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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 20, 1995
PHILADELPHIA -- Some people expect him to bark or bite. Others shy away.Jonathan Hadary has never experienced anything like this before. But he takes it as a compliment. After all, the actor is playing Roy Cohn.Sen. Joseph McCarthy's right-hand man during the Communist witch hunts of the 1950s, Cohn is the character Hadary describes as "the devil" in "Angels in America."An imaginative and inspiring two-part, seven-hour epic by Tony Kushner, "Angels" interweaves the stories of two couples: one homosexual and the other Mormon (and ostensibly straight)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Marston and David Marston,Special to the Sun | May 9, 2004
Puppetmaster: The Secret Life of J. Edgar Hoover, by Richard Hack. New Millennium. 455 pages. $27.50. Truman Capote exposes J. Edgar Hoover! Who would not buy that book? In 1980, Capote -- who called Hoover and Hoover's constant companion Clyde Tolson "Johnny and Clyde" -- started interviews for his expose, apparently unconcerned about the 200-page secret chronicle of his own sybaritic lifestyle at FBI headquarters. Unfortunately, Capote got diverted and eventually passed his notes along to investigative reporter / biographer Richard Hack.
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NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | December 15, 1993
Chicago.--One of the most moving moments I have ever experienced in the theater occurs in the second half of Tony Kushner's ''Angels in America,'' which opened recently on Broadway. When the first part of this 7 1/2-hour-long play came to Broadway in the spring, many people (I among them) wondered how Mr. Kushner could ever top his spectacular opening moves. There were so many disparate themes and people to be woven together that he seemed to have assigned himself a project impossible.But he has done it. Part 2 (''Perestroika'')
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff | April 25, 2004
WASHINGTON -- When veteran newswoman Mary McGrory is buried this week, she will leave a legacy of words -- columns known for their searing insight, whimsical prose and unshakable convictions. McGrory, who died Wednesday at age 85, loved being wherever history was happening. At The Washington Star, she wrote Washington as theater. She won a Pulitzer Prize for commentary in 1974 for her coverage of Watergate. In 1981, she moved on to The Washington Post, where her syndicated columns were never timid in their liberal outlook or curiosity about the world.
NEWS
June 21, 1996
Gerard David Schine,68, an aide to U.S. Sen. Joseph McCarthy during the senator's hunt for Communists in the 1950s, was killed Wednesday with his wife and son when their small plane crashed on a highway after takeoff from Burbank, Calif.Mr. Schine was 26, Harvard-educated and heir to a hotel fortune when he began working for Mr. McCarthy in 1953. He and the senator's aide, Roy Cohn, went hunting for subversives in the U.S. Information Agency in Europe.Mr. Schine was drafted into the Army that winter.
NEWS
By William Safire | June 30, 1992
MUCH more is to be learned about the secret political-media power connections of Ross Perot.1. The Rockefeller Connection. On Feb. 2, 1973, New York state's welfare department chose three data-processing companies to bid on a contract; because Ross Perot's company had a poor record in other states, it was not selected to be a bidder.To the amazement of professionals in the field, the state welfare commissioner was summoned to the office of Gov. Nelson Rockefeller to explain to Mr. Perot, who was sitting there, why his firm was not on the list.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | May 9, 1995
Like America itself, Tony Kushner's magnificently original "Angels in America" is made up of all sorts of combinations: gays and straights, Jews and Mormons, liberals and Reagan Republicans, mortals and angels.And, as in life, the representatives of these contingents often are not what they seem.Nor does the epic "Angels in America" -- the first 3 1/2 -hour, Pulitzer Prize-winning part of which, "Millennium Approaches," is now at Washington's Kennedy Center -- seem like any other Broadway play.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Marston and David Marston,Special to the Sun | May 9, 2004
Puppetmaster: The Secret Life of J. Edgar Hoover, by Richard Hack. New Millennium. 455 pages. $27.50. Truman Capote exposes J. Edgar Hoover! Who would not buy that book? In 1980, Capote -- who called Hoover and Hoover's constant companion Clyde Tolson "Johnny and Clyde" -- started interviews for his expose, apparently unconcerned about the 200-page secret chronicle of his own sybaritic lifestyle at FBI headquarters. Unfortunately, Capote got diverted and eventually passed his notes along to investigative reporter / biographer Richard Hack.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff | April 25, 2004
WASHINGTON -- When veteran newswoman Mary McGrory is buried this week, she will leave a legacy of words -- columns known for their searing insight, whimsical prose and unshakable convictions. McGrory, who died Wednesday at age 85, loved being wherever history was happening. At The Washington Star, she wrote Washington as theater. She won a Pulitzer Prize for commentary in 1974 for her coverage of Watergate. In 1981, she moved on to The Washington Post, where her syndicated columns were never timid in their liberal outlook or curiosity about the world.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 1, 1998
"Point of Order" is an absorbing, often funny series of highlights from the 1954 hearings that pitted Sen. Joseph McCarthy against the U.S. Army. The Army accused McCarthy and his lawyer, Roy Cohn, of trying to muscle top brass into giving preferential treatment to another McCarthy associate, David Schine; McCarthy counter-charged that the Army was just trying to pre-empt his investigation of the Defense Department for Communists.Culled from 188 hours of their televised broadcast, "Point of Order" is an idiosyncratic, almost abstract portrait of a demagogue brought down by the very process he had been exploiting for years.
NEWS
June 21, 1996
Gerard David Schine,68, an aide to U.S. Sen. Joseph McCarthy during the senator's hunt for Communists in the 1950s, was killed Wednesday with his wife and son when their small plane crashed on a highway after takeoff from Burbank, Calif.Mr. Schine was 26, Harvard-educated and heir to a hotel fortune when he began working for Mr. McCarthy in 1953. He and the senator's aide, Roy Cohn, went hunting for subversives in the U.S. Information Agency in Europe.Mr. Schine was drafted into the Army that winter.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 20, 1995
PHILADELPHIA -- Some people expect him to bark or bite. Others shy away.Jonathan Hadary has never experienced anything like this before. But he takes it as a compliment. After all, the actor is playing Roy Cohn.Sen. Joseph McCarthy's right-hand man during the Communist witch hunts of the 1950s, Cohn is the character Hadary describes as "the devil" in "Angels in America."An imaginative and inspiring two-part, seven-hour epic by Tony Kushner, "Angels" interweaves the stories of two couples: one homosexual and the other Mormon (and ostensibly straight)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | May 9, 1995
Like America itself, Tony Kushner's magnificently original "Angels in America" is made up of all sorts of combinations: gays and straights, Jews and Mormons, liberals and Reagan Republicans, mortals and angels.And, as in life, the representatives of these contingents often are not what they seem.Nor does the epic "Angels in America" -- the first 3 1/2 -hour, Pulitzer Prize-winning part of which, "Millennium Approaches," is now at Washington's Kennedy Center -- seem like any other Broadway play.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | December 15, 1993
Chicago.--One of the most moving moments I have ever experienced in the theater occurs in the second half of Tony Kushner's ''Angels in America,'' which opened recently on Broadway. When the first part of this 7 1/2-hour-long play came to Broadway in the spring, many people (I among them) wondered how Mr. Kushner could ever top his spectacular opening moves. There were so many disparate themes and people to be woven together that he seemed to have assigned himself a project impossible.But he has done it. Part 2 (''Perestroika'')
NEWS
By William Safire | June 30, 1992
MUCH more is to be learned about the secret political-media power connections of Ross Perot.1. The Rockefeller Connection. On Feb. 2, 1973, New York state's welfare department chose three data-processing companies to bid on a contract; because Ross Perot's company had a poor record in other states, it was not selected to be a bidder.To the amazement of professionals in the field, the state welfare commissioner was summoned to the office of Gov. Nelson Rockefeller to explain to Mr. Perot, who was sitting there, why his firm was not on the list.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 10, 1998
In a community-theater effort of impressive daring, AXIS Theatre is producing Tony Kushner's award-winning "Angels in America." A few reasons the production is so daring: One, its themes range from AIDS and politics to Mormonism; two, it's a two-part epic that runs a total of seven hours; and three, its eclectic cast of characters includes a Mormon couple, a homosexual couple (one of whom has AIDS), Red-baiting attorney Roy Cohn and, of course, angels.None of these challenges, however, are deterring this valiant little theater, where Part 1, "Millennium Approaches," opens tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
What a great weekend: HBO sent a screener for "Phil Spector," a made-for-TV movie about the legendary music producer, starring Al Pacino and Helen Mirren. Barry Levinson is the executive producer, with David Mamet as writer and director. That enough talent for you? David Mamet, whose "Glengarry Glen Ross" is made of the same fine angry American genius as Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman," and he's writing and directing a Sunday-night made-for-television movie on HBO. Talk to me some more about how TV dumbs down the culture.
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