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By DEBORAH JACOBS and DEBORAH JACOBS,Chronicle Features | August 6, 1995
How can pushing those little buttons cause so much pain?That's the question many people ask when they hear that workers who use computer keyboards have developed repetitive strain injuries. Since the symptoms of RSI are invisible, some managers suspect the troops are faking it, in an effort to wriggle out of work. There's even a joke circulating among bosses that RSI "spreads orally," as more and more employees ask for treatment.If you're already injured, you know RSI is no joke. Maybe your wrists are on fire, you wake up in the middle of the night with fingers numb, and you get occasional spasms that paralyze your hands.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn | May 25, 1998
A helping handLately, I've been receiving an auto-response e-mail message at an alarming rate: "Thanks for your message. Unfortunately, I'm suffering from RSI and have to limit my computer time. Please be patient and I'll try to respond as soon as possible." As someone who suffers from a debilitating form of arthritis, I'm amazed that I haven't already developed some form of RSI (repetitive stress injury), the generic term for the cumulative, chronic "microinjuries" associated with repetitive movements and work fatigue.
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FEATURES
By DEBORAH JACOBS and DEBORAH JACOBS,Chronicle Features | July 30, 1995
Doctors say at least one out of every five computer users will develop repetitive strain injury, the painful and sometimes crippling affliction of today's electronic workplace.RSI can show up suddenly or gradually. Common symptoms include burning, tingling, or numbness (sometimes during the night) anywhere from your fingers to your shoulders. By the time you notice these signs, it's already too late to prevent the problem.The best way to avoid RSI or reduce the pain is to install safer equipment, and give yourself five-minute breaks twice an hour.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Kirk and Cheryl Kirk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 4, 1998
Remember your mother nagging you not to sit too close to the TV? She said that if you sat too close, one day you might go blind.Mom's pestering didn't stop there. She prodded you to sit up straight at the dinner table and goaded you into exercise when you spent too many hours watching "Gilligan's Island."Little did Mom know that your childhood behavior was a precursor to the way you would live your adult life - hunched over, staring at a tube, rarely getting outside for a breath of air.In fact, these days you'll be hard pressed to find an office worker who isn't tied to a computer terminal at least part of the day. Worse yet, many of those workers go home and spend more hours in front of their personal computers - surfing the Web, e-mailing relatives, chatting with friends on AOL, or agonizing over their taxes.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1997
Comsat Corp. announced its long-awaited restructuring plan yesterday, but instead of winning cheers from Wall Street, the news was met with a yawn.Bethesda-based Comsat said it plans to sell or spin off its 81 percent stake in money-losing Ascent Entertainment Group Inc. of Denver, which owns the National Basketball Association's Denver Nuggets and the National Hockey League's Colorado Avalanche in addition to the SpectraVision hotel movie-delivery business...
BUSINESS
March 18, 1998
Comsat Corp. said yesterday that it has sold its RSI telecommunications equipment company to TBG Industries Inc. for about $116.5 million.Bethesda-based Comsat announced last March that it would sell RSI to focus on its satellite communications service and digital networking businesses.Comsat provides voice, video and data services through its satellites.Comsat said it will use proceeds from the sale to repay debt. The final price may be adjusted to take into account loans and advances from Comsat to RSI.Comsat has carried RSI on its books as discontinued operations since June.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,Knight-Ridder Newspapers What to do with a VDT Baltimore Gas and ElectricStaff Writer Knight-Ridder News Service contributed to this article | August 14, 1992
From data entry clerks to meat cutters, Maryland workers are being struck with the fast-growing category of occupational illness known as "repetitive stress injuries" or RSI. And employers are searching for measures to control the outbreak of the ailments, which cost billions of dollars to treat each year.How bad is it? RSI, caused by movements that require repeated strain or motion, accounted for more than 44 percent of the occupational illnesses reported by Maryland's private employers in 1990, according to the latest figures available from the Division of Labor and Industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn | May 25, 1998
A helping handLately, I've been receiving an auto-response e-mail message at an alarming rate: "Thanks for your message. Unfortunately, I'm suffering from RSI and have to limit my computer time. Please be patient and I'll try to respond as soon as possible." As someone who suffers from a debilitating form of arthritis, I'm amazed that I haven't already developed some form of RSI (repetitive stress injury), the generic term for the cumulative, chronic "microinjuries" associated with repetitive movements and work fatigue.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1997
New positionsRaymond D. Thomas elected president of COMSAT RSICOMSAT RSI announced the election of Raymond D. Thomas Jr. as president of the COMSAT Corp. subsidiary. He had been serving as acting president after the retirement last year of Richard E. Thomas (no relation). Before the assignment as acting president, he was vice president and general manager of the business unit of RSI's Global Communications Systems.An MBA graduate of George Washington University, Thomas joined the Bethesda-based satellite communications and products company in 1988 as vice president of finance and administration for its systems division.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Kirk and Cheryl Kirk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 4, 1998
Remember your mother nagging you not to sit too close to the TV? She said that if you sat too close, one day you might go blind.Mom's pestering didn't stop there. She prodded you to sit up straight at the dinner table and goaded you into exercise when you spent too many hours watching "Gilligan's Island."Little did Mom know that your childhood behavior was a precursor to the way you would live your adult life - hunched over, staring at a tube, rarely getting outside for a breath of air.In fact, these days you'll be hard pressed to find an office worker who isn't tied to a computer terminal at least part of the day. Worse yet, many of those workers go home and spend more hours in front of their personal computers - surfing the Web, e-mailing relatives, chatting with friends on AOL, or agonizing over their taxes.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1998
Comsat Corp. said yesterday that it has sold its RSI telecommunications equipment company to TBG Industries Inc. for about $116.5 million.Bethesda-based Comsat announced last March that it would sell RSI to focus on its satellite communications service and digital networking businesses.Comsat provides voice, video and data services through its satellites.Comsat said it will use proceeds from the sale to repay debt. The final price may be adjusted to take into account loans and advances from Comsat to RSI.Comsat has carried RSI on its books as discontinued operations since June.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1997
Comsat Corp. announced its long-awaited restructuring plan yesterday, but instead of winning cheers from Wall Street, the news was met with a yawn.Bethesda-based Comsat said it plans to sell or spin off its 81 percent stake in money-losing Ascent Entertainment Group Inc. of Denver, which owns the National Basketball Association's Denver Nuggets and the National Hockey League's Colorado Avalanche in addition to the SpectraVision hotel movie-delivery business...
BUSINESS
February 10, 1997
New positionsRaymond D. Thomas elected president of COMSAT RSICOMSAT RSI announced the election of Raymond D. Thomas Jr. as president of the COMSAT Corp. subsidiary. He had been serving as acting president after the retirement last year of Richard E. Thomas (no relation). Before the assignment as acting president, he was vice president and general manager of the business unit of RSI's Global Communications Systems.An MBA graduate of George Washington University, Thomas joined the Bethesda-based satellite communications and products company in 1988 as vice president of finance and administration for its systems division.
FEATURES
By DEBORAH JACOBS and DEBORAH JACOBS,Chronicle Features | August 6, 1995
How can pushing those little buttons cause so much pain?That's the question many people ask when they hear that workers who use computer keyboards have developed repetitive strain injuries. Since the symptoms of RSI are invisible, some managers suspect the troops are faking it, in an effort to wriggle out of work. There's even a joke circulating among bosses that RSI "spreads orally," as more and more employees ask for treatment.If you're already injured, you know RSI is no joke. Maybe your wrists are on fire, you wake up in the middle of the night with fingers numb, and you get occasional spasms that paralyze your hands.
FEATURES
By DEBORAH JACOBS and DEBORAH JACOBS,Chronicle Features | July 30, 1995
Doctors say at least one out of every five computer users will develop repetitive strain injury, the painful and sometimes crippling affliction of today's electronic workplace.RSI can show up suddenly or gradually. Common symptoms include burning, tingling, or numbness (sometimes during the night) anywhere from your fingers to your shoulders. By the time you notice these signs, it's already too late to prevent the problem.The best way to avoid RSI or reduce the pain is to install safer equipment, and give yourself five-minute breaks twice an hour.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,Knight-Ridder Newspapers What to do with a VDT Baltimore Gas and ElectricStaff Writer Knight-Ridder News Service contributed to this article | August 14, 1992
From data entry clerks to meat cutters, Maryland workers are being struck with the fast-growing category of occupational illness known as "repetitive stress injuries" or RSI. And employers are searching for measures to control the outbreak of the ailments, which cost billions of dollars to treat each year.How bad is it? RSI, caused by movements that require repeated strain or motion, accounted for more than 44 percent of the occupational illnesses reported by Maryland's private employers in 1990, according to the latest figures available from the Division of Labor and Industry.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2008
Product recalls for the week beginning Dec. 31: Jan. 2 Name of product: 2006-2008 Model Year MXU 500 All Terrain Vehicles Units: 1,350 Importer: KYMCO USA of Spartanburg, S.C. Hazard: The pivot bolts holding the rear suspension onto the frame can become loose, causing the rear swing arm to detach from the chassis, posing a risk of injury or death to the operator. Sold by: KYMCO dealers nationwide from November 2006 through December 2007 for between $6,000 and $6,500. Remedy: Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled ATVs and contact an authorized KYMCO dealer in their area to schedule a free repair.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1995
Comsat RSI wins state contractsComsat RSI, the manufacturing arm of Bethesda-based Comsat Corp., said yesterday that it has won two contracts worth a total of $8 million to provide satellite technology for two state governments' "distance learning" networks.The company said Virginia awarded it a contract to provide three digital "uplinks" for sending programming from the University of Virginia, Virginia Tech and Old Dominion University. The company will also provide "downlinks" for receiving programs at other locations.
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