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By Dale Austin and Dale Austin,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 28, 1990
ELMONT, N.Y. -- Jockey heroes of the United States an England helped earn two of the seven winning purses on Breeders' Cup day yesterday.Pat Day, known for sensational rides in the Midwest, found hole in midstretch and squeezed through with Unbridled to win the $3 million Breeders' Cup Classic.Although he had won the Kentucky Derby and was a celebrate3-year-old, Unbridled paid $15.20 as fourth choice in a field of 14.Day broke on the extreme outside with Unbridled, but quicklgot the colt near the rail and kept him there until he swung out to split horses and beat long-shot Ibn Bey by a length.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 24, 2001
Once upon a time, orchestras routinely welcomed new music to complement all the Beethoven being played; this tradition of experimenting and stretching ears slowly eroded away in the 20th century. Today, the chances of hearing a freshly composed score on a symphony program have grown dangerously, pathetically slim in many parts of the country. One bright spot is in Washington, where the National Symphony Orchestra has long made contemporary music a cornerstone of its operations, thanks to the John and June Hechinger Commissioning Fund for New Orchestral Works.
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NEWS
July 5, 2001
ANYONE who missed the exhibition of 19th and 20th century French art from the Baltimore Museum of Art and Walters Art Museum permanent collections, shown together here in the spring of 2000, can catch it in London at the Royal Academy of Arts. What with the effect of mad cow and foot-and-mouth diseases on tourism to the English countryside, air fare bargains to London may be more readily available than in most tourist seasons. London is not without incredible riches in French art of the period.
NEWS
July 5, 2001
ANYONE who missed the exhibition of 19th and 20th century French art from the Baltimore Museum of Art and Walters Art Museum permanent collections, shown together here in the spring of 2000, can catch it in London at the Royal Academy of Arts. What with the effect of mad cow and foot-and-mouth diseases on tourism to the English countryside, air fare bargains to London may be more readily available than in most tourist seasons. London is not without incredible riches in French art of the period.
NEWS
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 1998
Outside a nondescript building in the Oakland Ridge Industrial Center in Columbia, the minivans are clustered like a herd of manatees at feeding time.Almost the entire enrollment of the Ballet Royale Academy is here for rehearsal: tiny children dressed as ladybugs in red tutus with black polka dots and serious teen-agers in pointe shoes, their hair smoothed back into chignons. Because few of the dancers are old enough to drive, their parents are here, too.Ballet Royale's spring production, which will have two performances Saturday, is "Alice in Wonderland."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 2, 1997
LONDON -- The Royal Academy of Arts is normally a serene place, its ornate galleries filled with old masterworks and elegant sculptures that appeal to an avid though generally elderly audience.Not this fall, though.The academy has opened its doors to the young stars of the British art world, and they have turned this institution upside down with a temporary exhibition called "Sensation." They are showing off pickled animals, mutilated mannequins and a portrait of a convicted child killer, created from a child's handprints.
SPORTS
By Paul Moran and Paul Moran,Newsday | October 21, 1990
The British riding legend, Lester Piggott, 5, who recently launched a comeback after five years in retirement, has a Breeders' Cup mount.Piggott, who served less than two years in a British prison after being convicted on income-tax evasion charges, began his comeback Tuesday at Chepstow, Wales, where he won two races.On Wednesday, he was offered the mount on Royal Academy in the Breeders' Cup Mile by trainer Vincent O'Brien, for whom he has ridden four English Derby winners. O'Brien reviewed videotapes of Piggott's races at Chepstow before offering the assignment, which became available when Royal Academy's usual rider, John Reid, injured his collarbone.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 28, 2001
LONDON - Around here, the word Baltimore conjures up a city with English roots located somewhere around Washington. It's known as the home of John Waters, Anne Tyler, Cal Ripken, the cop show "Homicide," the Ravens and Wallis Warfield Simpson, who fell for the Prince of Wales, the future though short-reigning King Edward VIII. But Baltimore's image is about to get a big boost in Britain courtesy of a stunning exhibit poised to open at the Royal Academy of Arts in the heart of London. "Ingres to Matisse: Masterpieces of French Painting" is drawn from the collections of the Walters Art Museum and the Baltimore Museum of Art. The show displays a different side of Baltimore, one not as well understood or publicized in Europe.
NEWS
October 6, 1991
Her words bring to life the song of a weaver bird, the bloom of a jacaranda tree, the red dust rising from the road. They tell of squalor and beauty. Of men and women, whites and blacks, young and old, Communists and liberals and reactionaries, trapped in their worlds together and apart. Of fear and lost hope.This is the seventh decade in which Nadine Gordimer has been a published author, no mean trick considering that she is only 67. A South African magazine published a story of hers in 1939, when she was 15. The New Yorker magazine published its first Gordimer story in 1950.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 24, 2001
Once upon a time, orchestras routinely welcomed new music to complement all the Beethoven being played; this tradition of experimenting and stretching ears slowly eroded away in the 20th century. Today, the chances of hearing a freshly composed score on a symphony program have grown dangerously, pathetically slim in many parts of the country. One bright spot is in Washington, where the National Symphony Orchestra has long made contemporary music a cornerstone of its operations, thanks to the John and June Hechinger Commissioning Fund for New Orchestral Works.
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 28, 2001
LONDON - Around here, the word Baltimore conjures up a city with English roots located somewhere around Washington. It's known as the home of John Waters, Anne Tyler, Cal Ripken, the cop show "Homicide," the Ravens and Wallis Warfield Simpson, who fell for the Prince of Wales, the future though short-reigning King Edward VIII. But Baltimore's image is about to get a big boost in Britain courtesy of a stunning exhibit poised to open at the Royal Academy of Arts in the heart of London. "Ingres to Matisse: Masterpieces of French Painting" is drawn from the collections of the Walters Art Museum and the Baltimore Museum of Art. The show displays a different side of Baltimore, one not as well understood or publicized in Europe.
NEWS
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 1998
Outside a nondescript building in the Oakland Ridge Industrial Center in Columbia, the minivans are clustered like a herd of manatees at feeding time.Almost the entire enrollment of the Ballet Royale Academy is here for rehearsal: tiny children dressed as ladybugs in red tutus with black polka dots and serious teen-agers in pointe shoes, their hair smoothed back into chignons. Because few of the dancers are old enough to drive, their parents are here, too.Ballet Royale's spring production, which will have two performances Saturday, is "Alice in Wonderland."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 2, 1997
LONDON -- The Royal Academy of Arts is normally a serene place, its ornate galleries filled with old masterworks and elegant sculptures that appeal to an avid though generally elderly audience.Not this fall, though.The academy has opened its doors to the young stars of the British art world, and they have turned this institution upside down with a temporary exhibition called "Sensation." They are showing off pickled animals, mutilated mannequins and a portrait of a convicted child killer, created from a child's handprints.
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Contributing Writer | May 20, 1994
The Ballet Royale Academy's benefit performance of "The Secret Garden" demonstrates what the executive director sees as its mission: philanthropy meeting choreography."
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | June 27, 1993
After her visit to the recent exhibition of paintings by theImpressionist master Alfred Sisley, Mary Rozenburg of Los Altos, Calif., paused to write in the visitors' comment book:"Sisley must be smiling indeed to see so many of his children in one place -- one hundred years later."The children she had in mind, no doubt, were the 61 Sisley paintings assembled from around the world by the Walters Art Gallery, the Musee D'Orsay in Paris and the British Royal Academy of Art in London.She might have been been surprised to know that real descendants of the English artist were on hand as well.
NEWS
October 6, 1991
Her words bring to life the song of a weaver bird, the bloom of a jacaranda tree, the red dust rising from the road. They tell of squalor and beauty. Of men and women, whites and blacks, young and old, Communists and liberals and reactionaries, trapped in their worlds together and apart. Of fear and lost hope.This is the seventh decade in which Nadine Gordimer has been a published author, no mean trick considering that she is only 67. A South African magazine published a story of hers in 1939, when she was 15. The New Yorker magazine published its first Gordimer story in 1950.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | June 27, 1993
After her visit to the recent exhibition of paintings by theImpressionist master Alfred Sisley, Mary Rozenburg of Los Altos, Calif., paused to write in the visitors' comment book:"Sisley must be smiling indeed to see so many of his children in one place -- one hundred years later."The children she had in mind, no doubt, were the 61 Sisley paintings assembled from around the world by the Walters Art Gallery, the Musee D'Orsay in Paris and the British Royal Academy of Art in London.She might have been been surprised to know that real descendants of the English artist were on hand as well.
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Contributing Writer | May 20, 1994
The Ballet Royale Academy's benefit performance of "The Secret Garden" demonstrates what the executive director sees as its mission: philanthropy meeting choreography."
SPORTS
By Dale Austin and Dale Austin,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 28, 1990
ELMONT, N.Y. -- Jockey heroes of the United States an England helped earn two of the seven winning purses on Breeders' Cup day yesterday.Pat Day, known for sensational rides in the Midwest, found hole in midstretch and squeezed through with Unbridled to win the $3 million Breeders' Cup Classic.Although he had won the Kentucky Derby and was a celebrate3-year-old, Unbridled paid $15.20 as fourth choice in a field of 14.Day broke on the extreme outside with Unbridled, but quicklgot the colt near the rail and kept him there until he swung out to split horses and beat long-shot Ibn Bey by a length.
SPORTS
By Paul Moran and Paul Moran,Newsday | October 21, 1990
The British riding legend, Lester Piggott, 5, who recently launched a comeback after five years in retirement, has a Breeders' Cup mount.Piggott, who served less than two years in a British prison after being convicted on income-tax evasion charges, began his comeback Tuesday at Chepstow, Wales, where he won two races.On Wednesday, he was offered the mount on Royal Academy in the Breeders' Cup Mile by trainer Vincent O'Brien, for whom he has ridden four English Derby winners. O'Brien reviewed videotapes of Piggott's races at Chepstow before offering the assignment, which became available when Royal Academy's usual rider, John Reid, injured his collarbone.
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