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BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1999
The new owner of Dap Products Inc. said yesterday that it would close 23 plants and eliminate more than 700 jobs as part of a corporate restructuring and consolidation, although the purge is expected to have little effect on the local adhesive and sealant maker.RPM Inc.'s moves to slash redundancies come less than a week after the Medina, Ohio-based company completed its $290 million purchase of Dap and announced plans to combine it with its Bondex adhesives division.Glenn Hasman, RPM's vice president of financial operations, said that while there are "synergies" and the potential for "cross marketing" between Dap and Bondex, the local company will likely not experience cuts from the restructuring.
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BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | March 25, 2008
The Q: Last week, we tackled the definition of "gas delivery charge" on your Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. bill (the price the utility charges you to deliver your natural gas), and the complicated reason behind why the charge varies from month-to-month. We would explain it to you again, but it would take far too much space. Instead, we'll just tell you that our foray into utility billing explanations prompted H. Walter Townshend III to ask about Reliability Pricing Models (RPM). "As a chamber, we have put together electric purchasing cooperatives, collectively saving our members millions of dollars," said Townshend, president and chief executive of the Baltimore/Washington Corridor Chamber of Commerce.
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BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1999
RPM Inc. of Ohio said yesterday that it completed its acquisition of Baltimore-based DAP Products Inc. and DAP Canada Corp. for $290 million in cash.Dave Reif, vice president of finance for RPM, a sealant manufacturer whose brands include Rust-Oleum and Zinsser, said it will be "business as usual" for DAP's employees and customers.He said DAP will continue to be based in Baltimore under the leadership of President and Chief Executive Officer John McLaughlin, and no layoffs or plant closings are planned.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2007
Monday Report -- Institute for Supply Management index Earnings -- AngioDynamics Inc.; Palm Inc.; Walgreen Co. Tuesday Report -- September vehicle sales Earnings -- Micron Technology Inc.; Pepsi Bottling Group Inc. Wednesday Report -- Institute for Supply Management services index Earnings -- RPM International Inc.; Wolverine World Wide Inc. Thursday Reports -- August factory orders; weekly initial jobless claims Earnings -- Acuity Brands Inc.;...
FEATURES
By Rodney Ho and Rodney Ho,COX NEWS SERVICE | March 10, 2003
The 45 rpm vinyl single is a fragile black platter, 7 inches in diameter, with a doughnut-hole center and concentric ridges. To baby boomers, it brings back memories of living-room bashes and junior high make-out sessions. To anyone under age 20, it's as foreign as a rotary phone. But its current irrelevancy hasn't deterred Bill Windsor, a 54-year-old Dunwoody, Ga., entrepreneur, from compiling one of the largest collections of 45s around. At his Web site, www.45s.com, collectors can buy almost every vinyl single that charted on the Billboard 100 from the 1950s to the '90s, most for a modest $5. "Except for Sinatra, the Beatles and Elvis, most of my 45s aren't worth that much," Windsor says.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2005
LONG POND, Pa. - Elliott Sadler barreled down the 3,740-foot Pocono Raceway front stretch during practice for tomorrow's Pocono 500, his speed climbing to nearly 200 mph, but slowing to a more manageable 190 as he dived into the first turn. Sadler, who signed a three-year contract extension with Robert Yates Racing yesterday, had little to do as he whipped along. The only demands were to press the gas pedal and tap the brake. Gear shifting, something he had had to learn as a rookie here seven years ago, is for all intents and purposes passe.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1999
DAP Products Inc., which made a splash last summer when it became the first office tenant in the renovated American Can Co. in Canton, said yesterday that it will be acquired by an Ohio company for $290 million in cash.The acquisition by sealant manufacturer RPM Inc., whose brands include Rust-Oleum and Bondex, is expected to close next month. DAP is a subsidiary of the publicly traded London equity firm Wassall PLC.DAP moved its headquarters and research-and-development operations from Tipp City, Ohio, to Baltimore last summer.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services Inc | August 21, 1992
In 1966, the Beatles upset sensibilities with their "Yesterday -- and Today" album cover picturing the Fab Four in butcher smocks amid chunks of meat and chopped-up parts of toy dolls.Public indignation led to a quick recall of the offending covers, most of which were destroyed by Capitol Records. The record was reissued in more ho-hum wrappings. More than a few shrewd folks surmised there might one day be some value to the banned covers.They were right. A stereo version of the original album in sealed, mint condition recently sold for $15,000.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | March 25, 2008
The Q: Last week, we tackled the definition of "gas delivery charge" on your Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. bill (the price the utility charges you to deliver your natural gas), and the complicated reason behind why the charge varies from month-to-month. We would explain it to you again, but it would take far too much space. Instead, we'll just tell you that our foray into utility billing explanations prompted H. Walter Townshend III to ask about Reliability Pricing Models (RPM). "As a chamber, we have put together electric purchasing cooperatives, collectively saving our members millions of dollars," said Townshend, president and chief executive of the Baltimore/Washington Corridor Chamber of Commerce.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2007
Monday Report -- Institute for Supply Management index Earnings -- AngioDynamics Inc.; Palm Inc.; Walgreen Co. Tuesday Report -- September vehicle sales Earnings -- Micron Technology Inc.; Pepsi Bottling Group Inc. Wednesday Report -- Institute for Supply Management services index Earnings -- RPM International Inc.; Wolverine World Wide Inc. Thursday Reports -- August factory orders; weekly initial jobless claims Earnings -- Acuity Brands Inc.;...
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | November 23, 2006
My most treasured Thanksgiving story does not involve turkey or pumpkin pie, family or football. It didn't last longer than a phone call to a man I'd met but once - a conversation I was not aware I was going to have when I headed to St. Leo's Roman Catholic Church for Mass in Little Italy last Thanksgiving. The fourth Thursday of each November is my favorite holiday: It is spiritual without being religious, it revolves around family at table - certainly the great American altar - and advertisers have yet to destroy it with the buying of gifts.
NEWS
August 29, 2005
At the Carroll County commissioners' cabinet meeting, Lt. A. Dean Richardson, commander of the state police barracks in Westminster, detailed a list of enforcement initiatives scheduled for Labor Day weekend. They include sobriety checkpoints, saturation patrols to snag speeders and a major warrant roundup to find those who have avoided prosecution. At least 25 additional troopers will be on county roads throughout the three-day weekend, he said. Richard Soisson, county director of recreation and parks, followed the lieutenant during the roundtable discussion.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2005
LONG POND, Pa. - Elliott Sadler barreled down the 3,740-foot Pocono Raceway front stretch during practice for tomorrow's Pocono 500, his speed climbing to nearly 200 mph, but slowing to a more manageable 190 as he dived into the first turn. Sadler, who signed a three-year contract extension with Robert Yates Racing yesterday, had little to do as he whipped along. The only demands were to press the gas pedal and tap the brake. Gear shifting, something he had had to learn as a rookie here seven years ago, is for all intents and purposes passe.
FEATURES
By Rodney Ho and Rodney Ho,COX NEWS SERVICE | March 10, 2003
The 45 rpm vinyl single is a fragile black platter, 7 inches in diameter, with a doughnut-hole center and concentric ridges. To baby boomers, it brings back memories of living-room bashes and junior high make-out sessions. To anyone under age 20, it's as foreign as a rotary phone. But its current irrelevancy hasn't deterred Bill Windsor, a 54-year-old Dunwoody, Ga., entrepreneur, from compiling one of the largest collections of 45s around. At his Web site, www.45s.com, collectors can buy almost every vinyl single that charted on the Billboard 100 from the 1950s to the '90s, most for a modest $5. "Except for Sinatra, the Beatles and Elvis, most of my 45s aren't worth that much," Windsor says.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2001
After collecting an estimated 350,000 vinyl records, Ken Hudson considers his tiny Catonsville record store more a museum than a business. It's not Picassos and da Vincis that adorn the walls of this museum. The artwork here consists of covers from long-forgotten albums - Lou Rawls' "Too Much," Ray Charles' "Crying Time" and Quincy Jones' "Smackwater Jack." Hudson and his brother, Jim, have accumulated the black discs, sheathed in paper and cardboard sleeves and occupying countless shelves, over the past 16 years at Music Man Oldies, at 808 Ingleside Ave. As record curator, Hudson estimates that he cares for about 250,000 of the 45-rpm records once so popular with teen-agers and about 100,000 long-playing albums, many of which have found their final resting place in the store.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2001
After collecting an estimated 350,000 vinyl records, Ken Hudson considers his tiny Catonsville record store more a museum than a business. It's not Picassos and Leonardo da Vincis that adorn the walls of this museum. The artwork here consists of covers from long-forgotten albums - Lou Rawls' "Too Much," Ray Charles' "Crying Time" and Quincy Jones' "Smackwater Jack." Hudson and his brother, Jim, have accumulated the black discs, sheathed in paper and cardboard sleeves and occupying countless shelves, over the past 16 years at Music Man Oldies, at 808 Ingleside Ave. As record curator, Hudson estimates that he cares for about 250,000 of the 45-rpm records once so popular with teen-agers and about 100,000 long-playing albums, many of which have found their final resting place in the store.
FEATURES
By John Ardoin and John Ardoin,Dallas Morning News | November 28, 1990
As long as there have been commercial recordings, and as long as there have been catalogs to detail them, Enrico Caruso has been a formidable force. There have been Caruso recordings on cylinders, discs and tapes. The discs have spun at 78 rpm, 45 rpm and 33 1/3 rpm. And they are tracked by a laserbeam on compact disc.Just in time for Christmas, RCA Victor, the principal custodian of the Caruso legacy, has issued 12 CDs that encompass every surviving note the great Italian tenor recorded (60495-2-RG)
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2001
After collecting an estimated 350,000 vinyl records, Ken Hudson considers his tiny Catonsville record store more a museum than a business. It's not Picassos and da Vincis that adorn the walls of this museum. The artwork here consists of covers from long-forgotten albums - Lou Rawls' "Too Much," Ray Charles' "Crying Time" and Quincy Jones' "Smackwater Jack." Hudson and his brother, Jim, have accumulated the black discs, sheathed in paper and cardboard sleeves and occupying countless shelves, over the past 16 years at Music Man Oldies, at 808 Ingleside Ave. As record curator, Hudson estimates that he cares for about 250,000 of the 45-rpm records once so popular with teen-agers and about 100,000 long-playing albums, many of which have found their final resting place in the store.
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