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By Elizabeth Large | May 21, 1995
Next Friday the Baltimore-based Royal Furniture will open its third location, the Royal Furniture Factory Clearance Outlet in Rockville. The new store will sell discontinued upholstery and occasional pieces at wholesale or below. (Royal carries manufacturers like Century, Henredon, Hickory Chair, Lane, Lexington and Stanley.)The Rockville Royal, located at 11810 Parklawn Drive, will be open weekends beginning Friday. Hours are noon to 9 p.m. on Fridays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturdays, and noon to 6 p.m. on Sundays.
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BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1998
Royal Furniture Co. Inc., which relocated to Columbia after more than a century in Baltimore, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, with liabilities of $2 million, and assets of about $1.5 million.The furniture store left its city location on South Monroe Street with much fanfare earlier this year, saying it was difficult to draw customers to the Southwest Baltimore location.Yesterday, Michael Meadows -- the former vice president who was named president of Royal three weeks ago as part of the company's reorganization -- said doing business in the city was also very expensive.
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NEWS
December 26, 1997
ROYAL FURNITURE Co.'s decision to leave West Baltimore after 106 years is another blow to the city. Sixty-five sales, office and warehouse jobs will move to the suburbs when the high-end retailer relocates its main store to Columbia.Royal, a fourth-generation family business, is following the money. That's understandable. But its departure underscores how shopping choices are steadily narrowing with the middle-class exodus from Baltimore.Not only has the city lost all major department stores, but many residents find it increasingly difficult to find everyday hardware items or books.
NEWS
December 26, 1997
ROYAL FURNITURE Co.'s decision to leave West Baltimore after 106 years is another blow to the city. Sixty-five sales, office and warehouse jobs will move to the suburbs when the high-end retailer relocates its main store to Columbia.Royal, a fourth-generation family business, is following the money. That's understandable. But its departure underscores how shopping choices are steadily narrowing with the middle-class exodus from Baltimore.Not only has the city lost all major department stores, but many residents find it increasingly difficult to find everyday hardware items or books.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1997
Royal Furniture Co., the high-end retailer that made a name as a wholesaler catering to interior designers and customers by invitation, plans to pull up its century-old Baltimore roots and move to Columbia early next year.The fourth-generation family business, a Southwest Baltimore institution that opened its block-long showroom to the public three years ago to boost business, will sell the 100,000-square-foot building and lease a smaller store in Dobbin Center in Howard County.It has become increasingly difficult to draw customers to the South Monroe Street location, said Mike Meadows, vice president and general manager.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1998
Royal Furniture Co. Inc., which relocated to Columbia after more than a century in Baltimore, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, with liabilities of $2 million, and assets of about $1.5 million.The furniture store left its city location on South Monroe Street with much fanfare earlier this year, saying it was difficult to draw customers to the Southwest Baltimore location.Yesterday, Michael Meadows -- the former vice president who was named president of Royal three weeks ago as part of the company's reorganization -- said doing business in the city was also very expensive.
NEWS
By Susan Schoenberger | October 25, 1990
Ernestine Briggs held a candle, shielding it from the wind, and bowed her head last night to pray for Aaron Levenson, a furniture company executive fatally shot on the street in Southwest Baltimore.Mrs. Briggs, of Irvington, was a stranger to the Levenson family. But she came to join 35 people in remembering the 30-year-old father of two who was slain Oct. 3 in an apparent robbery attempt in front of the family business, Royal Furniture Co. in the 500 block of South Monroe Street.She came because her 14-year-old grandson was killed when he got caught in the cross-fire of a shooting in Baltimore in August 1989.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | October 2, 1994
Heritage File: history on a cardThe pretty little box covered in Florentine paper holds a lot of history. It's called the Heritage File, and it contains 200 cards and dividers on which you can record the background of family heirlooms and gifts. Each card has spaces for classification, description, value, source of information and other categories of the item. For instance, a relish tray inherited from your aunt might have "Depression glass" as the classification, "Miss America pattern" as the description, and so on.The Heritage File is sold at the Carriage House in Cockeysville and area museums such as the Maryland Historical Society.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg | October 6, 1990
Police investigators are still seeking a motive in the shooting death Thursday of a 30-year-old executive of a Southwest Baltimore furniture company, but they believe the murder may have been an execution rather than an attempted robbery, a police spokesman said yesterday."
NEWS
By Alisa Samuelsand Joe Nawrozki and Alisa Samuelsand Joe Nawrozki,Evening Sun Staff William B. Talbott contributed to this story | October 5, 1990
Teams of city homicide detectives today continued an around-the-clock investigation of the shooting death yesterday of the 30-year-old vice president of a southwest Baltimore furniture business."
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1997
Royal Furniture Co., the high-end retailer that made a name as a wholesaler catering to interior designers and customers by invitation, plans to pull up its century-old Baltimore roots and move to Columbia early next year.The fourth-generation family business, a Southwest Baltimore institution that opened its block-long showroom to the public three years ago to boost business, will sell the 100,000-square-foot building and lease a smaller store in Dobbin Center in Howard County.It has become increasingly difficult to draw customers to the South Monroe Street location, said Mike Meadows, vice president and general manager.
FEATURES
June 9, 1996
September marks return of magazineNo other shelter magazine offered quite the glossy, voyeuristic pleasures of House & Garden. When it folded in 1993, devoted readers found there was nothing to take its place. But they can take heart -- with the September issue, the magazine will be back on the newsstands. It's being published by Conde Naste, with a whole new editorial staff.How-to clinicsDo-it-yourselfers, take note. Hechinger is offering free, hands-on clinics in June. Here's the schedule: June 13, 7 p.m., "Using Pool Chemicals"; June 15, 10 a.m., "Designing and Building a Water Garden"; June 20, 7 p.m., "How to Install a Water Heater"; June 22, 10 a.m., "Designing and Installing an Automatic Sprinkler System"; June 27, 7 p.m., "How to Install a Ceiling Fan"; June 29, 10 a.m., "Putting up a New Wooden Fence."
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | November 26, 1995
Royal Furniture has added another well-established, traditional line of furniture to its stores with the opening of its Pennsylvania House gallery, the only one in Baltimore. Pennsylvania House is known for its classically styled cherry, oak, pine and maple furniture and has recently expanded its line to include transitional designs and a variety of finishes, paints and crackles. The company also has introduced casual upholstery collections that complement its wooden furniture.Floral benefitFive local floral designers have been given five gracious homes in Ruxton to transform for the holidays.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | May 21, 1995
Next Friday the Baltimore-based Royal Furniture will open its third location, the Royal Furniture Factory Clearance Outlet in Rockville. The new store will sell discontinued upholstery and occasional pieces at wholesale or below. (Royal carries manufacturers like Century, Henredon, Hickory Chair, Lane, Lexington and Stanley.)The Rockville Royal, located at 11810 Parklawn Drive, will be open weekends beginning Friday. Hours are noon to 9 p.m. on Fridays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturdays, and noon to 6 p.m. on Sundays.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1995
New positions* Black & Decker appointed Carole Hofmeister Smith marketing communications manager for North American Accessories.* McCormick & Company named Gordon M. Stetz Jr. assistant treasurer for financial services.* Valu Food named Mike Mazziott director of grocery, H.B.C. and non-foods.* Royal Furniture had named Mike Meadows vice president and general manager.* Baker-Meekins Company said M. Alethea Spear has joined the staff of the financial advisory company.* The Patrick C. Kerr Appraisal Group Inc. appointed Scott H. White vice president and principal of the firm.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | April 9, 1995
People are starting to look for a little more royal treatment in their interior decorating. The current issue of House Beautiful is reporting a new interest in heraldic motifs like fleurs de lis, crowns and insignia. Susan Yager, president of Domestications, a mail-order catalog for the home, sees it as part of a return to elegance and a new take on opulence. "Luxury takes a light and airy turn," she says, "with loads of lace and lovely sheer fabrics that are printed with fleurs de lis."Drexel Heritage will introduce its Royal Country Retreats collection at this spring's home furnishings market at High Point, N.C. The Duke and Duchess of Marlborough and Lady Jane Churchill will attend the preview party.
FEATURES
June 9, 1996
September marks return of magazineNo other shelter magazine offered quite the glossy, voyeuristic pleasures of House & Garden. When it folded in 1993, devoted readers found there was nothing to take its place. But they can take heart -- with the September issue, the magazine will be back on the newsstands. It's being published by Conde Naste, with a whole new editorial staff.How-to clinicsDo-it-yourselfers, take note. Hechinger is offering free, hands-on clinics in June. Here's the schedule: June 13, 7 p.m., "Using Pool Chemicals"; June 15, 10 a.m., "Designing and Building a Water Garden"; June 20, 7 p.m., "How to Install a Water Heater"; June 22, 10 a.m., "Designing and Installing an Automatic Sprinkler System"; June 27, 7 p.m., "How to Install a Ceiling Fan"; June 29, 10 a.m., "Putting up a New Wooden Fence."
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | November 26, 1995
Royal Furniture has added another well-established, traditional line of furniture to its stores with the opening of its Pennsylvania House gallery, the only one in Baltimore. Pennsylvania House is known for its classically styled cherry, oak, pine and maple furniture and has recently expanded its line to include transitional designs and a variety of finishes, paints and crackles. The company also has introduced casual upholstery collections that complement its wooden furniture.Floral benefitFive local floral designers have been given five gracious homes in Ruxton to transform for the holidays.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | October 2, 1994
Heritage File: history on a cardThe pretty little box covered in Florentine paper holds a lot of history. It's called the Heritage File, and it contains 200 cards and dividers on which you can record the background of family heirlooms and gifts. Each card has spaces for classification, description, value, source of information and other categories of the item. For instance, a relish tray inherited from your aunt might have "Depression glass" as the classification, "Miss America pattern" as the description, and so on.The Heritage File is sold at the Carriage House in Cockeysville and area museums such as the Maryland Historical Society.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | October 8, 1992
Aaron Samuel Levenson died at the age of 30 on a sidewalk in Southwest Baltimore on Oct. 4, 1990 -- shot three times in a bungled holdup outside the family furniture business.Today, two years and four days after Joseph Levenson ran outside and saw his younger son's life bleeding away, the 72-year-old executive is unveiling a memorial in the only way a man who has spent his life selling furniture knows how.He's opening a furniture store.Aslan Valley Furniture Co., which occupies the old C. H. Lear's furniture store where the railroad tracks cross Seminary Avenue, derives its name from his son's initials, ASL, Joseph Levenson says.
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