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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2004
Henry Albert Bavister, a British "male war bride" who was an expert on World War II aircraft, died of heart disease July 2 at his daughter's Forest Hill home. The Dundalk resident was 92. Born in Luton, England, he served as an aircraft engineer in the Royal Air Force during World War II. He received the Malta George Cross, among other decorations, for service that included postings in Malta, India, Palestine, Africa, Egypt and Italy. While serving in the military, he came to Baltimore and was stationed at Harbor Field, now the Dundalk Marine Terminal.
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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | January 31, 2012
Atholton All-Metro offensive lineman Paul Federinko has been named to the first Military.com All-DoD Football Team. For his first two years of high school, Federinko, whose mother is an Air Force doctor, played in England. He started for Lakenheath High School, a Department of Defense school on the Royal Air Force base where his mother was stationed. The family moved back to the United States two years ago and Federinko, 6-foot-5, 310 pounds, has started for the Raiders ever since.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | February 10, 2008
Noel Blair Hunter Cochrane, founder and president of an industrial valve and filtering business, died of a respiratory ailment Feb. 3 at his Lutherville home. He was 88. Born in London on Christmas Day and known as Blair, he emigrated at age 3 with his family to the United States. His father, great-grandnephew of Adm. Lord Thomas Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald, was recruited to work in the United States. The elder Mr. Cochrane was chief financial officer of the newly opened Lord Baltimore Hotel.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | February 10, 2008
Noel Blair Hunter Cochrane, founder and president of an industrial valve and filtering business, died of a respiratory ailment Feb. 3 at his Lutherville home. He was 88. Born in London on Christmas Day and known as Blair, he emigrated at age 3 with his family to the United States. His father, great-grandnephew of Adm. Lord Thomas Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald, was recruited to work in the United States. The elder Mr. Cochrane was chief financial officer of the newly opened Lord Baltimore Hotel.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | January 31, 2012
Atholton All-Metro offensive lineman Paul Federinko has been named to the first Military.com All-DoD Football Team. For his first two years of high school, Federinko, whose mother is an Air Force doctor, played in England. He started for Lakenheath High School, a Department of Defense school on the Royal Air Force base where his mother was stationed. The family moved back to the United States two years ago and Federinko, 6-foot-5, 310 pounds, has started for the Raiders ever since.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2003
Vincent dePaul Gisriel Sr., whose World War II exploits as a B-17 bombardier on 32 missions over Germany earned him the Distinguished Flying Cross and other decorations, died of pneumonia Sunday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The 81-year-old retired district manager with Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. had lived at the Glen Meadows retirement community in Glen Arm since 2000. Mr. Gisriel was born and raised in East Baltimore and graduated in 1940 from Polytechnic Institute. He was working for C&P when he enlisted in the Army Air Forces in 1942.
NEWS
By Ed McDonough and Ed McDonough,Staff writer | October 6, 1991
The Mason-Dixon Rugby Club has forged strong international ties on atrip to Great Britain and two visits to Canada.That reputation will pay some dividends for Carroll residents Wednesday night, when Her Majesty's Royal Air Force team takes on Westminster-based Mason-Dixon at 7:30 at the North Carroll High stadium.Mike Gallagher, coach of the Mason-Dixon team, said the match wasarranged by the Potomac Rugby Union, which oversees the sport in this region. The British team is touring the East Coast, and also will compete against the Chesapeake Rugby Club next weekend in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 22, 2001
WIMBLEDON, England - If you chew gum, dress sloppily or harbor a hint of dirt on the soles of your tennis shoes, then you - prospective Wimbledon ball boy and ball girl - are in big trouble. Wally Wonfor is going to get you. He's going to yell and make an example of you. That's before you even get through the front door for Wonfor's terse introduction to the grueling 13-session tennis boot camp. "My name is Mr. Wonfor," he tells each new generation of would-be Wimbledon ball boys. "You can call me Sir."
NEWS
By Information for this column was compiled by Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's Library | November 13, 1994
25 Years Ago (week of Nov. 2-8, 1969)* The Howard County school board, faced with the fact that school site acquisition and land preparation would cost $5 million over the next 10 years, proposed to the county planning board that developers of new towns and planned communities be required to donate school sites ready for construction.* Construction at the General Electric Appliance Park in Columbia was halted as a result of GE's nationwide labor problems. Six workers from GE's Baltimore facility set up picket lines at each of the entrances to the Columbia site.
NEWS
July 19, 2009
HENRY ALLINGHAM, 113 World's oldest man, World War I veteran Henry Allingham, a World War I veteran who was the world's oldest man, died Saturday. He attributed his remarkable longevity to "cigarettes, whiskey and wild, wild women." He was the last surviving original member of the Royal Air Force, which was formed in 1918. He made it a personal crusade to talk about a conflict that wiped out much of a generation. Only a handful of World War I veterans remain of the estimated 68 million mobilized.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2004
Henry Albert Bavister, a British "male war bride" who was an expert on World War II aircraft, died of heart disease July 2 at his daughter's Forest Hill home. The Dundalk resident was 92. Born in Luton, England, he served as an aircraft engineer in the Royal Air Force during World War II. He received the Malta George Cross, among other decorations, for service that included postings in Malta, India, Palestine, Africa, Egypt and Italy. While serving in the military, he came to Baltimore and was stationed at Harbor Field, now the Dundalk Marine Terminal.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2003
Vincent dePaul Gisriel Sr., whose World War II exploits as a B-17 bombardier on 32 missions over Germany earned him the Distinguished Flying Cross and other decorations, died of pneumonia Sunday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The 81-year-old retired district manager with Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. had lived at the Glen Meadows retirement community in Glen Arm since 2000. Mr. Gisriel was born and raised in East Baltimore and graduated in 1940 from Polytechnic Institute. He was working for C&P when he enlisted in the Army Air Forces in 1942.
NEWS
By Ed McDonough and Ed McDonough,Staff writer | October 6, 1991
The Mason-Dixon Rugby Club has forged strong international ties on atrip to Great Britain and two visits to Canada.That reputation will pay some dividends for Carroll residents Wednesday night, when Her Majesty's Royal Air Force team takes on Westminster-based Mason-Dixon at 7:30 at the North Carroll High stadium.Mike Gallagher, coach of the Mason-Dixon team, said the match wasarranged by the Potomac Rugby Union, which oversees the sport in this region. The British team is touring the East Coast, and also will compete against the Chesapeake Rugby Club next weekend in Baltimore.
NEWS
February 12, 2005
Barbara M. Bauman, 78, real estate agent Barbara M. Bauman, a retired senior partner in a residential real estate business, died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Lou Gehrig's disease, Feb. 4 at her Hunt Valley home. She was 78. Born Barbara Mogg in London, she was drafted into the Women's Auxiliary Royal Air Force during World War II. She transmitted and decoded messages for British and American pilots. Among her duties, she sent a coded message for pilots who participated in the D-Day invasion of France.
NEWS
April 10, 2002
Alan James Dalby, a retired shipyard supervisor, died of heart failure Saturday at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. He was 69. Mr. Dalby, a Forest Hill resident who had earlier lived in Joppa, was born and raised in Yorkshire, England. He was a graduate of Yorkshire Technical College, earning a degree in mechanical engineering. In 1953 and 1954, he served in the Royal Air Force as a radar mechanic. He worked as a draftsman at a shipyard in Selby, England, before immigrating to Quebec in 1967.
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