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NEWS
May 8, 2005
On February 23, 2005, EARL LOUIS WAGNER; beloved husband of Beatrice C. Wagner (nee Schwoerer); dear father of Jennifer Michelle Wagner and Douglas Earl Wagner; devoted brother of Louis P. Wagner Jr., Mildred Butt, Rita Noppinger and Roy Wagner. Also survived by nieces and nephews. A Committal Service will be held Wednesday, March 2 at 11:30 A.M. at the Chapel of Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery. A Memorial Mass will be offered Tuesday, May 10, at 7 P.M. at St. John's Church, Hydes, MD. Please omit flowers, contributions may be made to the Sisters of Charity, 333 S. Seton Avenue, Emmitsburg, MD 21727.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2012
One of the last surviving Wurlitzer organs in the country, which once entertained crowds at a posh Baltimore movie theater, will return to a downtown stage after a 42-year hiatus in the suburbs. The 85-year-old instrument will debut in its latest incarnation with a June 24 concert at the Engineers Club in Mount Vernon. Its audiences will be smaller than the 2,000 or so who flocked to the old State Theatre on Monument Street, but the organ has endured the test of time and a few moves.
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NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 29, 1995
The strains of "Bali Ha'i" floated over the hills of Catonsville.The tall windows stood wide open in an old auditorium on the grounds of Spring Grove Hospital Center. The music drifted out: "Hernando's Hideaway," "The Moon of Manakoora" and a stirring version of "Maryland, My Maryland."The strains were coming from 500 wood and lead-compound pipes of a long-silenced organ, a classic 1922 theater model that once accompanied the films of Gloria Swanson and C. B. DeMille the now-demolished Metropolitan Theater at North and Pennsylvania avenues.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
A grand Wurlitzer organ, salvaged from a Baltimore movie theater and ensconced in a suburban home since the 1960s, will soon play to audiences at another city institution. After Roy Wagner announced that he wanted to give away the prized possession that he's kept in his Glen Arm basement, several groups offered to take it off his hands. The Baltimore Engineering Society came up with the best option for the Wurlitzer's future, he said. A contractor will soon dismantle the 2.5-ton instrument and put it together again at the Engineers Club in Mount Vernon, a popular venue for galas, receptions, operettas and, maybe soon, silent movies with organ notes trilling in the background.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
A grand Wurlitzer organ, salvaged from a Baltimore movie theater and ensconced in a suburban home since the 1960s, will soon play to audiences at another city institution. After Roy Wagner announced that he wanted to give away the prized possession that he's kept in his Glen Arm basement, several groups offered to take it off his hands. The Baltimore Engineering Society came up with the best option for the Wurlitzer's future, he said. A contractor will soon dismantle the 2.5-ton instrument and put it together again at the Engineers Club in Mount Vernon, a popular venue for galas, receptions, operettas and, maybe soon, silent movies with organ notes trilling in the background.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2011
Roy Wagner's musical treasure requires considerable space, with its 500-some pipes, its floor-to-ceiling relay panel filled with thousands of tiny pneumatic devices and a cumbersome blower with huge, noisy fans and belts. The instrument's elegant console, white and trimmed in gold leaf, dominates any room. And the sound that emanates when a musician tackles its double keyboard, numerous controls and floor pedals is equally grand. Believed to be the last remaining theater organ from a Baltimore movie house, the 1927 Wurlitzer has captured Wagner's fancy since the 1960s, when he used to borrow a key to the old State Theatre on Monument Street to play the shuttered playhouse's 2.5-ton wonder.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2012
One of the last surviving Wurlitzer organs in the country, which once entertained crowds at a posh Baltimore movie theater, will return to a downtown stage after a 42-year hiatus in the suburbs. The 85-year-old instrument will debut in its latest incarnation with a June 24 concert at the Engineers Club in Mount Vernon. Its audiences will be smaller than the 2,000 or so who flocked to the old State Theatre on Monument Street, but the organ has endured the test of time and a few moves.
NEWS
May 14, 2003
On May 11, 2003, WINIFRED ELIZABETH DAVIS (nee Williams) beloved wife of the late Henry W. Davis; devoted mother of Bruce C. Davis, Sharon Davis Gratto and Brian H. Davis; loving grandmother of Karen Ledebur, Craig Davis and Eugenia Gratto; dear great-grandmother of Allison Davis, and Luke and Chase Ledebur; loving sister of Conrad Williams of Belle Fourche, SD. A Funeral Service will be held Friday1 P.M., at Grace United Methodist Church (Charles St...
NEWS
By Seth Rosen and Seth Rosen,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2004
In one corner of the cottage, 76-year-old Lee DuBois is lying flat on his back underneath a massive wooden "wind chest," cleaning the dirt from a small pipe. Across the room, Sven Larsen, 87, inspects a tangled web of electrical wires from behind his thick, black-rimmed glasses. Every Tuesday, both men, along with at least 10 other members of the Free State Theatre Organ Society, work diligently to restore and reassemble a 1927 Wurlitzer theater organ. Their makeshift workshop, on the campus of Spring Grove Hospital Center in Catonsville, is lined with rows of 6-foot-high stacks of wooden and metal pipes, and has a lingering scent of recently cut plywood.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2005
Richard Odell Haffer, a theater pipe organ expert and retired CSX railroad manager, died of heart failure Friday at his Severna Park home. He was 70. Mr. Haffer was born in Baltimore, raised in the Morrell Park neighborhood and graduated in 1954 from Polytechnic Institute. "As a teenager, he worked as an usher at the old Century Theatre and came to love the sound of the great theater organ that played there daily," said Ray Davidson, a longtime friend. "He was later promoted to head usher, where one of his duties included raising the lift for the organ for the legendary Baltimore theater organist Harvey Hammond."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2011
Roy Wagner's musical treasure requires considerable space, with its 500-some pipes, its floor-to-ceiling relay panel filled with thousands of tiny pneumatic devices and a cumbersome blower with huge, noisy fans and belts. The instrument's elegant console, white and trimmed in gold leaf, dominates any room. And the sound that emanates when a musician tackles its double keyboard, numerous controls and floor pedals is equally grand. Believed to be the last remaining theater organ from a Baltimore movie house, the 1927 Wurlitzer has captured Wagner's fancy since the 1960s, when he used to borrow a key to the old State Theatre on Monument Street to play the shuttered playhouse's 2.5-ton wonder.
NEWS
May 8, 2005
On February 23, 2005, EARL LOUIS WAGNER; beloved husband of Beatrice C. Wagner (nee Schwoerer); dear father of Jennifer Michelle Wagner and Douglas Earl Wagner; devoted brother of Louis P. Wagner Jr., Mildred Butt, Rita Noppinger and Roy Wagner. Also survived by nieces and nephews. A Committal Service will be held Wednesday, March 2 at 11:30 A.M. at the Chapel of Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery. A Memorial Mass will be offered Tuesday, May 10, at 7 P.M. at St. John's Church, Hydes, MD. Please omit flowers, contributions may be made to the Sisters of Charity, 333 S. Seton Avenue, Emmitsburg, MD 21727.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 29, 1995
The strains of "Bali Ha'i" floated over the hills of Catonsville.The tall windows stood wide open in an old auditorium on the grounds of Spring Grove Hospital Center. The music drifted out: "Hernando's Hideaway," "The Moon of Manakoora" and a stirring version of "Maryland, My Maryland."The strains were coming from 500 wood and lead-compound pipes of a long-silenced organ, a classic 1922 theater model that once accompanied the films of Gloria Swanson and C. B. DeMille the now-demolished Metropolitan Theater at North and Pennsylvania avenues.
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