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By MICHAEL SRAGOW | December 18, 2005
CHICAGO: THE RAZZLE-DAZZLE EDITION / / Miramax Home Entertainment / / $29.99 Three years after its Best Picture Oscar, Chicago remains the zingiest movie of its kind since Cabaret (1972). The DVD premiere of The Razzle-Dazzle Edition puts director-choreographer Rob Marshall's great success on the home-video front line before the national rollout of Marshall's Memoirs of a Geisha. Not even legendary filmmaker William A. Wellman, in Roxie Hart (1942), showed as much panache as Marshall in mounting the lowdown-classic story of a Roaring '20s chorine who uses her notoriety as a killer to fuel showbiz celebrity.
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By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2011
Toby's Dinner Theatre of Columbia brings its jazzy, dazzling production of the musical "Chicago" to its intimate, in-the-round venue. All seats at Toby's are close to the action, which lends immediacy to this Broadway classic. The tale, well told in Toby's production, centers on 1920s-era chorus girl Roxie Hart, who shoots her lover and persuades her husband, Amos, to assume blame for the act until he discovers this "burglar" is no stranger but a frequent and familiar visitor. This inspires Amos to let Roxie go to jail.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 27, 2002
Chicago is the zingiest, most inventive movie of its kind since Cabaret. It leaves viewers feeling juiced-up, smart, alive - clamoring for a new era of big-screen musicals with sass and sensibility. Director-choreographer Rob Marshall and screenwriter Bill Condon embrace the effrontery of the lowdown-classic story. Once again, a Roaring '20s chorine named Roxie Hart (Renee Zellweger) and a headliner named Velma Kelley (Catherine Zeta-Jones) use their notoriety as killers to fuel show-biz celebrity.
EXPLORE
By Carolyn Kelemen | September 21, 2011
Ever since it opened on Broadway in 1975, "Chicago, the Musical" has brought the Windy City's scandalous ways to a new generation of theater-goers. Now through early November, we can do a little more time on the women's block of the Cook County jail with the likes of Roxie Hart, Velma Kelly and other jazz-era murderesses doing the "Cell Block Tango" right here at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Columbia. Forget for a moment the immorality of murder or whether you buy the ladies' excuses that their unfaithful hubbies and boyfriends "had it coming.
EXPLORE
By Carolyn Kelemen | September 21, 2011
Ever since it opened on Broadway in 1975, "Chicago, the Musical" has brought the Windy City's scandalous ways to a new generation of theater-goers. Now through early November, we can do a little more time on the women's block of the Cook County jail with the likes of Roxie Hart, Velma Kelly and other jazz-era murderesses doing the "Cell Block Tango" right here at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Columbia. Forget for a moment the immorality of murder or whether you buy the ladies' excuses that their unfaithful hubbies and boyfriends "had it coming.
NEWS
By JOE DZIEMIANOWICZ and JOE DZIEMIANOWICZ,NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | February 19, 2006
Many men have razzle-dazzled us with smooth dance moves: Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly and John Travolta immediately spring to mind. But John O'Hurley, now starring as sexy lawyer Billy Flynn in Chicago, deserves special props for executing the fanciest footwork in recent history. The 51-year-old actor has managed to foxtrot, tango and waltz his way from being a stooge to a stud. That's no mean feat - especially when you've been pigeonholed as a completely different kind of show-biz being for a decade.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 30, 2003
Hello, suckers. Welcome back," the character of Velma Kelly says to the audience after intermission in the musical Chicago. So what does that make us? Not suckers. Granted, this is the third time Baltimore has welcomed a touring production of the stylish and steamy Tony Award-winning Broadway revival. But the top-notch company playing the Lyric Opera House through Sunday is very welcome indeed. For theatergoers who have seen the recent Academy Award-winning movie, taking the show in this time around will be a different experience.
EXPLORE
By Anthony Sclafani | June 2, 2011
You can't beat Bob Fosse. The dance moves created by the late, legendary Broadway choreographer are so definitive that their interpretations by local choreographer Lori Struss are reason enough to see "Chicago," now being revived by Columbia's Silhouette Stages. The production, which runs at Slayton House until the end of the weekend, has more to offer than spiffy dance moves, however. There's also some fine acting, powerful singing and a story that's, well, pretty strange, but nonetheless interesting and very provocative.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2011
Toby's Dinner Theatre of Columbia brings its jazzy, dazzling production of the musical "Chicago" to its intimate, in-the-round venue. All seats at Toby's are close to the action, which lends immediacy to this Broadway classic. The tale, well told in Toby's production, centers on 1920s-era chorus girl Roxie Hart, who shoots her lover and persuades her husband, Amos, to assume blame for the act until he discovers this "burglar" is no stranger but a frequent and familiar visitor. This inspires Amos to let Roxie go to jail.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2011
Annapolis Summer Garden's season opener, "Chicago," gets just about everything so right that it would please the ghost of choreographer Bob Fosse, to whose memory debuting director and choreographer Taavon Gamble dedicates this production. The production's success is largely attributable to Gamble's smart sense of style, evident in the stark black background set and simple black costumes that enhance his dynamic choreography. Also evident in every scene is the meticulous care Gamble gives all aspects of this Kander and Ebb musical that reveals the corruption of 1920s Chicago's criminal justice system through its heroines, who are based on actual women reported on in Chicago newspapers.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2011
Annapolis Summer Garden's season opener, "Chicago," gets just about everything so right that it would please the ghost of choreographer Bob Fosse, to whose memory debuting director and choreographer Taavon Gamble dedicates this production. The production's success is largely attributable to Gamble's smart sense of style, evident in the stark black background set and simple black costumes that enhance his dynamic choreography. Also evident in every scene is the meticulous care Gamble gives all aspects of this Kander and Ebb musical that reveals the corruption of 1920s Chicago's criminal justice system through its heroines, who are based on actual women reported on in Chicago newspapers.
EXPLORE
By Anthony Sclafani | June 2, 2011
You can't beat Bob Fosse. The dance moves created by the late, legendary Broadway choreographer are so definitive that their interpretations by local choreographer Lori Struss are reason enough to see "Chicago," now being revived by Columbia's Silhouette Stages. The production, which runs at Slayton House until the end of the weekend, has more to offer than spiffy dance moves, however. There's also some fine acting, powerful singing and a story that's, well, pretty strange, but nonetheless interesting and very provocative.
EXPLORE
May 26, 2011
It's a little-known fact now, but when the musical "Chicago" made its Broadway debut in 1975, it wasn't much of a hit, running less than a thousand performances. It only became a smash musical and movie when it was revived decades later. That's because it was way ahead of its time, said Conni Ross, who is co-directing a revival of the play for Columbia's Silhouette Stages that opens Friday, May 24. "In the director's notes, one of the things I wrote was, 'This show is as relevant now as it was when it was written,' " said Ross, who is sharing directorial duties with her frequent collaborator Debbie Mobley.
NEWS
By JOE DZIEMIANOWICZ and JOE DZIEMIANOWICZ,NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | February 19, 2006
Many men have razzle-dazzled us with smooth dance moves: Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly and John Travolta immediately spring to mind. But John O'Hurley, now starring as sexy lawyer Billy Flynn in Chicago, deserves special props for executing the fanciest footwork in recent history. The 51-year-old actor has managed to foxtrot, tango and waltz his way from being a stooge to a stud. That's no mean feat - especially when you've been pigeonholed as a completely different kind of show-biz being for a decade.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | December 18, 2005
CHICAGO: THE RAZZLE-DAZZLE EDITION / / Miramax Home Entertainment / / $29.99 Three years after its Best Picture Oscar, Chicago remains the zingiest movie of its kind since Cabaret (1972). The DVD premiere of The Razzle-Dazzle Edition puts director-choreographer Rob Marshall's great success on the home-video front line before the national rollout of Marshall's Memoirs of a Geisha. Not even legendary filmmaker William A. Wellman, in Roxie Hart (1942), showed as much panache as Marshall in mounting the lowdown-classic story of a Roaring '20s chorine who uses her notoriety as a killer to fuel showbiz celebrity.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 30, 2003
Hello, suckers. Welcome back," the character of Velma Kelly says to the audience after intermission in the musical Chicago. So what does that make us? Not suckers. Granted, this is the third time Baltimore has welcomed a touring production of the stylish and steamy Tony Award-winning Broadway revival. But the top-notch company playing the Lyric Opera House through Sunday is very welcome indeed. For theatergoers who have seen the recent Academy Award-winning movie, taking the show in this time around will be a different experience.
EXPLORE
May 26, 2011
It's a little-known fact now, but when the musical "Chicago" made its Broadway debut in 1975, it wasn't much of a hit, running less than a thousand performances. It only became a smash musical and movie when it was revived decades later. That's because it was way ahead of its time, said Conni Ross, who is co-directing a revival of the play for Columbia's Silhouette Stages that opens Friday, May 24. "In the director's notes, one of the things I wrote was, 'This show is as relevant now as it was when it was written,' " said Ross, who is sharing directorial duties with her frequent collaborator Debbie Mobley.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2011
The Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre opens its 45th season of outdoor shows on May 26 with a production of the John Kander and Fred Ebb musical "Chicago. " Bob Fosse's sassy choreography, which helped define the 1975 show, was much in evidence at a recent rehearsal in the West Annapolis Elementary School auditorium, where the dancing was so seductive that the utilitarian setting hardly mattered. In rehearsals, you can discover a director's goals and discern how near he is to achieving them.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 27, 2002
Chicago is the zingiest, most inventive movie of its kind since Cabaret. It leaves viewers feeling juiced-up, smart, alive - clamoring for a new era of big-screen musicals with sass and sensibility. Director-choreographer Rob Marshall and screenwriter Bill Condon embrace the effrontery of the lowdown-classic story. Once again, a Roaring '20s chorine named Roxie Hart (Renee Zellweger) and a headliner named Velma Kelley (Catherine Zeta-Jones) use their notoriety as killers to fuel show-biz celebrity.
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