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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2004
After Patricia and Roy Chapman bought their farm, they struggled trying to decide what to name it. They talked about the things they wanted to do on their 100 acres in New London, Pa. Someday they wanted to do this, and someday they wanted to do that. Finally, as the list of "someday projects" grew, they decided upon a name: Someday Farm. Someday has come to this. On Saturday, their 3-year-old Smarty Jones, winner of the Kentucky Derby and a $5 million bonus from Oaklawn Park, will attempt to win the Preakness at Pimlico Race Course.
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By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2004
A few months ago, Roy Chapman was a semi-obscure, semi-retired septuagenarian who owned a semi-promising racehorse named Smarty Jones. Now, Chapman - not to mention his horse - is on the brink of making history. If Smarty Jones can finish off his amazing run that began two weeks ago at Churchill Downs and continued yesterday at Pimlico Race Course with a Triple Crown-clinching victory next month at Belmont Park, he and his wife, Patricia, would become the richest owners in the sport's history.
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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2004
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - Bob Camac, a respected trainer on the Mid-Atlantic circuit, was responsible for the breeding that produced Smarty Jones. Camac's life came to a tragic end before he saw the fruits of that mating. Camac lived in New Jersey, raced throughout the Mid-Atlantic and trained horses for, among others, Patricia and Roy Chapman. The Chapmans are retired and divide their time between homes near Sarasota, Fla., and in New Hope, Pa. Upon Camac's recommendation, they bought the filly I'll Get Along for $40,000 at the 1993 Keeneland September yearling auction.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2004
After Patricia and Roy Chapman bought their farm, they struggled trying to decide what to name it. They talked about the things they wanted to do on their 100 acres in New London, Pa. Someday they wanted to do this, and someday they wanted to do that. Finally, as the list of "someday projects" grew, they decided upon a name: Someday Farm. Someday has come to this. On Saturday, their 3-year-old Smarty Jones, winner of the Kentucky Derby and a $5 million bonus from Oaklawn Park, will attempt to win the Preakness at Pimlico Race Course.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2004
A few months ago, Roy Chapman was a semi-obscure, semi-retired septuagenarian who owned a semi-promising racehorse named Smarty Jones. Now, Chapman - not to mention his horse - is on the brink of making history. If Smarty Jones can finish off his amazing run that began two weeks ago at Churchill Downs and continued yesterday at Pimlico Race Course with a Triple Crown-clinching victory next month at Belmont Park, he and his wife, Patricia, would become the richest owners in the sport's history.
NEWS
February 7, 2005
Eunice Best, who worked in child care as a nanny, died of congestive heart failure Jan. 31 at North Arundel Hospital. The Annapolis resident was 78. Born Eunice Mosella Chapman in Jefferson County, W.Va., she was a 1946 graduate of Berryville High School in Virginia. She lived in Southeast Baltimore in the late 1940s and was a practical nurse at the old Baltimore City Hospitals before becoming a nanny and working in child care in Washington's Capitol Hill area for six families over 35 years.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | April 3, 1992
Uncle Merlin, who fell while racing on the lead in the 1990 English Grand National at Liverpool, returns to timber racing tomorrow at the Elkridge-Harford Point-to-Point in Monkton.The 11-year-old gelding, who won the Maryland Hunt Cup in 1989, faces unbeaten Revelstoke in the Edward S. Voss Memorial over the three-mile timber course at Atlanta Hall Farm."Uncle Merlin last raced in England in December 1990, when he injured a tendon," said rider-trainer Louis "Paddy" Neilson III. "His owners [Mr. and Mrs. Roy Chapman of Unionville, Pa.]
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1996
Prime-time may not look like much today, but if you're into old bones, there's some interesting dinosaur stuff on TBS this morning."Second Noah" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Borrowing a page (and a plot) from "Babe," Hannah (Ashley Gorrell) tries turning Homer the pig into a trained dog. ABC."Dark Skies" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Some interesting developments for Kimberly (Megan Ward): she meets astronaut who was abducted by aliens at the same time she was, and she relives that abduction thanks to the wonders of hypnosis.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2005
The Maryland Hunt Cup is always the centerpiece of the local steeplechase season, and the 2005 edition promises to be even more festive this weekend. A gala weekend is planned, starting at 6:30 p.m. tomorrow at Shawan Downs with a program called "Americans at Aintree" that will showcase, respectively, the 40th and 25th anniversaries of victories by American horses Jay Trump and Ben Nevis in the English Grand National, the world's most famous steeplechase. The event will benefit the land preservation trust of Shawan Downs, the picturesque 300-acre equestrian event center in Hunt Valley.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2004
The focus shifts from horse to horse before the Kentucky Derby. Before the Preakness, it locks onto one. The Derby winner arrives at Pimlico Race Course a celebrity. His task is clear: Win the Preakness, the second leg of the Triple Crown, so he can move ahead to Belmont Park with a chance for immortality. Five times in the past seven years, the Derby winner has stormed into Baltimore and snared the Preakness, only to lose the Belmont three weeks later. And racing is deprived of another Triple Crown winner.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2004
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - Bob Camac, a respected trainer on the Mid-Atlantic circuit, was responsible for the breeding that produced Smarty Jones. Camac's life came to a tragic end before he saw the fruits of that mating. Camac lived in New Jersey, raced throughout the Mid-Atlantic and trained horses for, among others, Patricia and Roy Chapman. The Chapmans are retired and divide their time between homes near Sarasota, Fla., and in New Hope, Pa. Upon Camac's recommendation, they bought the filly I'll Get Along for $40,000 at the 1993 Keeneland September yearling auction.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2004
The Preakness could showcase the top three finishers in the Kentucky Derby, as well as the Derby's morning-line favorite. Kristin Mulhall, trainer of Imperialism, a closing third in the Derby, said the 16-race veteran will likely run in the Preakness after returning to the track at Hollywood Park and training aggressively. Imperialism would join Derby winner Smarty Jones, Derby runner-up Lion Heart and the Derby's morning-line favorite, The Cliff's Edge, who finished fifth after losing both of his front shoes, in the Preakness starting gate.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | April 18, 1993
Walter Zile has been bowling for "30 years or more." Born and raised in Carroll County, he lives in Westminster and bowls tenpins in two leagues -- Monday Seniors and Friday mornings at Westminster Thunderhead Lanes.Throwing a 15-pound ball, he averages 136, and his high series is 491."Almost had that 500 set," Zile said, "Just missed it by those few pins."It's not for lack of trying. He also bowls occasionally in the Colorama event at Hampstead Bowling Center on Thursday mornings."He's one of the original eight members of the Monday Seniors," said Henry Wheeler, secretary of the league.
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