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NEWS
April 21, 2010
"Trendy" neighborhoods with bars are not the lone sufferers of the public drinking problem ("Council chief calls for higher fines to curb public drunkenness," April 19). Anyone who lives within 10 miles of a college/university along Charles Street or York Road is all too painfully aware of the problems associated with mass drinking and neighborhood disturbances. Curbing rowdy drinkers should be standard public policy. Why is Baltimore always so behind the curve? Let's get smart like D.C. and Philly and adopt legislation that benefits tax-paying residents for a change.
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SPORTS
By Aaron Oster and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
WWE Hall of Famer "Rowdy" Roddy Piper is in a new movie, "Pro Wrestlers vs. Zombies. " I had a chance to speak with him about the movie, the upcoming Wrestlemania, the WWE Network, his feelings toward WWE and their feelings toward him. Ring Posts: Are you going to be involved at all with Wrestlemania Weekend? Roddy Piper: I'm going to be there. You know, that's a good question. I have a lot of thoughts about it. I don't know any other entertainment sport where 30 years later you could give the fans the opportunity to see the two guys who started it at the War to Settle The Score.
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SPORTS
By Sandra Mckee | June 19, 1992
Midfielder Billy Ronson, who was told he would not be re-signed by the Blast, has signed a 30-day contract with the Tampa Bay Rowdies in the American Professional Soccer League.Ronson had a lengthy outdoor career in the English Football League, playing for Barnsley, Blackpool and Cardiff City, before joining the Blast of the Major Soccer League in February 1986.Ronson, 35, had an off-season with the Blast in 1991-92 because of a knee injury that required surgery in late March. Though fully recovered, Ronson was not offered a contract for the coming season.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
With four seconds remaining in the Super Bowl , fans across the Baltimore area clenched fists and clasped hands in prayer. "This is the longest four seconds of my life," said Karen Connell, 36, who stared at a television at 3 Miles House in Baltimore's Remington neighborhood. Baltimore spent most of three quarters of the Super Bowl in jubilation, only to descend into anxious quietude as the San Francisco 49ers clawed back into a game that the Ravens seemed to have had in hand.
SPORTS
By Joel Poiley and Joel Poiley,Special to The Sun | June 2, 1991
TAMPA, Fla. -- Kevin Sloan's unassisted goal 25 minutes into the second half gave the Maryland Bays a 1-0 victory over Tampa Bay in an American Professional Soccer League match at the University of South Florida Soccer Stadium Saturday.The victory kept the Bays (5-0) atop the Western Conference standings. It was Maryland's 13th straight APSL victory, including playoffs, during the past two seasons.Tampa Bay (1-4) lost its third straight. Maryland, the defending APSL champion, has defeated the Rowdies six straight times since 1989, including a 3-0 win May 25 at Cedar Lane Park in Columbia, Md.Sloan's goal was set up by Jean Harbor, who dribbled past two defenders deep into Tampa Bay territory.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | February 27, 1994
From The Sun Feb. 27-March 5, 1844* Feb. 28: Young Rowdies -- A party of half grown lads have been in the habit of assembling about the neighborhood of the Front Street Theater, pitching cents and insulting by most abusive and vulgar language all passers by.* March 2: Large flocks of wild geese passed over the city onSaturday and yesterday, wending their way to the north. This is regarded by most people as an unerring sign of the breaking up of winter.From The Sun Feb. 27-March 5, 1894* Feb. 27: The question whether street railway companies using cables are responsible for the damage caused when a carriage wheel slips into the cable slot is raised by a suit of Joseph E. Baker against the Traction Company.
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | December 16, 1992
Three players with Maryland ties have been offered contracts and invited to train for the U.S. team that will compete in the 1994 World Cup. They are Desmond Armstrong, originally of Columbia, former Maryland Bays and Baltimore Blast forward Jean Harbor, who lives in Adelphi, and Bruce Murray of Germantown, a longtime member of the U.S. national team.Altogether, 20 U.S. National Team players received invitations yesterday to relocate to Mission Viejo, Calif., the training site for the U.S. team.
NEWS
July 6, 1994
Does historic Ellicott City have a problem with rowdy loiterers who drink alcohol openly and intimidate visitors to the restaurants, antique shops and gift boutiques on Main Street?The answer depends on whom you ask. If there is such a problem, say some merchants and regular visitors, it's a minor one, especially compared to the panhandling on regular display in downtown Baltimore.Still other merchants, led by the Ellicott City Business Association, complain that the situation is bad enough to have a noticeable negative impact on local commerce.
NEWS
April 20, 2010
Baltimore took an important step to increase the city's vibrancy last year when it expanded the ability of bars and restaurants to offer live entertainment. But left somewhat unresolved were the more unsavory aspects of the nightlife we do have. After all, "vibrant city" and "drunken people vomiting in flowerpots" don't really go together. That's why City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young's attention to the issue of nuisance crimes in some of Baltimore's bar-hoppingest neighborhoods is so important.
NEWS
By Robin Miller | December 30, 1997
EVERY NEW Year's Eve I watch Baltimore City become a temporary law-free zone where suburban yahoos act in ways they wouldn't dare behave in White Marsh or Columbia or Severna Park.Tomorrow night, in Fells Point, thousands of spoiled 20-somethings will all try to park in the few parking spaces directly in front of the bars on Broadway and get frustrated when they can't. Some will yell obscenities. Others will get into fights.Parking paradeThen, plenty of others will drive around so long looking for a parking space that when they do find one on a lot, they'll have to promptly relieve themselves on the first brick wall they see. They rightly gamble that there's no police around issuing tickets for public urination.
NEWS
July 3, 2012
With thousands of people expected to converge on downtown Baltimore tomorrow to celebrate the Fourth of July holiday, city police will be out in force to ensure the safety of residents and visitors to the area. Baltimore officials have made securing the Inner Harbor and its environs a top priority, and with any luck, by the time the crowds finally head home tomorrow night everyone will have had the opportunity to enjoy a safe and memorable Independence Day . The event is a crucial one for the city, as it comes after months of news reports about youth mobs in the area onSt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, Special To The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
On a recent, unseasonably warm Thursday night, Federal Hill was jumping with people out on dates - out for happy hour, out for dinner. But Spoons, the laid-back coffee shop that's been a Cross Street fixture since 1999, was quiet, with just a few tables filled. With a menu featuring an intriguingly global mix of comfort foods and service that's friendly and prompt, Spoons is worthy of a little more bustle at dinner time. But, please, not too much more bustle. When the restaurant's owners, Shane Anderson, John Allen, Bernard Kayes and Deborah Cogan, decided last fall to add dinner to Spoons' repertoire, they recognized that the mellow atmosphere offered a welcome alternative to many of Federal Hill's more manic spots.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | March 19, 2012
UPDATE: Police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi, after revewing the video and the photos from Canton, said promised better police deployment next year: “There is no question the neighborhood was destroyed, and it shouldn't have been. It looked like a garbage dump. Homeowners deserve better.” St. Patrick's Day celebrations got a bit out of hand in several Baltimore neighborhoods, with police arresting 10 juveniles Saturday night in the Inner Harbor after a stabbing and at least one fight broke out downtown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2011
On Friday, there will be a pingpong tournament in Baltimore. It won't take place at an arena or a YMCA. It's at a bar. The pingpong tournament is one of the distinguishing features of Parkside Sports Bar and Pub, which opened in Canton late last year. Parkside is a sports bar with modest ambitions. Its casual setup and fairly small beer selection suggest it wants to just be a neighborhood hangout. But its size, its pool and pingpong tables, its gregarious bartenders and customers make it an upbeat place to watch a game - or play one - after work.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2011
A woman in a red bikini danced giddily on a big floating trampoline in the Magothy River, at one point turning a graceful back flip — without losing her straw hat. Her apparent carefree delight captured what fans consider the true spirit of Bumper Bash, a yearly convergence of boat-borne revelers. But on Saturday, the men in blue were no less a part of the story at the party's fifth-annual installment. Spurred by multiple fights and drunken rowdiness last year, authorities stepped up the police presence considerably, both along the Dobbins Island beach and in the river.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2011
Owners of Looney's Pub in Maple Lawn were fined $5,000 by Howard County's liquor board for a series of infractions during the first few months after the establishment opened in spring 2009. The fine was imposed Monday by the County Council, sitting as the liquor board. The council members normally hear only unusual or serious liquor cases, leaving the majority to an appointed Alcoholic Beverage Hearing Board. Looney's problems began opening day, March 14, 2009, when two county police officers saw children playing the bar's electronic games.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | December 11, 1994
FROSTBURG -- Like residents of any college town, Frostburg's citizens have seen -- and tolerated -- a lot of young-adult foolishness since the town's 5,000-student state university opened 92 years ago as Maryland Normal School No. 2.But this fall, Frostburg State's status as town focal point and largest economic pillar notwithstanding, community leaders decided they had tolerated all the student drinking and partying they could stomach -- and they cracked...
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
Who can forget Preakness 2006, when Barbaro, a favorite to win the Triple Crown, collapsed in the first furlong with a fractured leg, prompting a police-escorted caravan up Interstate 95 to a veterinary hospital in Pennsylvania? Or Preakness 2002, when Baltimore police officers removed their badges and nameplates and were caught on video hitting a spectator with a baton during a melee in the raucous infield, embarrassing the department when it was aired nationally on ESPN? Or Preakness 1999, when drunken Lee Chang Ferrell scaled an infield fence, stood in front of eight charging horses during the seventh race — thankfully, not the live-on-national-television stakes race — and swung at the favorite, Artax?
NEWS
April 21, 2010
"Trendy" neighborhoods with bars are not the lone sufferers of the public drinking problem ("Council chief calls for higher fines to curb public drunkenness," April 19). Anyone who lives within 10 miles of a college/university along Charles Street or York Road is all too painfully aware of the problems associated with mass drinking and neighborhood disturbances. Curbing rowdy drinkers should be standard public policy. Why is Baltimore always so behind the curve? Let's get smart like D.C. and Philly and adopt legislation that benefits tax-paying residents for a change.
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