Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRoyal Navy
IN THE NEWS

Royal Navy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2011
Cecil George Mateer, a retired machinist and Royal Navy veteran, died July 28 of pneumonia at Lorien of Bel Air. He was 90. Born and raised in Belfast, Ireland, Mr. Mateer ran away to the sea when he was 13, and served onboard windjammers as a cabin boy. He later was trained as a machinist and joined the British merchant service, working passenger liners. With the outbreak of World War II, he enlisted in the Royal Navy and served at sea and on land bases at Sierra Leone and Cairo.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 12, 2014
Canada may have given Baltimore a bi-centennial gift the other day when its prime minister announced the discovery of one of two Arctic exploration ships that were lost in the late 1840s. The two vessels, HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, were Royal Navy warships converted for use in Arctic exploration. Both names should be familiar to Baltimoreans because they belonged to two of the ships that participated in the bombardment of Ft. McHenry. The HMS Erebus that was lost in the Arctic was actually built in 1826 and named after the original Erebus that was here.
Advertisement
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 22, 2004
LONDON - Iran seized three small British Royal Navy boats and arrested all eight sailors on board yesterday, Iran's Foreign Ministry announced, saying that the boats had entered Iranian waters without permission. The British Defense Ministry confirmed that the Iranian government had seized the boats and detained the sailors after they entered Iranian waters. The boats were described as inflatable. The navy was delivering the three boats to the Iraqi Riverine Patrol Service when the eight sailors from the Royal Navy training team were stopped on the Shatt-al-Arab, a stretch of water that marks the southern boundary between Iran and Iraq.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
Sometimes recognition for a job well done is a long time coming. Seventy years ago, Pasadena resident William Tiernan was an 18-year-old sailor in the British Merchant Navy, participating in one of World War II's most dangerous assignments, the Russian Arctic convoy. A couple of weeks ago, the 87-year-old Tiernan received special recognition for that duty with an Arctic Star Medal - an award only recently issued by the British government. "My opinion is that the merchant marine is not recognized like the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines are. That's why we didn't get no medals" until now, the British-born Tiernan said without any bitterness Still, he noted, "To this day, merchant marines cannot join the VFW. " The Russian Arctic convoy, in which Allied troops supplied the Soviet Union in its struggle against invading German forces, has often been referred to as a suicide mission.
NEWS
November 19, 1993
What a disaster for Baltimore should Mayor Schmoke heed the plea of three City Council members that he veto the show by bands of three British regiments at the Baltimore Arena Dec. 8.The bands have been touring this country uneventfully since September. But these alleged statesmen would have Baltimore say no.Britain is this country's closest ally and took part in our most recent war with Iraq. The Royal Navy joined the U.S. Navy off Haiti. But what do the State Department and Pentagon know?
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | June 25, 1995
NEWLYN, England -- "The Bloody Nut of Newlyn" taught his son well.Michael Williams would laugh at gales and set a course with nothing more than his watch, compass, map and guile, using wire stretched tight to hear the "ping-ping" of a school of fish waiting to be hauled from the sea.Now, the father remains ashore, as the son named Shaun sets sail, carrying on a 250-year-old family fishing tradition now hooked up to satellites and computers and bound by...
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | July 15, 1993
LONDON -- It is described as "one of the greatest calamities to befall the nation." It produced the most vexing and enduring mystery in the history of Arctic exploration.The catastrophe befell Sir John Franklin and the crews of his two ships, the Terror and Erebus, 129 men in all. They sailed from here in 1845 to find the Northwest Passage through the Arctic to the Pacific and Asia. The remains of six men were all that was ever found, though dozens of of expeditions have searched for them.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 23, 2004
TEHRAN, Iran - The fate of eight British sailors who were detained after being accused of entering Iranian territorial waters without permission remained unclear yesterday. A military official told state-run Al-Alam television yesterday morning that the Royal Navy crewmen would be prosecuted. But Defense Minister Ali Shamkhani said later that the matter would be resolved if it could be proved that they entered Iran's territorial waters by mistake. Three small boats with six sailors and two noncommissioned officers were seized Monday morning when they entered what Tehran says was the Iranian waters of Shatt Al Arab, which marks the border between Iran and Iraq.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | June 9, 1991
LONDON -- Fifty years after shooting it out with the Royal Navy in one of history's epic sea battles, the German battleship Bismarck is still revered as the greatest warship of its time.Peter Baynes should remember. He was a 19-year-old seaman aboard the battleship HMS King George V, the Royal Navy flagship that led the battle against the 50,000-ton behemoth."It was bigger, faster, more heavily armed than anything we had," Mr. Baynes recalled as he sat in a lounge at the Naval Club in London.
NEWS
September 12, 2014
Canada may have given Baltimore a bi-centennial gift the other day when its prime minister announced the discovery of one of two Arctic exploration ships that were lost in the late 1840s. The two vessels, HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, were Royal Navy warships converted for use in Arctic exploration. Both names should be familiar to Baltimoreans because they belonged to two of the ships that participated in the bombardment of Ft. McHenry. The HMS Erebus that was lost in the Arctic was actually built in 1826 and named after the original Erebus that was here.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2011
Cecil George Mateer, a retired machinist and Royal Navy veteran, died July 28 of pneumonia at Lorien of Bel Air. He was 90. Born and raised in Belfast, Ireland, Mr. Mateer ran away to the sea when he was 13, and served onboard windjammers as a cabin boy. He later was trained as a machinist and joined the British merchant service, working passenger liners. With the outbreak of World War II, he enlisted in the Royal Navy and served at sea and on land bases at Sierra Leone and Cairo.
NEWS
By Anthony Day and Anthony Day,Los Angeles Times | July 22, 2007
The Road to Samarcand An Adventure By Patrick O'Brian W.W. Norton / 270 pages / $25.95 In reissuing Patrick O'Brian's 1954 novel The Road to Samarcand, the late British author's publishers remind us of the secret of his success. He knew how to tell a story. Maybe it's a talent special to those islands off the northwest coast of the European continent, watered by Atlantic mist and three major and a few minor supple languages. Maybe it's a way of passing the long, damp seasons. More likely, as the anthropologists tell us, storytelling is a device to make some sense of multiple perceptions that, taken individually, produce childhood confusion.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,Los Angeles Times | January 13, 2007
LONDON -- With its armed forces severely strained by deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan, Britain must commit to major new defense expenditures if it intends to remain one of the world's premier military powers, Prime Minister Tony Blair said yesterday. The growing toll on the British military in the anti-terrorism fight, with reports of troops occasionally running low on ammunition, struggling with jammed weapons and going for weeks without hot meals, has put the nation at a crossroads.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 23, 2004
TEHRAN, Iran - The fate of eight British sailors who were detained after being accused of entering Iranian territorial waters without permission remained unclear yesterday. A military official told state-run Al-Alam television yesterday morning that the Royal Navy crewmen would be prosecuted. But Defense Minister Ali Shamkhani said later that the matter would be resolved if it could be proved that they entered Iran's territorial waters by mistake. Three small boats with six sailors and two noncommissioned officers were seized Monday morning when they entered what Tehran says was the Iranian waters of Shatt Al Arab, which marks the border between Iran and Iraq.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 22, 2004
LONDON - Iran seized three small British Royal Navy boats and arrested all eight sailors on board yesterday, Iran's Foreign Ministry announced, saying that the boats had entered Iranian waters without permission. The British Defense Ministry confirmed that the Iranian government had seized the boats and detained the sailors after they entered Iranian waters. The boats were described as inflatable. The navy was delivering the three boats to the Iraqi Riverine Patrol Service when the eight sailors from the Royal Navy training team were stopped on the Shatt-al-Arab, a stretch of water that marks the southern boundary between Iran and Iraq.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 27, 2004
PORTSMOUTH, England - Colin Nhennah is 74 and has lived here in the south of England his entire life, in the county called Hampshire. He is pretty sure he knew that people from his area colonized what is now part of the Northeast of the United States. As far as he's concerned, though, nobody from his side of the Atlantic can be blamed for the peculiar U.S. presidential election system, which today focuses on New Hampshire, his home's namesake. "As far as I'm concerned," Nhennah said, puffing on his pipe and sitting on his bar stool at the Ship Anson pub on Portsmouth's waterfront, "we have a cuckoo government over here and you have a cuckoo government over there, and any election that put those governments in power is cuckoo itself."
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,Los Angeles Times | January 13, 2007
LONDON -- With its armed forces severely strained by deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan, Britain must commit to major new defense expenditures if it intends to remain one of the world's premier military powers, Prime Minister Tony Blair said yesterday. The growing toll on the British military in the anti-terrorism fight, with reports of troops occasionally running low on ammunition, struggling with jammed weapons and going for weeks without hot meals, has put the nation at a crossroads.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John E. McIntyre and By John E. McIntyre,Sun Staff | November 24, 2002
Samuel Pepys: The Unequalled Self, by Claire Tomalin. Knopf, 448 pages, $30. No one agrees on when the modern era began. The 17th century, when Francis Bacon heralded the rise of science? The rise of a literate middle class in the 18th century? Or 1789, when the French Revolution led to the secular state? Claire Tomalin thinks that the modern era began Jan. 1, 1660, when Samuel Pepys began writing literature's most celebrated diary. That diary, she says, shows Pepys to be the first modern man. Unlike the Puritan diarists who preceded him, Pepys does not appear much interested in the examination of conscience.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.