapped under the debris. "There's no evidence whatsoever [of a trapped person]
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | January 20, 1993
Councilwoman Virginia P. Clagett last night introduced a new rubble landfill bill that incorporates changes suggested by community members, including lowering a landfill's height and shortening its hours of operation.The bill replaces a measure introduced in the County Council last month by Mrs. Clagett. Both bills incorporate suggestions from a citizens task force that studied the issue for three years.Mrs. Clagett, D-West River, said the bill recognizes the need for landfills that take in rubble generated by construction and seeks to impose environmental and operating controls that minimize annoyance to nearby residents.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Sun Staff Writer | April 9, 1995
Concerned that a controversial Abingdon rubble landfill that was closed down by the state in 1992 might become active again, residents in the area have begun to organize for battle.More than 50 people attended a public meeting in Bel Air Thursday night for an update from county lawyers on the landfill owner's appeal of a county zoning administrator's decision that it cannot resume surface mining.Spencer Sand & Gravel Inc., which operated a private dump on about 55 acres on Abingdon Road, wants to resume mining on its property.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2010
After months of negotiations, Howard County has sold the surplus former Gateway school site in Clarksville to a local couple who plan to build a green mixed-use development that could involve Kendall's Hardware next door. "We've reached another milestone — a business milestone," said George Stone, who with his wife, Holly, hopes to settle the $5 million transaction within months and submit plans to the county for processing. The sale agreement was signed May 4 and disclosed last week.
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