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By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | July 23, 2007
You may not have heard, but Maryland has gone Irish of late: a new archbishop named O'Brien, a governor named O'Malley with a fondness for Celtic rock, and a fourth Irish pub coming to the state's capital city. That's not quite an invasion, but it was enough to bring some extra solidarity on a recent night to a peculiar group of Murphys, McGlincheys, Boyles and others who get together every few days to hone their skills in a grueling, 2,000-year-old Irish pastime. Rowing at a steady speed in a 25-foot canoelike boat called a currach, members of the Annapolis Irish Rowing Club stand out in this part of the Chesapeake, as they battle for space with the small yachts, powerboats, sailboats and kayaks that predominate here.
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SPORTS
By Aaron Dodson and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
On Sunday, Baltimore Rowing Club Director of Youth Rowing Judd Anderson stood up during the service at his church to give an announcement. But while he began to share the news that 17 of his rowers will attend this weekend's USRowing Youth National Championships in Sacramento, Calif., Anderson began to choke up. It's the most rowers the club has ever sent, but that's not the only reason Anderson became emotional. In 2011, he began a program through the club named Reach High Baltimore: Rowers Empowering Baltimore Youth as a way introduce inner-city students from sixth to 11th grade to the sport.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | October 11, 1990
As the sun pops over the Eastern skies, at the hour when most other people are still in bed, eight rowers lift a boat and carry it to the edge of the Patapsco River's Middle Branch.In early morning light, this party of men and women launch the Ariel, a rowing shell named for a Baltimore sporting tradition once as well known as the Preakness. From 1864 through the 1930s, the Ariel Rowing Club dominated what was referred to as Baltimore's "Patapsco navy."The present-day Ariel is the property of the Baltimore Rowing Club, a group of about 170 who operate out of a spiffy, city-owned boat house on Waterview Avenue, just west of the Hanover Street Bridge near Cherry Hill.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | July 23, 2007
You may not have heard, but Maryland has gone Irish of late: a new archbishop named O'Brien, a governor named O'Malley with a fondness for Celtic rock, and a fourth Irish pub coming to the state's capital city. That's not quite an invasion, but it was enough to bring some extra solidarity on a recent night to a peculiar group of Murphys, McGlincheys, Boyles and others who get together every few days to hone their skills in a grueling, 2,000-year-old Irish pastime. Rowing at a steady speed in a 25-foot canoelike boat called a currach, members of the Annapolis Irish Rowing Club stand out in this part of the Chesapeake, as they battle for space with the small yachts, powerboats, sailboats and kayaks that predominate here.
SPORTS
By Chrissy King and Chrissy King,Evening Sun Staff | January 25, 1991
Keeping fit in the winter has always been a tough job for athletes who participate in summer sports. Runners who have no access to padded indoor tracks must face the dreary cold. Bicyclists who are forced to cycle on stationary bikes often lose the intensity of a similar workout on the road.Until a few years ago, rowers had it even worse. They had no way to train when freezing weather hit. Then in 1978, a Vermont company invented the ergometer, an indoor stationary rowing machine.Training on the ergometer soon became monotonous.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | August 22, 1994
Meg Mitchell distinctly remembers her reaction when a friend told her she was forming a rowing club and asked her to join."I thought it sounded as exciting as watching grass grow."But the 12 years since she helped start the Annapolis Rowing Club has changed her mind. Mrs. Mitchell, a business teacher at Archbishop Spalding High School, now can hardly wait to come home from work, push her shell out onto the calm waters of College Creek, and lose herself in the quest for the perfect stroke.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff Writer | October 11, 1992
Their sweat shirts proclaimed "JUST CREW IT." Their face glowed with high spirits and health.Seven members of the Johns Hopkins rowing crew stood in a field by Marley Creek early yesterday while Megan Hutcheson, their coxswain, pinned their blue shorts tight about their knees."
NEWS
By Sue du Pont and Sue du Pont,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2001
EARLY MORNING crossings of the Severn River offer beautiful sunrises and glimpses of a few boaters. Three mornings a week during the summer, at least four of these boats are rowing shells propelled by Annapolis Rowing Club (ARC) junior crews. The club has almost 60 juniors - so named because of their ninth-grade to 12th-grade age group category at regattas. These students come from more than a dozen high schools in and around Anne Arundel County. "The junior program began in the mid-'80s with only about six or eight kids," says Lisa Van Citters, coordinator of the junior program.
NEWS
By BONITA FORMWALT | October 6, 1993
She stood in the dining room, her arms full of Martha Stewart books, silk sunflowers and a melon baller. She was prepared to plan a party. My party.I had casually mentioned that there was going to be a boating regatta on the creek next to my house. Wouldn't it be fun to have a few friends over to watch the races? Hot dogs on the grill, a bag of Cheetos, some potato salad?"Potato salad!" She blanched. "No, no. This could be the social event of the season. Would the Kennedys serve a mayonnaise-based vegetable dish?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | June 10, 1999
Fiddling aroundSit back and toe-tap all day long Sunday at the Fiddlers' Convention at the Carroll County Farm Museum, 500 S. Center St. in Westminster. From 9:30 a.m. to 8 p.m., musicians and vocalists will perform old-time and bluegrass styles of American folk music while competing for prizes totaling more than $3,000. Admission is $8; $2 ages 7 to 18; free for ages 6 and under with a paying adult. Call 410-848-7775.Waterfront Arts FestivalDive right in to the Annapolis Waterfront Arts Festival this weekend on the banks of College Creek at the St. John's College campus, off Rowe Boulevard in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,sun reporter | June 24, 2007
About a year ago, Akeem Smith was a 220-pound football player at Cherry Hill's New Era Academy with slipping grades and a knack for getting into fights. An administrator at the charter school encouraged the teenager to join an experimental program that initiates city youths into competitive rowing. Today, Smith is 30 pounds leaner and a better student, and he hopes to attend college on a crew scholarship. "It keeps me out of trouble, believe it or not," the 17-year-old says with a bemused smile.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH COE and ELIZABETH COE,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | October 12, 2005
As if getting up before sunrise with sore arms, an aching back and blistered hands is not dedication enough, crew teams in Maryland find themselves facing increasing competition these days for space on the state's crowded waterways. "It has now become the number of boats on the water and the difficulty with the height of wakes that make it hard to train safely and accommodate the crews," said Rick Clothier, director of rowing for the Naval Academy. Clothier has worked with Navy crew for the past 31 years.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2005
Back in college there were some hard and fast rules about members of the crew team. They got up early in the morning. They were constantly going to the gym. They told stories about getting sick after working out. They were super tall and didn't have a pinch of fat on their bodies. That's why it was a little surprising to find a jolly group of rowers ready to hit the water at 6:15 p.m. (yes: p.m.) Monday at the St. John's College boathouse. The hour was far too reasonable for proper rowing.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2004
ANAHEIM, Calif. - Apparently, this revival by the Orioles plays out just as well on the opposite coast. It stands up to exhausting cross-country travel and time zone changes. It's also heat resistant, preventing a season-long winning streak from melting into defeat, and immune to the game-changing effects of the Rally Monkey. How much further can it go? The Orioles have to wonder after getting a season-high 20 hits and just enough out of right-hander Daniel Cabrera, to produce an 11-3 victory over the Anaheim Angels last night and move them within three games of .500 for the first time in two months.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2002
Donna Meoli, youth group leader at Emmanuel United Methodist Church in Laurel, brought seven teen-agers to the far reaches of Baltimore's harbor yesterday. They didn't come to sightsee or shop, but to help clear the shores of Middle Branch of debris. The group worked with more than 400 other volunteers who joined the city's first Middle Branch Clean Up, an effort that targeted about 8 miles of shoreline layered with trash. The teens climbed over rocks, occasionally slipping into the cool water near the Baltimore Rowing Club.
NEWS
By Sue du Pont and Sue du Pont,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2001
EARLY MORNING crossings of the Severn River offer beautiful sunrises and glimpses of a few boaters. Three mornings a week during the summer, at least four of these boats are rowing shells propelled by Annapolis Rowing Club (ARC) junior crews. The club has almost 60 juniors - so named because of their ninth-grade to 12th-grade age group category at regattas. These students come from more than a dozen high schools in and around Anne Arundel County. "The junior program began in the mid-'80s with only about six or eight kids," says Lisa Van Citters, coordinator of the junior program.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH COE and ELIZABETH COE,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | October 12, 2005
As if getting up before sunrise with sore arms, an aching back and blistered hands is not dedication enough, crew teams in Maryland find themselves facing increasing competition these days for space on the state's crowded waterways. "It has now become the number of boats on the water and the difficulty with the height of wakes that make it hard to train safely and accommodate the crews," said Rick Clothier, director of rowing for the Naval Academy. Clothier has worked with Navy crew for the past 31 years.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2002
Donna Meoli, youth group leader at Emmanuel United Methodist Church in Laurel, brought seven teen-agers to the far reaches of Baltimore's harbor yesterday. They didn't come to sightsee or shop, but to help clear the shores of Middle Branch of debris. The group worked with more than 400 other volunteers who joined the city's first Middle Branch Clean Up, an effort that targeted about 8 miles of shoreline layered with trash. The teens climbed over rocks, occasionally slipping into the cool water near the Baltimore Rowing Club.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | June 10, 1999
Fiddling aroundSit back and toe-tap all day long Sunday at the Fiddlers' Convention at the Carroll County Farm Museum, 500 S. Center St. in Westminster. From 9:30 a.m. to 8 p.m., musicians and vocalists will perform old-time and bluegrass styles of American folk music while competing for prizes totaling more than $3,000. Admission is $8; $2 ages 7 to 18; free for ages 6 and under with a paying adult. Call 410-848-7775.Waterfront Arts FestivalDive right in to the Annapolis Waterfront Arts Festival this weekend on the banks of College Creek at the St. John's College campus, off Rowe Boulevard in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | August 22, 1994
Meg Mitchell distinctly remembers her reaction when a friend told her she was forming a rowing club and asked her to join."I thought it sounded as exciting as watching grass grow."But the 12 years since she helped start the Annapolis Rowing Club has changed her mind. Mrs. Mitchell, a business teacher at Archbishop Spalding High School, now can hardly wait to come home from work, push her shell out onto the calm waters of College Creek, and lose herself in the quest for the perfect stroke.
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