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NEWS
August 31, 1993
Woman, 32, carjacked in parking lotA Baltimore woman narrowly escaped injury in the parking lot of the Annapolis Plaza on Sunday when two men robbed her of her car and drove off as she held onto the key, county police said yesterday.The 32-year-old victim told police she was getting out of her car in the shopping center lot off Jennifer Road about 4:30 p.m. when two men walked up to her.She said she recognized one of them as someone she dated five years ago. That man began hitting the woman, grabbed her and pulled her out of the car, she said.
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NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 15, 1995
William H. Gray III left Congress four years ago. When Rep. Kweisi Mfume called him last week, Mr. Gray knew what Mr. Mfume's questions would be. He also had some answers.Why, many people wondered back in 1991, would Mr. Gray leave his House position to move to the United Negro College Fund? To Mr. Gray, who was being mentioned as a vice presidential candidate, as perhaps the first black speaker of the House, the issue was bewildering. He never believed Congress was the only place to do important work.
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NEWS
December 7, 1994
Aminda Badeau Wilkins, 89, a retired welfare official and the widow of Roy Wilkins, longtime executive secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, died Saturday at New York University Medical Center after a brief illness. Mrs. Wilkins, who lived in Jamaica, N.Y., retired in 1971 as an assistant commissioner in the New York City Department of Welfare. Mr. Wilkins died in 1981.John Fearnley, 80, a stage manager and director closely identified with the work of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, died of cancer Nov. 29 at his home in Manhattan.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1995
Rep. Kweisi Mfume spent the night before he was named NAACP president registered in a Washington hotel under the assumed name Charles Newday.For Earl G. Graves, the magazine publisher and Mfume confidant who coined it, the name was significant: It was a new day not only for the beleaguered National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, but also for the 47-year-old Baltimore congressman.Mr. Mfume was moving beyond the confines of Maryland's 7th District (inner-city Baltimore and western Baltimore County)
NEWS
July 18, 1995
The audit report of NAACP finances confirms the worst fears about fiscal mismanagement and waste by the venerable civil rights group's former top officials, ousted Executive Director Benjamin F. Chavis and Board President William F. Gibson.According to the report, Messrs. Chavis and Gibson together charged more than half a million dollars in expenses for such items as limousine rentals, fancy hotels and gifts to friends and relatives that included such personal items as toys, maternity clothing, electronic games and furniture.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1995
Rep. Kweisi Mfume spent the night before he was named NAACP president registered in a Washington hotel under the assumed name Charles Newday.For Earl G. Graves, the magazine publisher and Mfume confidant who coined it, the name was significant: It was a new day not only for the beleaguered National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, but also for the 47-year-old Baltimore congressman.Mr. Mfume was moving beyond the confines of Maryland's 7th District (inner-city Baltimore and western Baltimore County)
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1995
The beleaguered NAACP's search for an executive director could end as early as today, when its board of directors meets in Baltimore.The nation's oldest and largest civil rights group, which is struggling to shed a deficit of more than $3 million, has lacked an executive director since August 1994, when the board fired the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., who was alleged to have mishandled funds.A seven-member committee began seeking Dr. Chavis' successor in July, with help from a Chicago executive-search firm.
NEWS
By Jack L. Levin | May 26, 1993
OH, what a time it was 30 years ago!That year, 1963, was a watershed, turbulent, earth-shaking year when the president was assassinated and the civil rights revolution roared to a climax. Some of us thought of it as a new beginning.I remember an uncannily prophetic sermon by my rabbi and friend, Morris Lieberman of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, on April 12. More than a year before passage of the civil rights bill and more than five years before America's cities erupted in the 1968 racial conflagration, Rabbi Lieberman spoke presciently to an audience not altogether sympathetic.
NEWS
By GREGORY P. KANE | September 10, 1993
"Where,'' Reginald Denny might be asking himself, ''is my invitation to join the NAACP?''If he is, it's a darned good question, one that NAACP executive director Ben Chavis might consider answering by extending the same invitation to Reginald Denny to join the NAACP that Chavis extended to Rodney King.Mr. Denny, for those of you who've just beamed in from a distant planet, is the unfortunate white truck driver who had the misfortune to be at the corner of Florence and Normandie avenues on April 29, 1992, the day the Los Angeles riots began.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 15, 1995
William H. Gray III left Congress four years ago. When Rep. Kweisi Mfume called him last week, Mr. Gray knew what Mr. Mfume's questions would be. He also had some answers.Why, many people wondered back in 1991, would Mr. Gray leave his House position to move to the United Negro College Fund? To Mr. Gray, who was being mentioned as a vice presidential candidate, as perhaps the first black speaker of the House, the issue was bewildering. He never believed Congress was the only place to do important work.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1995
The beleaguered NAACP's search for an executive director could end as early as today, when its board of directors meets in Baltimore.The nation's oldest and largest civil rights group, which is struggling to shed a deficit of more than $3 million, has lacked an executive director since August 1994, when the board fired the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., who was alleged to have mishandled funds.A seven-member committee began seeking Dr. Chavis' successor in July, with help from a Chicago executive-search firm.
NEWS
July 18, 1995
The audit report of NAACP finances confirms the worst fears about fiscal mismanagement and waste by the venerable civil rights group's former top officials, ousted Executive Director Benjamin F. Chavis and Board President William F. Gibson.According to the report, Messrs. Chavis and Gibson together charged more than half a million dollars in expenses for such items as limousine rentals, fancy hotels and gifts to friends and relatives that included such personal items as toys, maternity clothing, electronic games and furniture.
NEWS
December 7, 1994
Aminda Badeau Wilkins, 89, a retired welfare official and the widow of Roy Wilkins, longtime executive secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, died Saturday at New York University Medical Center after a brief illness. Mrs. Wilkins, who lived in Jamaica, N.Y., retired in 1971 as an assistant commissioner in the New York City Department of Welfare. Mr. Wilkins died in 1981.John Fearnley, 80, a stage manager and director closely identified with the work of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, died of cancer Nov. 29 at his home in Manhattan.
NEWS
By JAMES BOCK | July 31, 1994
America's newest civil rights leader wasn't born poor like Rep. Kweisi Mfume. He didn't march with Martin Luther King Jr. like the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson. He doesn't favor black separatism like Louis Farrakhan. And he never did time in prison like the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr.Hugh B. Price, the new president of the National Urban League, was born into prosperity as the son of a Washington physician. He graduated from Amherst College and Yale Law School. He says nice things about the civil rights movement's traditional Jewish allies.
NEWS
By GREGORY P. KANE | September 10, 1993
"Where,'' Reginald Denny might be asking himself, ''is my invitation to join the NAACP?''If he is, it's a darned good question, one that NAACP executive director Ben Chavis might consider answering by extending the same invitation to Reginald Denny to join the NAACP that Chavis extended to Rodney King.Mr. Denny, for those of you who've just beamed in from a distant planet, is the unfortunate white truck driver who had the misfortune to be at the corner of Florence and Normandie avenues on April 29, 1992, the day the Los Angeles riots began.
NEWS
August 31, 1993
Woman, 32, carjacked in parking lotA Baltimore woman narrowly escaped injury in the parking lot of the Annapolis Plaza on Sunday when two men robbed her of her car and drove off as she held onto the key, county police said yesterday.The 32-year-old victim told police she was getting out of her car in the shopping center lot off Jennifer Road about 4:30 p.m. when two men walked up to her.She said she recognized one of them as someone she dated five years ago. That man began hitting the woman, grabbed her and pulled her out of the car, she said.
NEWS
By JAMES BOCK | July 31, 1994
America's newest civil rights leader wasn't born poor like Rep. Kweisi Mfume. He didn't march with Martin Luther King Jr. like the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson. He doesn't favor black separatism like Louis Farrakhan. And he never did time in prison like the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr.Hugh B. Price, the new president of the National Urban League, was born into prosperity as the son of a Washington physician. He graduated from Amherst College and Yale Law School. He says nice things about the civil rights movement's traditional Jewish allies.
NEWS
August 2, 2006
NAACP Youth Council is honored in D.C. Shamara Thornton; Zemen and Tubi Retta; Alexis Carter; Aurielle, Josh, Marcus and Matthew Austin; Dara and Keila Foster; and Cierra Holmes - all members of the Howard County NAACP Youth Council - attended the 97th NAACP National Convention July 15-20 in Washington. The Howard County NAACP Youth Council was named 1st Place NAACP Youth Council of the Year; the council's adviser, Bessie Bordenave, received the 1st Place NAACP Youth Advisor of the Year award.
NEWS
By Jack L. Levin | May 26, 1993
OH, what a time it was 30 years ago!That year, 1963, was a watershed, turbulent, earth-shaking year when the president was assassinated and the civil rights revolution roared to a climax. Some of us thought of it as a new beginning.I remember an uncannily prophetic sermon by my rabbi and friend, Morris Lieberman of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, on April 12. More than a year before passage of the civil rights bill and more than five years before America's cities erupted in the 1968 racial conflagration, Rabbi Lieberman spoke presciently to an audience not altogether sympathetic.
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