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Roy Campanella

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NEWS
June 30, 1993
To play in the big leagues, you got to be a man, but you got to have a lot of little boy in you, too.-- Roy CampanellaHe was a winner, on the field and off. Not only did Roy Campanella wind up in baseball's Hall of Fame for his prowess on the ball diamond, he turned himself into an All Star off the field as the courageous example of what it takes to enjoy life after suffering a crippling injury.All his life, he encountered setbacks, but they never got him down. Racial segregation kept him from the major leagues until he was 26, yet he made the most of the opportunity when it arrived.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2009
How to Love Gordon Livingston, M.D. (DaCapo Press, 240 pages, $19.95) For Gordon Livingston, M.D., a Maryland psychiatrist and marriage counselor, empathy isn't just the secret of a happy marriage; it's also the secret of happiness. In his fourth book, he explains how we learn to love ourselves by loving others and becoming less self-absorbed. If you cultivate in yourself the characteristics you value in others, he says, you will find material success, enlightenment and marital happiness.
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NEWS
June 29, 1993
Because of racism, his major league career didn't begin until he was 26. It ended prematurely 10 years later in a car crash. He spent the final 35 years of his life as a quadriplegic.For most men, these setbacks might have produced bitterness. But in Roy Campanella, it produced a role model extraordinaire. He helped shatter baseball's racial barrier. He was the preeminent catcher of his day. And after tragedy struck, he became a spokesman for the handicapped.On the ball field, he won Most Valuable Player three times; set a single-season record (for a catcher)
SPORTS
April 15, 2007
During the 1947 baseball season, Jackie Robinson maintained complete composure in service of the greater good. Along with boxer Joe Louis, Robinson helped lay the integrationist groundwork for the civil rights movement that would follow in the 1950s. And for that, he's the only major league baseball player honored with a retired number by every franchise. In the rush to celebrate Robinson the social iconic figure, some forget the greatness of Robinson the player. He was already 28 when he reached the majors, so his career totals don't pop the eyes.
NEWS
July 6, 1993
Competition encourages good gradesThe recent discussion about grading Baltimore County students took me back to my early years in a Canadian school.The monthly report was based on tests on which the student was given a numerical rating. The report listed all the subjects alongside two columns headed "Marks won by bearer" and "Highest marks taken." This allowed comparison with other students in each subject.The marks won by bearer were totaled and filled in below. The student receiving the highest total was given Rank 1; the next highest received Rank 2. If there was a tie, both students received the same rank.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2009
How to Love Gordon Livingston, M.D. (DaCapo Press, 240 pages, $19.95) For Gordon Livingston, M.D., a Maryland psychiatrist and marriage counselor, empathy isn't just the secret of a happy marriage; it's also the secret of happiness. In his fourth book, he explains how we learn to love ourselves by loving others and becoming less self-absorbed. If you cultivate in yourself the characteristics you value in others, he says, you will find material success, enlightenment and marital happiness.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | April 5, 1999
IT IS time, as the last baseball season of the 1900s begins, to put together the Baltimore team of the century. That is, a lineup of the best players to have pitched, batted and fielded in this city's behalf.Such a project could be carried out in committee of the whole (48,876 seating capacity) ballpark, or by any one centenarian. The ensuing argument could carry us into the 2000s.Rules: to be eligible, a nominee must have played at least one full, pennant-standings inning for a Baltimore team in the American, Federal, Negro or International leagues, in the 1900s (sorry, Judy Johnson, Jimmie Foxx, Al Kaline)
NEWS
By M. William Salganik | January 16, 1995
ORIOLES MEMORIES 1969-1994. By Rex Barney and Norman Macht. Goodwood Press. 263 pages. $19.95.EVEN THOUGH he turned 70 last month, and even though there might not be a baseball season this year, Rex Barney is a better bet for the Cy Young Award than for the Nobel Prize in Literature.But Mr. Barney, who last pitched in the major leagues in 1950 (33 2/3 innings, 23 strikeouts, 48 walks), isn't throwing professionally these days. He's writing. Sort of."Rex Barney's Orioles Memories" hardly seems like a book.
FEATURES
By Mike Littwin | October 3, 1996
YOU THINK you're excited. You think you're going crazy. You think you won't sleep till tomorrow and Game 3 and Mike Mussina pitching for what would be a sweep of the mighty Cleveland Indians.You think this is all you.You're not even close.Come to the Orioles clubhouse. Come to the place the pros hang out. Come to where they take one game at a time, where they can't afford to get too excited, where they have to stay focused, where they get paid millions of dollars and all they care about is keeping up their BMW payments.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | August 3, 1992
NOTEworthy Day: All signs point to the Orioles being in the divisional hunt all the way and record crowds taking the final home attendance to more than 3.5 million. When will the euphoria surrounding the new park subside? Chuck McGeehan, correspondent for Sports Ticker, says, "five minutes after next year's All-Star Game is over." He's probably right.* Another important responsibility has been placed in the capable hands of Gene Corrigan, the Atlantic Coast Conference commissioner, via his appointment as chairman of the honors court that makes selections to the College Football Hall of Fame . . . At last count, 12 corporate entertainment tents, with catering by Leonard Schleider and his Cameo organization, will be erected on the Memorial Stadium parking lot for the exhibition between the Miami Dolphins and the New Orleans Saints . . . Incidentally, publisher Ted Venetoulis of the Oriole Gazette will be out with a football version, the Colt Gazette, for the game Aug. 27, edited by Robbie Wallace, former "quarterback" of the Belair Aegis.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | April 5, 1999
IT IS time, as the last baseball season of the 1900s begins, to put together the Baltimore team of the century. That is, a lineup of the best players to have pitched, batted and fielded in this city's behalf.Such a project could be carried out in committee of the whole (48,876 seating capacity) ballpark, or by any one centenarian. The ensuing argument could carry us into the 2000s.Rules: to be eligible, a nominee must have played at least one full, pennant-standings inning for a Baltimore team in the American, Federal, Negro or International leagues, in the 1900s (sorry, Judy Johnson, Jimmie Foxx, Al Kaline)
FEATURES
By Mike Littwin | October 3, 1996
YOU THINK you're excited. You think you're going crazy. You think you won't sleep till tomorrow and Game 3 and Mike Mussina pitching for what would be a sweep of the mighty Cleveland Indians.You think this is all you.You're not even close.Come to the Orioles clubhouse. Come to the place the pros hang out. Come to where they take one game at a time, where they can't afford to get too excited, where they have to stay focused, where they get paid millions of dollars and all they care about is keeping up their BMW payments.
NEWS
By M. William Salganik | January 16, 1995
ORIOLES MEMORIES 1969-1994. By Rex Barney and Norman Macht. Goodwood Press. 263 pages. $19.95.EVEN THOUGH he turned 70 last month, and even though there might not be a baseball season this year, Rex Barney is a better bet for the Cy Young Award than for the Nobel Prize in Literature.But Mr. Barney, who last pitched in the major leagues in 1950 (33 2/3 innings, 23 strikeouts, 48 walks), isn't throwing professionally these days. He's writing. Sort of."Rex Barney's Orioles Memories" hardly seems like a book.
NEWS
July 6, 1993
Competition encourages good gradesThe recent discussion about grading Baltimore County students took me back to my early years in a Canadian school.The monthly report was based on tests on which the student was given a numerical rating. The report listed all the subjects alongside two columns headed "Marks won by bearer" and "Highest marks taken." This allowed comparison with other students in each subject.The marks won by bearer were totaled and filled in below. The student receiving the highest total was given Rank 1; the next highest received Rank 2. If there was a tie, both students received the same rank.
NEWS
June 30, 1993
To play in the big leagues, you got to be a man, but you got to have a lot of little boy in you, too.-- Roy CampanellaHe was a winner, on the field and off. Not only did Roy Campanella wind up in baseball's Hall of Fame for his prowess on the ball diamond, he turned himself into an All Star off the field as the courageous example of what it takes to enjoy life after suffering a crippling injury.All his life, he encountered setbacks, but they never got him down. Racial segregation kept him from the major leagues until he was 26, yet he made the most of the opportunity when it arrived.
NEWS
June 29, 1993
Because of racism, his major league career didn't begin until he was 26. It ended prematurely 10 years later in a car crash. He spent the final 35 years of his life as a quadriplegic.For most men, these setbacks might have produced bitterness. But in Roy Campanella, it produced a role model extraordinaire. He helped shatter baseball's racial barrier. He was the preeminent catcher of his day. And after tragedy struck, he became a spokesman for the handicapped.On the ball field, he won Most Valuable Player three times; set a single-season record (for a catcher)
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Evening Sun Staff | September 23, 1991
CLEVELAND -- Could Eric Bell be one of those who got away from the Orioles?The lefthander pitched the final four innings of Cleveland's 2-1 win yesterday, shutting out his former teammates on one hit. Bell (2-0) has allowed only two hits in 9 1/3 innings since being promoted from Triple A Canton-Akron. He had gone four years between victories in the big leagues.Elbow surgery followed by a slow recovery influenced the Orioles to leave Bell off their major-league roster last winter. He ultimately signed with the Indians as a six-year minor-league free agent.
SPORTS
April 15, 2007
During the 1947 baseball season, Jackie Robinson maintained complete composure in service of the greater good. Along with boxer Joe Louis, Robinson helped lay the integrationist groundwork for the civil rights movement that would follow in the 1950s. And for that, he's the only major league baseball player honored with a retired number by every franchise. In the rush to celebrate Robinson the social iconic figure, some forget the greatness of Robinson the player. He was already 28 when he reached the majors, so his career totals don't pop the eyes.
SPORTS
By Stan Hochman and Stan Hochman,Philadelphia Daily News | June 29, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- Maybe Roy Campanella once said, "You gotta be a man to play baseball for a living, but you gotta have a lot of little boy in you, too."Maybe he didn't.You never know. New York had seven newspapers in the '50s. Seven beat writers scrambling for something fresh, seven columnists hovering around the batting cage, eavesdropping, lusting after the hard angle, willing to bend a phrase here, a quote there.Roger Kahn, in his splendid book, "The Boys of Summer," has Campanella chirping during a World Series, "There's nothing a boy likes better than a circus, and to play this game good, a lot of you's got to be a little boy."
SPORTS
By John Steadman | August 3, 1992
NOTEworthy Day: All signs point to the Orioles being in the divisional hunt all the way and record crowds taking the final home attendance to more than 3.5 million. When will the euphoria surrounding the new park subside? Chuck McGeehan, correspondent for Sports Ticker, says, "five minutes after next year's All-Star Game is over." He's probably right.* Another important responsibility has been placed in the capable hands of Gene Corrigan, the Atlantic Coast Conference commissioner, via his appointment as chairman of the honors court that makes selections to the College Football Hall of Fame . . . At last count, 12 corporate entertainment tents, with catering by Leonard Schleider and his Cameo organization, will be erected on the Memorial Stadium parking lot for the exhibition between the Miami Dolphins and the New Orleans Saints . . . Incidentally, publisher Ted Venetoulis of the Oriole Gazette will be out with a football version, the Colt Gazette, for the game Aug. 27, edited by Robbie Wallace, former "quarterback" of the Belair Aegis.
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