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By Tom Schad, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
Wade Johnstone started playing squash in his native Australia when he was 3 years old. In the 28 years since, the sport has left him exhausted, frustrated, lonely, perpetually broke - and very happy with it all. Last week, Johnstone finished his daily workout and slouched in a chair at the Bare Hills Racquet and Fitness Club in northern Baltimore, where he has been the head squash pro for more than eight years. Six white-walled squash courts with glass doors sprawled in front of him. His office, which is little more than a desk and burgundy swivel chair, sat behind him. “This is my second home,” the 31-year-old said with a laugh.
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SPORTS
By Tom Schad, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
Wade Johnstone started playing squash in his native Australia when he was 3 years old. In the 28 years since, the sport has left him exhausted, frustrated, lonely, perpetually broke - and very happy with it all. Last week, Johnstone finished his daily workout and slouched in a chair at the Bare Hills Racquet and Fitness Club in northern Baltimore, where he has been the head squash pro for more than eight years. Six white-walled squash courts with glass doors sprawled in front of him. His office, which is little more than a desk and burgundy swivel chair, sat behind him. “This is my second home,” the 31-year-old said with a laugh.
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NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
For all the centuries that handball has evolved, it remains one eccentric sport. On the East Coast, the game is typically regarded as an urban, New Yorkish thing, cheap to play outdoors. With simple rules, it is an everyman's game in the vein of stickball or basketball that arrived here in the 1800s with Irish immigrants. Yet the game's hall of fame and American governing body, the U.S. Handball Association, reside in Tucson, Ariz.. You've probably heard of handball, thanks to the movies and your neighbor's cousins from Brooklyn, but have you ever seen a match?
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
For all the centuries that handball has evolved, it remains one eccentric sport. On the East Coast, the game is typically regarded as an urban, New Yorkish thing, cheap to play outdoors. With simple rules, it is an everyman's game in the vein of stickball or basketball that arrived here in the 1800s with Irish immigrants. Yet the game's hall of fame and American governing body, the U.S. Handball Association, reside in Tucson, Ariz.. You've probably heard of handball, thanks to the movies and your neighbor's cousins from Brooklyn, but have you ever seen a match?
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | October 18, 1999
I don't much like mice because using them for years while slouched in front of a computer monitor set at the wrong angle has proven hazardous to my health. I call them rats, a reminder to avoid bad posture while computing.We have here a rat with a red taillight, perhaps the best personal computer input device to ever appear on a desktop anywhere. Gone are the tangle of springs, plastic latches and that little rubber mouse ball that picks up lint and goes awry.IntelliMouse uses laser lights to record mouse movements and thus moves the cursor about the screen.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | March 22, 2007
A black stage. A thick, white rope, sinuous and shining. A tall pole. A bright orange rubber ball. Black, white, orange. The stage lights are so bright that when the ball bounces, it casts a shadow sharp enough to cut paper. Up, down. Light, dark. Three men try to leave the stage and seemingly can't. On, off. Lost & Clown'd will be performed through Saturday at Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St. Tickets are $10-$16. Call 410-752-8558 or go to theatreproject.org.
FEATURES
By Richard Cromelin and Richard Cromelin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 21, 2003
The artist formerly known as Brody Armstrong bounces a small rubber ball on the concrete floor and laughs raucously as a pit bull named Redrum takes off in pursuit. She repeats the process, sending the ball bouncing madly off the walls, beams, instrument cases and other surfaces inside the rehearsal facility in Van Nuys, Calif. Kneeling on the floor and shouting encouragement, she seems more like a carefree youngster playing with a favorite pet than the rock world's next big thing, or at least its most controversial siren since Courtney Love.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,sun reporter | November 15, 2006
In a spacious, light-filled office high above the Inner Harbor, Ed Callahan leans back in a plastic chair, flips a fuzz-covered rubber ball from one hand to the other, and grins like a schoolboy. He has reason to feel mischievous. It's not just that the atmosphere here at Planit Agency, the Baltimore advertising firm he co-founded 14 years ago, is fun, though given the pool table in the corner, the pulsing plasma TVs along the walls and the sprightly orange color scheme throughout the place, it qualifies as that.
NEWS
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
During this week 48 years ago, Gemini 10 was launched, "Lost" actor Matthew Fox was born and people were groovin' on the following songs, via Billboard's Hot 100 chart archive. 10. "Sweet Pea," Tommy Roe One of four certified Gold records for the pop crooner. Roe's best known song, "Dizzy," would be released three years later. 9. "I Saw Her Again," the Mamas and the Papas Co-written by bandmates John Phillips and Denny Doherty, "I Saw Her Again" was reportedly inspired by Doherty's affair with Michelle Phillips, who was married to John Phillips at the time.
FEATURES
By Donna Erickson and Donna Erickson,King Features Syndicate | March 5, 1994
If weather keeps preschoolers indoors, here are some "boredom busters" to keep them busy.* Look for their baby pictures. Tell stories about the kids when they were babies. Show them your baby pictures, too.* Unravel a ball of string and wind it through your house. Have your children follow it from the starting point to a surprise snack at the end.* Gather a dozen small, familiar items such as a rubber ball, comb, sponge, apple, grape, etc. and place them in a paper bag. Ask your child to put his/her hand in the bag and try to identify each item without looking.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | October 18, 1999
I don't much like mice because using them for years while slouched in front of a computer monitor set at the wrong angle has proven hazardous to my health. I call them rats, a reminder to avoid bad posture while computing.We have here a rat with a red taillight, perhaps the best personal computer input device to ever appear on a desktop anywhere. Gone are the tangle of springs, plastic latches and that little rubber mouse ball that picks up lint and goes awry.IntelliMouse uses laser lights to record mouse movements and thus moves the cursor about the screen.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | March 20, 1994
It's easy to get your hands on a plastic tenpin bowling ball. Or a urethane ball. Or a reactive resin ball.Like to try to get hold of a rubber bowling ball? That could be a problem since it has been decades since anyone manufactured a hard rubber ball, the same material that replaced the old wooden bowling balls.But all the old hard rubber bowling balls are not in museums. If you stop in at Brunswick Normandy on a Monday when the OWLS (Older Wiser Livelier Seniors) league is bowling or a Thursday morning when the Club 55 league is in action, you can watch one being used -- with authority.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 16, 2003
The cursor has been disappearing while I browse the Internet. Any ideas as to how to stop this? I run Windows 98 with Internet Explorer 6. Let's start with the possibility that the author of a Web page wrote the underlying HTML code to make the cursor disappear when it moves over certain parts of a page. Tapping the Control key, which makes the cursor appear, usually can thwart this. Another possible issue is that your video card is making the cursor move so fast that you cannot see it. You can slow the cursor with the mouse control panel, which is reached in Windows 98 by clicking on Start, Settings and Control Panel.
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