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NEWS
October 30, 2006
On Saturday October 28, 2006, CATHERINE ELLA "Kitty" ROZELLE, beloved mother of Sharon L. Winfield, David L. Rozelle, Kathryn A. Hale and Donna L. Rozelle, mother of the late Martin L. Rozelle, Jr., dear mother-in-law of Gary Hale Sr., and Brenda R. Rozelle, loving grandmother of David L. Rozelle Jr., Gary A. Hale Jr., and Heather M. Hale, dear aunt of Larry Overman. Friends may call at the Loring Byers Funeral Directors Inc., 8728 Liberty Road (2 mi. West of Beltway exit 18B) on Tuesday from 7 to 9 P.M. where services will be held on Wednesday at 10 A.M. Interment in Woodlawn Cemetery.
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NEWS
October 30, 2006
On Saturday October 28, 2006, CATHERINE ELLA "Kitty" ROZELLE, beloved mother of Sharon L. Winfield, David L. Rozelle, Kathryn A. Hale and Donna L. Rozelle, mother of the late Martin L. Rozelle, Jr., dear mother-in-law of Gary Hale Sr., and Brenda R. Rozelle, loving grandmother of David L. Rozelle Jr., Gary A. Hale Jr., and Heather M. Hale, dear aunt of Larry Overman. Friends may call at the Loring Byers Funeral Directors Inc., 8728 Liberty Road (2 mi. West of Beltway exit 18B) on Tuesday from 7 to 9 P.M. where services will be held on Wednesday at 10 A.M. Interment in Woodlawn Cemetery.
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SPORTS
By John Steadman | December 8, 1996
He went from the humble role of clipping newspaper stories about the Los Angeles Rams and dutifully placing them into a team scrapbook, which was his first paid job in professional football, to becoming one of the most important, influential and recognized figures in the history of the game. The extraordinary saga of Alvin Pete Rozelle found him taking the rough edges off the sport and leading it into the boardrooms of corporate America.He had few parallels in any business and was the most progressive, eloquent and productive of all commissioners.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 9, 2001
There is an electric air of anticipation around Baltimore as the Ravens conclude their preparations to open the 2001 NFL season in defense of their world championship. This euphoric feeling is in stark contrast to the atmosphere surrounding the training camp of the Baltimore Colts a quarter of a century ago. "Rebellion" rather than "repeat" was the word most often heard among the 1976 Colts, rallying in support of their coach, Ted Marchibroda, who had resigned a week before the season opener in a power struggle with general manager Joe Thomas.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1996
It was fitting that when Pete Rozelle died, it would be late on a Friday night.The consummate public relations man, Rozelle liked to wait until Fridays to announce bad news because the Saturday papers are often the week's smallest.Rozelle would have wanted the news of his death to be obscured. For all his success as NFL commissioner, he was not a man who sought the limelight.He liked working behind he scenes and never let his ego get the best of him.He was one of the few successful men who could publicly admit when he made a mistake.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | January 28, 1996
TEMPE, Ariz. -- When others doubted, Pete Rozelle believed. The Super Bowl now celebrates its 30th birthday, moving into young adulthood while at the same time evolving into a Mardi Gras-like event that has become more of a national holiday than a football game.America has the vision of Rozelle to thank for it. Every one of the coveted 76,300 tickets has long been exhausted at prices of $200, $250 and $350. Scalpers are quoting pre-kickoff figures of $1,500 for a single seat to see the Dallas Cowboys and Pittsburgh Steelers roll around on the grass of Sun Devil Stadium.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | December 1, 1993
ROSEMONT, Ill. -- Malcolm Glazer, a man not known for sentimentality, was near tears yesterday after Baltimore's bid for an NFL expansion team ended in failure."
SPORTS
December 5, 1999
1957: Celtics win first NBA title1960: Ted Williams homers in his last at-bat1960: Pete Rozelle named NFL commissioner
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1995
Owner Art Modell of the Cleveland Browns and Baltimore are a perfect fit.Both played key roles in the rise of the NFL. And both fell out of favor during Paul Tagliabue's reign as commissioner.In 1981, Modell was labeled in one poll as the second most influential person in the league behind then-commissioner Pete Rozelle.That was in the heyday of what became known as "league think," when a handful of influential owners supported what was in the best interests of the league.It wasn't surprising Modell was one of the strongest opponents of the move of the Raiders from Oakland, Calif.
SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | November 21, 1993
Like most Americans over the age of 35, Art Modell will never forget the moment he heard the awful news on that Friday afternoon 30 years ago tomorrow."
SPORTS
December 5, 1999
1957: Celtics win first NBA title1960: Ted Williams homers in his last at-bat1960: Pete Rozelle named NFL commissioner
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | November 27, 1997
Today, of course, is a day to express gratitude for the things that are most important in life, to give thanks, if you will, hence the name of the day. And it's a good thing that it's Thanksgiving Day, for Gratitude Expression Day probably wouldn't work all that well on a greeting card.But if you're a person who loves to watch football on television, every day in general, and today in particular, is a day to give thanks to Ravens owner Art Modell.With 32 years as chairman of the NFL's television committee, Modell has been as instrumental as anyone at shaping the very policy that makes it possible for good folks like you to enjoy today's heaping helping of gridiron fun, including Fox's Chicago-Detroit offering (Channel 45, 11: 30 a.m. pre-game show)
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1996
It was fitting that when Pete Rozelle died, it would be late on a Friday night.The consummate public relations man, Rozelle liked to wait until Fridays to announce bad news because the Saturday papers are often the week's smallest.Rozelle would have wanted the news of his death to be obscured. For all his success as NFL commissioner, he was not a man who sought the limelight.He liked working behind he scenes and never let his ego get the best of him.He was one of the few successful men who could publicly admit when he made a mistake.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | December 8, 1996
He went from the humble role of clipping newspaper stories about the Los Angeles Rams and dutifully placing them into a team scrapbook, which was his first paid job in professional football, to becoming one of the most important, influential and recognized figures in the history of the game. The extraordinary saga of Alvin Pete Rozelle found him taking the rough edges off the sport and leading it into the boardrooms of corporate America.He had few parallels in any business and was the most progressive, eloquent and productive of all commissioners.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1996
Pete Rozelle, who transformed the NFL from a struggling 12-team league into the greatest success story in modern American sports during his 29-year tenure as commissioner, died yesterday from brain cancer at his home in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. He was 70.Rozelle, who was 33 when he was named commissioner as a surprise compromise choice in 1960, resigned as the NFL's leader in 1989. He underwent surgery for brain cancer in December 1993."He was the best commissioner there ever was in any sport," said his close friend Dan Rooney, president of the Pittsburgh Steelers.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | January 28, 1996
TEMPE, Ariz. -- When others doubted, Pete Rozelle believed. The Super Bowl now celebrates its 30th birthday, moving into young adulthood while at the same time evolving into a Mardi Gras-like event that has become more of a national holiday than a football game.America has the vision of Rozelle to thank for it. Every one of the coveted 76,300 tickets has long been exhausted at prices of $200, $250 and $350. Scalpers are quoting pre-kickoff figures of $1,500 for a single seat to see the Dallas Cowboys and Pittsburgh Steelers roll around on the grass of Sun Devil Stadium.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | November 27, 1997
Today, of course, is a day to express gratitude for the things that are most important in life, to give thanks, if you will, hence the name of the day. And it's a good thing that it's Thanksgiving Day, for Gratitude Expression Day probably wouldn't work all that well on a greeting card.But if you're a person who loves to watch football on television, every day in general, and today in particular, is a day to give thanks to Ravens owner Art Modell.With 32 years as chairman of the NFL's television committee, Modell has been as instrumental as anyone at shaping the very policy that makes it possible for good folks like you to enjoy today's heaping helping of gridiron fun, including Fox's Chicago-Detroit offering (Channel 45, 11: 30 a.m. pre-game show)
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 9, 2001
There is an electric air of anticipation around Baltimore as the Ravens conclude their preparations to open the 2001 NFL season in defense of their world championship. This euphoric feeling is in stark contrast to the atmosphere surrounding the training camp of the Baltimore Colts a quarter of a century ago. "Rebellion" rather than "repeat" was the word most often heard among the 1976 Colts, rallying in support of their coach, Ted Marchibroda, who had resigned a week before the season opener in a power struggle with general manager Joe Thomas.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1995
Owner Art Modell of the Cleveland Browns and Baltimore are a perfect fit.Both played key roles in the rise of the NFL. And both fell out of favor during Paul Tagliabue's reign as commissioner.In 1981, Modell was labeled in one poll as the second most influential person in the league behind then-commissioner Pete Rozelle.That was in the heyday of what became known as "league think," when a handful of influential owners supported what was in the best interests of the league.It wasn't surprising Modell was one of the strongest opponents of the move of the Raiders from Oakland, Calif.
SPORTS
By Charles Chandler and Charles Chandler,Charlotte Observer | October 26, 1994
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Jerry Richardson, out of competitive necessity, kept it secret for years.He says a phone call five years ago was vital to the NFL's decision to award him and the Carolinas a pro football franchise one year ago today.It was late 1989. Pete Rozelle had just retired after 30 years as NFL commissioner. Richardson had already announced his pursuit of an expansion franchise based in Charlotte."Pete," Richardson said to Rozelle via long-distance call, "if it wouldn't be awkward for you, now that you're no longer commissioner, would you mind if I came to see you and asked you to help coach us in trying to get this franchise?"
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