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By Kevin Van Valkenburg | May 4, 2011
We'll get to the more serious Kentucky Derby news soon, but before we do, a brief word about patriotic fashion. Although it's only Wednesday here at Churchill Downs, you can already take a stroll of the grounds and see countless beautiful women wearing the kind of gigantic, gaudy hats that have become an important Derby stable during the last 100-plus years. And while I mostly ignored the Royal Wedding between Prince William and Kate Middleton, I couldn't help but be struck today by how much better our ridiculous formal headware is in America than the ridiculous formal headware in England.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | June 22, 2011
This may be Charm City, but the PR outfit promoting Prince Edward's visit wasn't sure the Baltimore press corps had the polish to cover royalty. So IMRE took it upon itself to play Henry Higgins to newsroom Eliza Doolittles. "Royal Protocol: The general rule is that on first meeting the salutation is 'Your Royal Highness' and thereafter 'Sir,'" reporters were instructed via email. (I'm wondering if Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's office sent the prince a similar primer, with a "Don't call me 'Stephanie '" advisory.
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NEWS
By Kat Richter | April 28, 2011
Friday mornings at 4 a.m. generally find me asleep, but this week I'll be among the thousands of Anglophiles glued to my television for the "wedding of the century. " At 25, I've spent the better part of my adult life either in Europe or wishing I was in Europe. I went to grad school in London and cut my teeth on all things British during my junior year at Goucher College, which I spent at Oxford University. There, I learned to raise my glass to the Queen, and when she came to dine at Christ Church College (in the very same hall that served as the model for Harry Potter)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | June 21, 2011
Prince Edward -- 7 th in line to the British throne, youngest child of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip, 48-year-old kid brother to Prince Charles, Prince Andrew and Princess Anne -- comes to Baltimore Tuesday NOT to discuss his biggest claim to fame, that he's also father of a 7-year-old royal wedding bridesmaid. HRH The Prince Edward, as he is formally known, won’t be discussing the little bridesmaid, Lady Louise Windsor, or the royal wedding at all, as my colleague Erica Green learned.
FEATURES
April 8, 2005
TV network coverage plans for tomorrow's royal wedding of Prince Charles and Camilla Parker Bowles. ABC: 7 a.m., Kate Snow and Bill Weir, anchors CBS: 7 a.m., Russ Mitchell and Tracy Smith, anchors NBC: 7 a.m., Lester Holt and Campbell Brown, anchors CNN: 6 a.m., Anderson Cooper and Becky Anderson, anchors Fox News Channel: 7 a.m., Jon Scott and E.D. Hill, anchors MSNBC: 7 a.m., Alex Witt, anchor WE: 7 a.m., BBC coverage of the wedding
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | January 23, 1993
TOKYO -- To the dark-suited chamberlains of Japan's Imperial Household Agency, the marriage of a crown prince brings dreams of a long-awaited direct male heir to the Chrysanthemum Throne.To the silver-haired stewards of Japan Inc., the same marriage brings dreams of high-tech TV sales and flowing bank deposits.Businessmen set out to make their dreams come true almost the minute the world learned this month that Crown Prince Naruhito, 33, had succeeded at last in his six-year quest for the hand of Harvard-educated career diplomat Masako Owada, 29."
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2011
Move over, Animal Kingdom. This year's Preakness front-runner is likely to be the fascinator, at least in the grandstands. With the royal wedding fresh in people's minds, milliners and the fashion-forward alike predict a change in the hat fashion at Maryland's most famous horse race. Traditional wide-brimmed straw hats adorned with black-eyed Susans could be replaced by fascinators — smaller, show-stopper hats anchored to a headband — or other headpieces similar to those recently worn at Westminster Abbey.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2011
At a time when much of the English-speaking world is fixated on the royal wedding, it's worth pointing out that if it weren't for the original Baltimore bad girl, Wallis Warfield Simpson, Friday's nuptials might not be taking place. Without her, there might be no reason to obsess about Kate Middleton's dress. There'd be no gossip about the guest list. (Fergie and Simon Cowell were both royally snubbed.) There'd be no "sweet William" soaps or official royal wedding rose petal jelly for tourists in London to snap up. "If Wallis Simpson had never been born, King Edward VIII might not have abdicated the throne," says Hugo Vickers, the British-born author and royal expert who will be providing commentary about the wedding for the Associated Press Television News.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | June 21, 1999
The difference between Greenspan and the Oracle at Delphi is that her meaning was clearer. Authentic preservationists won't be satisfied until the fields of Gettysburg run red with blood. The best way to give to the United Way is to let them decide what to do with it. They've been studying up. Cheer up. We've had another royal wedding.
NEWS
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1997
Sixteen years and two children ago, Marisa Shaff invited a group of college buddies to watch the royal wedding. Sitting in her parents' living room, the girls sipped Twining's tea, munched biscuits and scones and waved homemade Charles and Diana placards as a beautiful girl their own age stepped out of a fairy-tale carriage and into history.Early yesterday morning, Shaff was in front of the television again, huddled in a blanket, feeling shaky, sick and a little nervous as she and her husband watched Princess Diana's final journey.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2011
Move over, Animal Kingdom. This year's Preakness front-runner is likely to be the fascinator, at least in the grandstands. With the royal wedding fresh in people's minds, milliners and the fashion-forward alike predict a change in the hat fashion at Maryland's most famous horse race. Traditional wide-brimmed straw hats adorned with black-eyed Susans could be replaced by fascinators — smaller, show-stopper hats anchored to a headband — or other headpieces similar to those recently worn at Westminster Abbey.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2011
Nikki Yancey knew that no pictures had been released of Osama bin Laden after the terrorist leader was killed this week in a lightning raid by U.S. commandos in Pakistan. So she was surprised when a friend reported that Yancey's Facebook account had tried to entice her 600-plus friends to click on a link that allegedly would bring up photographs of the dead al-Qaida leader. In reality, no such images were available. What happened? Yancey's social networking identity had been hijacked.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | May 5, 2011
There is nothing like the death of the world's most-wanted terrorist to blow a royal wedding right off the front page. Will and Kate's helicopter had no more taken off from Buckingham Palace the morning after their wedding than U.S. helicopters were dropping Navy SEALS into Osama bin Laden's compound to kill him. We went from watching happy throngs waving Union Jacks in Trafalgar Square to watching happy throngs waving American flags at Ground...
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg | May 4, 2011
We'll get to the more serious Kentucky Derby news soon, but before we do, a brief word about patriotic fashion. Although it's only Wednesday here at Churchill Downs, you can already take a stroll of the grounds and see countless beautiful women wearing the kind of gigantic, gaudy hats that have become an important Derby stable during the last 100-plus years. And while I mostly ignored the Royal Wedding between Prince William and Kate Middleton, I couldn't help but be struck today by how much better our ridiculous formal headware is in America than the ridiculous formal headware in England.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | May 1, 2011
Who would have thought as the Ravens hunkered down for the 2011 NFL draft Thursday night that the long weekend at The Castle in Owings Mills would feature more interpersonal subplots and political intrigue than the royal wedding? It's not often that the highly choreographed first round devolves into a mini-feud between two teams over telephone etiquette, and it's certainly not often that Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti gets so worked up about something that he dials up a Baltimore Sun reporter in the wee hours to publicly vent his frustration over the way the Chicago Bears accidentally reneged on a deal that would have given the Ravens one more draft choice.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2011
The sun wasn't even up yet, but the partying had already started at Union Jack's in Columbia. Royal weddings, after all, come along only once in a generation. "A wedding like this, it's history," said Union Jack's owner Gary Ouellette, whose restaurant was packed with more than 100 star-struck royal watchers by the time the London wedding ceremony of Prince William and Kate Middleton started at 6 a.m. "We may not see anything quite like this again in our lifetime. " Don't say that to Mary Anne Johnson, Frances Thomas and Cathy Graham.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | April 16, 2011
Last night I made the mistake of accidentally leaving the channel on Lawrence O'Donnell's show. This turned out to be a much greater error than I originally thought. Prior to this, I mistakenly believed O'Donnell's show would be something similar to Rachel Maddow's. I like Maddow. I don't always agree with her, but she's smart, funny and treats her guests with respect.  But O'Donnell was much, much different. He was completely humorless. He was pedantic and moralizing. He managed to be shallow, didactic, illogical and myopic all at the same time.  On the show, O'Donnell took on that toughest of opponents: the British royal wedding between Prince William and Kate Middleton.  What followed was a meandering diatribe bashing the history of the British empire and the state of American media.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | June 21, 2011
Prince Edward -- 7 th in line to the British throne, youngest child of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip, 48-year-old kid brother to Prince Charles, Prince Andrew and Princess Anne -- comes to Baltimore Tuesday NOT to discuss his biggest claim to fame, that he's also father of a 7-year-old royal wedding bridesmaid. HRH The Prince Edward, as he is formally known, won’t be discussing the little bridesmaid, Lady Louise Windsor, or the royal wedding at all, as my colleague Erica Green learned.
NEWS
April 29, 2011
By the time you read this, millions of Americans will have risen this morning at an hour best suited for dairy farming to watch wall-to-wall coverage of the televised wedding of Britain's Kate Middleton and Prince William. The TV networks are certainly milking the royal nuptials for all they are worth, having dispatched hundreds of reporters and producers to the scene to capture every pomp and circumstance. It's hard to see the harm in this shared moment of Anglophilia, aside from what envy it may generate from those impressionable youngsters watching it all on the family big screen TV with visions of wedding ceremonies half as lavish.
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