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By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2011
Baltimore-based RTKL Associates Inc. recently beat two international rivals to win a contract to design an iconic structure for a city along the Yangtze River in China. Last winter, RTKL and two other architectural firms — one British, the other French — were invited by a real estate subsidiary of Chinese steel conglomerate Jiangsu Shagang Group to submit plans for a twin-tower, mixed-use project in Zhangjiagang, a city of about 1.5 million people 60 miles west of Shanghai. RTKL won with a design for two high-rise towers connected by an elliptical atrium.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
A Baltimore architecture firm founded in 1977 by two Park School graduates and a friend has nearly doubled in size in the last two years, making its most ambitious bid for greater reach last month when it announced the expansion of its footprint to Colorado. In two years, Hord Coplan Macht has opened an office in Alexandria, Va., wooed top talent to its ranks, and worked to merge with smaller Denver-based SlaterPaull. The growth has brought employee count at the firm — which worked on Fells Point's Union Wharf apartments, Towson University's new SECU Arena, Morgan State University's Center for the Built Environment and Infrastructure Studies and the West Shore Park, among other projects — to 180, up from about 100 just two years ago. "We didn't sit down and say, 'Let's open up an office in the Rocky Mountain region someday, but we did make a strategic decision that being 100 and some people in one region … was — not risky, but rather restrictive to us," said CEO Lee Coplan, 63, one of the firm's three founders.
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BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | November 11, 1992
In a long-anticipated development, architecture firm RTKL Associates Inc. said yesterday that it has reached a deal to slash in half its lease commitment to the nearly finished Commerce Place tower at 1 South St.The move, taken jointly by RTKL and its future landlord and one-time Commerce Place partner Harlan/KDC Associates Inc., was a response to depressed architecture business conditions that have forcedRTKL to lay off about a third of its staff since...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Charles Edwin Lamb, an architect of forward-looking, modernist structures and a founder of the RTKL firm, died of complications of Parkinson's disease Dec. 12 at the Heron Point Retirement Community in Chestertown. He was 87 and had lived in Baltimore and Annapolis. A winner of national design awards, Mr. Lamb designed the Greater Baltimore Medical Center, a John Deere distribution center in Timonium and the Edward A. Garmatz Federal Court House on Lombard Street. He was involved with early plans for downtown Baltimore's Charles Center, Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium and the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1996
RTKL Associates Inc. Chairman Harold L. Adams yesterday was named the first recipient of the World Trade Center Institute's Governor's Award, for his work promoting Maryland businesses internationally.The 56-year-old head of the city's largest architectural firm received the award from Gov. Parris N. Glendening at a luncheon at Baltimore-Washington International Airport.Mr. Adams, who is chairman of the World Trade Center Institute, has been primarily responsible for expanding RTKL's scope beyond Baltimore and the United States.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | December 21, 1994
RTKL Associates Inc., the region's largest architectural firm, has been selected as part of a team to design a new $600 million headquarters for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in Montgomery County.RTKL will design the 2.6 million-square-foot complex in conjunction with the Philadelphia-based Kling-Lindquist Partnership Inc. and other consultants.In selecting the team, the U.S. General Services Administration noted RTKL's experience with government jobs and Kling-Lindquist's knowledge of laboratory facilities.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | February 1, 1991
RTKL Associates Inc., Baltimore's largest architectural firm, began this week laying off an undisclosed number of employees at its Baltimore office, a sign that the economic downturn is reducing the need for local architects and engineers.RTKL spokeswoman Ann Carper and human resources director Susan Smith declined to say how many employees will be laid off.Sources contacting The Sun yesterday, who declined to be identified, put the number at 18, which would be less than 5 percent of RTKL's work force in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | November 12, 1994
Leonard S. Kagan, a retired architect and partner of RTK&L Associates Inc., died yesterday of diabetes complications at his Pikesville residence. He was 52.He began his career with the New York City Planning Commission in 1962 and worked for several other New York architectural firms before joining RTK&L in 1969. He retired in 1991.Mr. Kagan designed large commercial retail office buildings and shopping malls in a distinctive modern neo-classical Jeffersonian style. Some of his local projects included White Marsh Mall, Hunt Valley Mall and Commerce Place.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2001
Archibald Coleman Rogers, an architect who founded RTKL Associates Inc. and played a key role in the development of Baltimore's Charles Center and Inner Harbor, died yesterday of complications from a stroke at Keswick Multi-Care Center. He was 84 and lived in Bolton Hill. His vision and his firm helped transform the city's aging business district and once-moribund Inner Harbor. He also attained architecture's top professional honor, the presidency of the American Institute of Architects, in 1973.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2001
In a move that furthers the expansion of the business district to the east, RTKL Associates Inc., the Baltimore architectural firm that has grown into one of the nation's largest, will announce today that it will move its headquarters from a downtown skyscraper to a warehouse-style building it is designing in Fells Point. The firm will move 225 workers from its offices in the signature Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown tower at 1 South St. to a five-story building, to be called Bond Street Wharf, at the foot of Bond Street.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
Frank Taliaferro, a founder and former chairman of the RTKL architects recalled as the "soul" of that firm, died of lung cancer Saturday at his Santa Monica, Calif., home. The former resident of Harwood in Anne Arundel County was 89. Remembered as a mentor to numerous designers at RTKL, Mr. Taliaferro led architects who refined old retail strip centers and finessed them into shopping malls, including Harundale in Glen Burnie and Paramus Park in New Jersey, known for its early food court.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2011
Baltimore-based RTKL Associates Inc. recently beat two international rivals to win a contract to design an iconic structure for a city along the Yangtze River in China. Last winter, RTKL and two other architectural firms — one British, the other French — were invited by a real estate subsidiary of Chinese steel conglomerate Jiangsu Shagang Group to submit plans for a twin-tower, mixed-use project in Zhangjiagang, a city of about 1.5 million people 60 miles west of Shanghai. RTKL won with a design for two high-rise towers connected by an elliptical atrium.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2009
Home prices may be stabilizing, index says Home prices now appear to be falling at a less severe pace across the nation, according to a widely followed index released Tuesday, but values are still lower than last year. Prices of homes sold in May were down 17 percent from the same month a year ago, according to the S&P/Case-Shiller index of home prices in 20 metropolitan areas. The index is now at 2003 levels and is 32 percent below its 2006 peak. But May marked the fourth consecutive month in which the index's decline from the previous year was smaller than that of the preceding month.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,sun architecture critic | July 7, 2007
In acquiring RTKL Associates, ARCADIS has purchased not only the largest architectural firm in Maryland but also the one that has changed the local urban landscape more than any other in the past 100 years. Its contributions range from office towers such as One South Street and Charles Center South to shopping centers in Owings Mills, White Marsh and Towson, and from the Greater Baltimore Medical Center to the Hyatt Regency Baltimore hotel and the soon-to-open downtown Hilton. Many of its former employees have started design firms or otherwise assumed influential roles, including Baltimore Development Corp.
NEWS
By Allison Connolly and June Arney and Allison Connolly and June Arney,Sun reporters | July 7, 2007
RTKL Associates Inc., the homegrown architecture firm that has put its stamp on much of the region as well as worldwide projects including the Beijing Olympics, has been sold to a Dutch engineering and consulting company. ARCADIS, which specializes in environmental remediation, infrastructure and property development, announced yesterday that it had bought the privately held Baltimore firm for an undisclosed sum. RTKL Chairman Paul Jacob III said the firm had been thinking about pursuing a merger for some time as a means to grow more rapidly globally.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | October 26, 2004
A12-story building that combines elements of the Guggenheim Museum in New York, the Habitat '67 residences in Montreal and the Hampton Plaza commercial center in Towson got the nod yesterday as the favored design for the next major addition to the Maryland Institute College of Art. Two designers from the London office of RTKL Associates, Christy Wright and Grant Armstrong, won an international design competition that RTKL and MICA launched in August to...
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau | October 3, 1993
Tokyo -- Michitaka Yamaguchi, Tokyo branch manager for the Baltimore-based RTKL Associates Inc. architects, was sipping coffee and leafing through the Japanese-language construction-trade newspapers one July morning when he spotted the ad.He read only the address before rushing downtown to place RTKL's name atop a list that Ministry of Construction officials were just posting. That fast response, the symbolism of getting RTKL's name down first, a documented history of intense effort and perhaps a hundred other small factors stretched over six years -- all paid off for RTKL last week.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | November 20, 1993
Sears, Roebuck & Co. has hired the Baltimore architecture firm RTKL Associates Inc. to design a prototype for its "store of the future" as part of the retailer's $4 billion effort to overhaul 500 stores.The contract for a joint venture between RTKL and a New York interior design firm was signed in August, but Kurt Haglund, assistant to RTKL chairman Harold L. Adams, said yesterday that Sears initially asked that RTKL not announce the transaction."We're trying to respond to what Sears wants to be. . . . They're a full-line department store," said Joseph Scalabrin, vice chairman of RTKL and head of the firm's Dallas office, which is directing RTKL's role in the project.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2004
For years, Baltimore-based architecture and design firm RTKL Associates earned about 15 percent of its profits from overseas projects tax-free, thanks to a federal export subsidy designed to help U.S. firms compete abroad. Then the World Trade Organization declared the subsidy illegal, leaving RTKL and thousands of other U.S. firms wondering what would happen to their profits from overseas business. They got their answer this week when Congress declared RTKL - a firm that makes most of its money turning out drawings and plans - a U.S. manufacturer deserving of a tax break.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | September 20, 2004
After the kudos they've gotten for their newest building on campus, the glass-clad Brown Center, leaders of the Maryland Institute College of Art have set out to make sure their next building is equally well-received. And they're doing so in characteristically MICA fashion -- by taking an unconventional approach. The college this summer launched a competition to come up with a conceptual design for a $20 million, 200-student residence hall on the northern edge of Baltimore's Mount Royal cultural district.
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