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By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | June 4, 1991
The grand jazz days of the Royal Theatre on Pennsylvania Avenue are being revived in a glitzy new musical revue, "Sneakin' Out at the Royal," by Baltimorean Cherri Cunningham-Cragway. An Encore Dinner Theatre production, the show is playing at The Forum on Wednesday evenings through June 12.The mellow tones of such stars as the Ink Spots, Dinah Washington and Cab Calloway have been re-created by 12 talented singers who also emulate such memorable groups as the Platters, the Supremes, the Temptations and the Drifters.
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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | March 31, 2009
The image of a man who championed Pennsylvania Avenue now looks down on the street he supported through years of teaching and advocacy. Nearly 100 people gathered at noon Monday to honor Alvin "Kirby" Brunson, who died a year ago at age 49 when the Wilson Street rowhouse he was renovating to become a community cultural center collapsed. Brunson worked for years to promote the history and culture of what was once Baltimore's largest African-American arts and entertainment district. "He loved this neighborhood," said his father, Abraham Brunson, who attended the ceremony with his wife, Ernestine.
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By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 7, 2005
James Hamlin still sees Pennsylvania Avenue in all its tumultuous splendor. This makes him a great visionary, or a sentimental dreamer. Or both. In his mind's eye, a kid named Little Stevie Wonder's opening at the Royal Theatre. The Temptations are strolling down the street, and the Four Tops are pausing to get their shoes shined, and Redd Foxx is still showing up to convulse audiences with laughter. Pennsylvania Avenue is in West Baltimore. Hamlin lives in Sykesville. That's some long-distance vision he has. He is 57 years old and left West Baltimore back in 1976.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 7, 2005
James Hamlin still sees Pennsylvania Avenue in all its tumultuous splendor. This makes him a great visionary, or a sentimental dreamer. Or both. In his mind's eye, a kid named Little Stevie Wonder's opening at the Royal Theatre. The Temptations are strolling down the street, and the Four Tops are pausing to get their shoes shined, and Redd Foxx is still showing up to convulse audiences with laughter. Pennsylvania Avenue is in West Baltimore. Hamlin lives in Sykesville. That's some long-distance vision he has. He is 57 years old and left West Baltimore back in 1976.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | March 31, 2009
The image of a man who championed Pennsylvania Avenue now looks down on the street he supported through years of teaching and advocacy. Nearly 100 people gathered at noon Monday to honor Alvin "Kirby" Brunson, who died a year ago at age 49 when the Wilson Street rowhouse he was renovating to become a community cultural center collapsed. Brunson worked for years to promote the history and culture of what was once Baltimore's largest African-American arts and entertainment district. "He loved this neighborhood," said his father, Abraham Brunson, who attended the ceremony with his wife, Ernestine.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 3, 1999
The Royal Theatre, the historic Pennsylvania Avenue auditorium that played host to countless musical acts in the 1940s and 1950s, is one of the stars of Barry Levinson's most recent film, "Liberty Heights." Levinson reconstructed the theater to stage a 1954 James Brown concert, one of the movie's most stirring scenes, and certainly one that brought back sweet memories of seeing Brown, Cab Calloway and other legends when Pennsylvania Avenue was at its cultural height.On Dec. 12, Levinson, Warner Bros.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 19, 1996
Bob Crowley has designed more than 50 theatrical productions in Britain and on Broadway, plus worked on music videos with Sting and on movies with Daniel Day-Lewis and Winona Ryder.But he's only designed one musical: the Royal National Theatre's production of "Carousel." And he's prouder of its opening sequence than anything else in his 15-year career."It's like a summation of things," he says. "I feel there was a synthesis between music and design and direction and choreography. . . . It was as if one mindset was at work."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 21, 1996
"Carousel" - a musical about the circularity of life has come full circle itself.Based on a 1909 European play, "Liliom" by Ferenc Molnar, it was musicalized and thoroughly Americanized in 1945 by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, who transported it from its Hungarian setting to the Maine coast.Now, the Europeans have made it their own again, as proved by the Royal National Theatre of Great Britain's splendid Tony Award-winning production at the Lyric Opera House through Sunday.The visual elements are the core of this beautifully realized revival.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | February 13, 1992
In the early 1960s, Pennsylvania Avenue was the cultural Nil of Baltimore's black community and the Sphinx Club shone like a diamond on that shimmering river of lights."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and By Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2002
A soft breeze ruffles the grass and weeds on the vacant lot on Pennsylvania Avenue where the Club Tijuana once filled the night with jazz. The Tijuana is long gone. But in this empty space there is room enough for the music to echo in the memory. "Everybody you could name, if they played in Baltimore, they played at the Tijuana," says Ruby Glover, who started singing on The Avenue something like 50 years ago. "It was just swinging all the time, all the time. The glamour. The gorgeous feeling.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 3, 1999
The Royal Theatre, the historic Pennsylvania Avenue auditorium that played host to countless musical acts in the 1940s and 1950s, is one of the stars of Barry Levinson's most recent film, "Liberty Heights." Levinson reconstructed the theater to stage a 1954 James Brown concert, one of the movie's most stirring scenes, and certainly one that brought back sweet memories of seeing Brown, Cab Calloway and other legends when Pennsylvania Avenue was at its cultural height.On Dec. 12, Levinson, Warner Bros.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 21, 1996
"Carousel" - a musical about the circularity of life has come full circle itself.Based on a 1909 European play, "Liliom" by Ferenc Molnar, it was musicalized and thoroughly Americanized in 1945 by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, who transported it from its Hungarian setting to the Maine coast.Now, the Europeans have made it their own again, as proved by the Royal National Theatre of Great Britain's splendid Tony Award-winning production at the Lyric Opera House through Sunday.The visual elements are the core of this beautifully realized revival.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 19, 1996
Bob Crowley has designed more than 50 theatrical productions in Britain and on Broadway, plus worked on music videos with Sting and on movies with Daniel Day-Lewis and Winona Ryder.But he's only designed one musical: the Royal National Theatre's production of "Carousel." And he's prouder of its opening sequence than anything else in his 15-year career."It's like a summation of things," he says. "I feel there was a synthesis between music and design and direction and choreography. . . . It was as if one mindset was at work."
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | June 4, 1991
The grand jazz days of the Royal Theatre on Pennsylvania Avenue are being revived in a glitzy new musical revue, "Sneakin' Out at the Royal," by Baltimorean Cherri Cunningham-Cragway. An Encore Dinner Theatre production, the show is playing at The Forum on Wednesday evenings through June 12.The mellow tones of such stars as the Ink Spots, Dinah Washington and Cab Calloway have been re-created by 12 talented singers who also emulate such memorable groups as the Platters, the Supremes, the Temptations and the Drifters.
NEWS
By BRENT JONES and BRENT JONES,SUN REPORTER | April 8, 2006
City officials pledged yesterday to raise the Billie Holiday Monument by six feet as part of a larger plan to bolster the intersection of Lafayette Avenue and Pennsylvania Avenue. Celebrating what would have been the 91st birthday of the jazz great, city planning director Otis Rolley III, along with leaders from the recreation and parks department, unveiled the new Billie Holiday Plaza in a 20-minute ceremony in the Upton neighborhood. Much of the development will take place on the northeast corner of the intersection, where a wall mural of Holiday will be painted and song lyrics will be paved into a new sidewalk in the park.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2013
Percy Nicholson, a retired co-owner of two West Baltimore cleaning establishments where he cared for the clothing of African-American performers who played the fabled Royal Theatre, died Monday of heart failure at Manor Care Falls Road. The Ashburton resident was 92. The son of a truck driver and a housekeeper, Mr. Nicholson was born in Baltimore and raised on West Lanvale Street. He was a 1939 graduate of George Washington Carver Vocational High School. In 1946, he went to work at Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point plant, where he worked in the open-hearth furnace until retiring in 1983.
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