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April 13, 2000
Britain's Queen Elizabeth presents the George Cross to police Constable Paul Slaine in honor of the Royal Ulster Constabulary's bravery during the sectarian strife in Northern Ireland in Belfast yesterday. Pub Date: 4/13/00
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 5, 2001
LONDON - The European Court of Human Rights ruled yesterday that Britain had violated the rights of 10 members of the Irish Republican Army and two civilians shot to death by government security forces in Northern Ireland in the 1980s and early 1990s. Provoking a surge of anger from unionist politicians and others who support British control of the province, the court ordered the British government to pay about $14,000 in compensation as well as tens of thousands of dollars in court costs to the families of each of the victims.
NEWS
August 29, 2000
THE BRITISH let Johnny "Mad Dog" Adair out of prison with other self-styled soldiers as part of the peace in Northern Ireland. Never mind that he had murdered dozens of Catholics and been convicted of directing terrorism. This was part of the deal that restarted legitimate politics amid a cease-fire by both republican (Catholic) and loyalist (Protestant) paramilitaries. Freedom, to Mad Dog, meant freedom to parade for two months up and down his Shankill Road turf in West Belfast in a bulletproof vest, and reassert the reign of his group, the Ulster Freedom Fighters (UFF)
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 30, 1996
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- On May 4, 1973, a sniper shot Constable Jim Seymour in the head as he opened the gate to a fortified police station. For more than two decades, he lay paralyzed in a coma, a painful symbol in a long line of police casualties from this land's sectarian warfare. Constable Seymour died March 2, 1995.There may never have been a more dangerous place to be a police officer than the gritty streets of Belfast. Across 25 bloody years, officers of the Royal Ulster Constabulary -- strongly identified with the Protestant community -- were slain at an average of one a month.
NEWS
July 20, 2000
ONCE MORE, Northern Ireland has come through the main marching season without major explosion. But the understanding, tolerance and mutual respect needed to make its experiment in power sharing a success are not in sight. The British Parliament celebrated the 310th anniversary of William of Orange's victory over King James at the Battle of the Boyne by renaming the Royal Ulster Constabulary as the Northern Ireland Police Service. But it stopped short of legislating other reforms recommended by a commission to win police respect in both communities.
NEWS
November 12, 2001
THE GOOD NEWS from Northern Ireland is considerable and also, it is hoped, contagious. Executive government is back with David Trimble as first minister. He was approved by the majority of members of the assembly, by his Ulster Unionist Party and by the loyalist grass roots as polled. The new deputy first minister is Mark Durkan, new leader of the Social Democratic and Labor Party (SDLP), which has been the main political voice of the Catholic minority for three decades. Mr. Durkan represents generational change from Seamus Mallon in government and from John Hume in leading the party that pioneered civil rights and constitutional nationalism.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 29, 2000
LONDON -- Gerry Adams, president of Sinn Fein, the Irish Republican Army's political wing, has ruled out the possibility that the underground paramilitary force will move to meet a crucial deadline Monday for the beginning of disarmament. In a speech Thursday night that appeared to acknowledge the setback his statement would represent for the Northern Ireland peace settlement and the future of the fragile new government in Belfast, Adams said that while he understood the wish for immediate action, "It is not easy to get the IRA, or indeed any of the armed groups, to do this speedily.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | February 18, 1998
DUBLIN -- The Northern Ireland peace process moved last night from the conference room to the streets, as lawyers for Sinn Fein scoured the city looking for a judge who was willing to halt its expulsion from the talks.They didn't find one, but vowed to be back in the courts this morning.It was the latest turn in a process that has ground to a halt over the question of whether Sinn Fein should be temporarily expelled because of two killings allegedly carried out last week by the Irish Republican Army.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 18, 2003
LONDON - Officers from British Army intelligence and the Royal Ulster Constabulary in Northern Ireland helped Protestant guerrillas kill Roman Catholics in the late 1980s, a report by Britain's senior police official said yesterday. Sir John Stevens, commissioner of London's Metropolitan Police, said his 14-year investigation into the explosive allegations of official collusion had found that members of the army's covert Force Research Unit, which handled informants, and the police Special Branch espionage arm "were allowed to operate without effective control and to participate in terrorist crimes."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 20, 1994
LONDON -- Police in Northern Ireland warned of more sectarian killings after six Catholics were killed by gunmen while watching Ireland's World Cup soccer match on television in a pub late Saturday."
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