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By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
North Carolina coach Roy Williams says he "hates to see" Maryland departing the Atlantic Coast Conference. The teams have played 178 times since 1924, but with the Terps headed to the Big Ten after this season, Tuesday night's game at the Smith Center will be the final regular season ACC game in the series. "I still think of Maryland as an ACC school and I'll always think that way," Williams said Monday during the ACC coaches' teleconference. "I hate to see them leaving, but their administration made a decision that they think is best for their school.
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By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
North Carolina coach Roy Williams says he "hates to see" Maryland departing the Atlantic Coast Conference. The teams have played 178 times since 1924, but with the Terps headed to the Big Ten after this season, Tuesday night's game at the Smith Center will be the final regular season ACC game in the series. "I still think of Maryland as an ACC school and I'll always think that way," Williams said Monday during the ACC coaches' teleconference. "I hate to see them leaving, but their administration made a decision that they think is best for their school.
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By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2003
NEW ORLEANS - Even after losing a key post player, the Kansas Jayhawks never doubted they had the ability to return to college basketball's top event. Even though they toil in the relative anonymity of Conference USA and had not participated in these surroundings in more than a quarter-century, the Marquette Golden Eagles envisioned themselves here months ago. Something must give tonight in a Final Four matchup with no shortage of subplots. Kansas, one of the game's more storied programs, has a first-team All-American in senior forward Nick Collison, a scrappy scorer and defender in senior guard Kirk Hinrich, and a 15-year success story in coach Roy Williams, who might not be working in Lawrence much longer.
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By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
Mark Turgeon had to pause and collect himself while proudly recounting how his bench players rallied in Maryland's double-overtime loss to Miami - a game in which the coach was ejected and spent the extra periods in the locker room receiving texts and trying vainly to follow what was unfolding on the court. Turgeon - who faces a mentor in North Carolina coach Roy Williamsat Comcast Center on Saturday  - spent Friday's media session looking back to the bizarre Miami game and looking ahead to going against Williams for the first time.
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By From Sun news services | October 15, 2008
Dallas Cowboys cornerback Adam Jones was suspended for at least four games by the NFL yesterday for violating the league's personal-conduct policy. NFL commissioner Roger Goodell will determine the full length of the suspension after the Cowboys' game in Washington on Nov. 16. "If he earns his way to a point that he can be considered to play again, then I would support that," Cowboys owner Jerry Jones said. "Frankly, just as he earned through his behavior the right to get back in and play a few weeks ago, he would have to earn that."
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By Don Markus | March 27, 1993
INDIANA (31-3) vs. KANSAS (28-6)Site: St. Louis ArenaTime: 6 p.m.TV: Channels 11, 9Coaches: Indiana, Bob Knight (619-213 in 28 years overall, 517-163 in 22 years at Indiana); Kansas, Roy Williams (130-36 in five years)Analysis: This matchup of college basketball blue-bloods -- Kansas is the third-winningest program, Indiana the fourth -- should be a test for both teams. Can the Jayhawks stop Calbert Cheaney? Can the Hoosiers slow down Rex Walters? If Kansas forwards Richard Scott and Darrin Hancock recover from their respective sprained ankles, the Jayhawks could have a little too much depth and muscle for the Hoosiers inside.
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By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2005
ST. LOUIS -- North Carolina coach Roy Williams reminded Sean May about the date of the national championship game even before the season began. May didn't say anything to his teammates but it was then when he started envisioning the ultimate 21st birthday party. The 6-foot-9, 260-pound junior center lived out that fantasy last night, climbing a ladder at the Edward Jones Dome to cut down a piece of the net after leading the Tar Heels to a 75-70 victory over top-ranked Illinois at the Edward Jones Dome.
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By MIKE PRESTON | March 30, 2002
ATLANTA - When Maryland meets Kansas tonight in the NCAA semifinals, it's a matchup of two of the most prominent programs in the country and two of the nation's best coaches. It's a shame that one of the Williams boys has to lose, too bad that one of the top coaches will be denied an opportunity in the profession's ultimate event, the national championship game. It's a story of two coaches who share more than the same last name. Gary at Maryland and Roy at Kansas. Seven schools have reached the NCAA tournament round of 16 at least six times in the past nine seasons, and two of them are Maryland and Kansas.
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By Ken Murrayand Milton Kent and Ken Murrayand Milton Kent,Evening Sun Staff | March 27, 1991
That North Carolina should meet Kansas in the Final Four on Saturday is a matchup filled with delicious irony. It is more than Dean Smith coaching against his former assistant, Roy Williams. It is more than the two programs running mirror offenses.Smith has deep-rooted ties to Kansas. He was born in Emporia, (( Kan., 60 years ago. He played under the legendary Phog Allen at the University of Kansas in the early 1950s. He was a member of Kansas' 1952 national championship team.And when Kansas twice was coach hunting in the last decade, it was Smith's advice the Jayhawks sought.
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By PAUL MCMULLEN | November 18, 2005
Coach: Roy Williams, third season at school (52-15), 18th overall (470-116) 2004-05 record: 33-4, 14-2 (first in ACC; NCAA champion) Returning starters: None Sun prediction: NIT Why it will happen: The last time the NCAA champion didn't return to the NCAA field was 1987, when Louisville couldn't rebound. Williams had the most gifted team in the nation, but the personnel losses went beyond the NBA first-round foursome, to guys like Jawad Williams and Melvin Scott. What's left is the most inexperienced team in Tar Heels history.
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By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2011
Not even Mark Turgeon's wife had anticipated he was ready to leave Texas A&M to become Maryland's next men's basketball coach. Maryland athletic director Kevin Anderson had moved on in his coaching search, believing Turgeon wasn't interested. But there the newly hired Turgeon was Wednesday, wearing a tie he hoped approximated Maryland red and convincing administrators, boosters and the media Wednesday that, yes, he's thrilled to succeed Gary Williams in coaching the Terps. Yes, he can't wait to play against his mentor, North Carolina coach Roy Williams.
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By Jeff Barker and Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2011
In the summer of 1983, an undersized, unrecruited point guard arrived unannounced in new coach Larry Brown's office at Kansas. After talking with him for a few moments, Brown gave Mark Turgeon a spot on the team. "I beat [Division II] Washburn for him," Brown joked. "He had gone to the basketball camp at Kansas for years and he said, 'Coach, I'm as good or better than any of the guards you have.' He was about 5-7 and about 140 pounds. He probably grew to 5-9 and 160. He ended up starting for me as a freshman when another freshman became ineligible and we wound up winning the Big 8. " Twenty-eight years later, Turgeon, 46, — who will be formally introduced as Maryland's men's basketball coach at noon Wednesday at Comcast Center — still possesses a feistiness often associated with smaller players in a big man's game.
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By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2011
Maryland on Monday night hired Texas A&M coach Mark Turgeon -- a Larry Brown disciple at Kansas who has been likened to Gary Williams -- to replace Williams as men's basketball coach. Turgeon, 46, was hired after being interviewed by athletic director Kevin Anderson in Pittsburgh. Turgeon then flew home to Texas, and Maryland delayed an announcement until he could talk to his team. Turgeon made his name at Wichita State, then went 97-40 in four seasons in College Station with four NCAA tournament trips.
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Peter Schmuck | May 5, 2011
Longtime Maryland basketball coach Gary Williams explained his sudden decision to retire Thursday in terms that anybody could understand, and — with all due respect for his Hall of Fame-worthy career — I still don't understand it. "It's the right time," he said in a news release. Frankly, I can't think of a worse time, either for the coaching legend that is Gary Williams at Maryland or the Terrapins men's basketball program that he pulled out of the ashes 22 years ago and maintained at a level of national prominence for nearly a generation.
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By From Sun news services | October 15, 2008
Dallas Cowboys cornerback Adam Jones was suspended for at least four games by the NFL yesterday for violating the league's personal-conduct policy. NFL commissioner Roger Goodell will determine the full length of the suspension after the Cowboys' game in Washington on Nov. 16. "If he earns his way to a point that he can be considered to play again, then I would support that," Cowboys owner Jerry Jones said. "Frankly, just as he earned through his behavior the right to get back in and play a few weeks ago, he would have to earn that."
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April 1, 2007
If I were a big-name college coach at the Final Four, the one place I would try to avoid at all costs would be my own hotel. The Hilton across the street is the coaches' hotel, and another reporter and I wandered over there yesterday morning for about two hours to check out the scene. The place is like a crowded airport, only filled with familiar faces. Here are a few sightings: Bruce Pearl - NOT wearing his usual orange, caused quite a stir around the rumor mill. Roy Williams - Breezed through but stopped to sign a few autographs.
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By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2001
The new coach had taken the school to its first NCAA tournament in his second year, but after two straight opening-round defeats and another loss in the team's first tournament game in his seventh season, some wondered whether this former All-America hotshot from Purdue had what it took to be considered among the nation's top college basketball coaches. Even a fellow named John Wooden had to get over the hump. The scrutiny of coaches and their teams has intensified greatly since the days of Wooden trying to revive a substandard program at UCLA in the early 1950s, given that college basketball has ballooned into a billion-dollar business and the tournament itself has become a monster that takes over the sporting world every March.
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By PAUL MCMULLEN | March 13, 2006
GOING TO INDIANAPOLIS Tennessee picked the wrong time to slump. North Carolina is too inexperienced. It's a year too late for Illinois and Washington, and Michigan State has been spotty the last month. The door is wide open for Connecticut to blow through Philadelphia and the MCI Center and get to its third Final Four in eight years. The Huskies have Rudy Gay and the nation's most talented front line, two good spot-up shooters and a slick point guard in Marcus Williams. If they don't have an attitude after getting bumped out of the Big East tournament early, they never will.
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By PAUL MCMULLEN | March 13, 2006
GOING TO INDIANAPOLIS Tennessee picked the wrong time to slump. North Carolina is too inexperienced. It's a year too late for Illinois and Washington, and Michigan State has been spotty the last month. The door is wide open for Connecticut to blow through Philadelphia and the MCI Center and get to its third Final Four in eight years. The Huskies have Rudy Gay and the nation's most talented front line, two good spot-up shooters and a slick point guard in Marcus Williams. If they don't have an attitude after getting bumped out of the Big East tournament early, they never will.
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March 11, 2006
Puckett stood tall; Bonds is a disgrace Two people made baseball news last week, but both were for entirely antithetical reasons. First, there was the sobering news of Kirby Puckett's death. What he did for baseball and the Minnesota Twins organization was nothing short of phenomenal. Because of his intense desire to win and his effervescent persona, he took the lowly, small-market Twins to two World Series championships in his shortened career. The legacy of his accomplishments is still alive in the Twins, who simply field winning teams year after year.
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