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By Ed Bark and Ed Bark,Dallas Morning News | June 8, 1993
Having graduated from schools of hard knocks, Nick Lewis and Arthur Clark yearn to be roads scholars.Their mentor is a mint condition '61 Corvette convertible that grades on the curve. Their learning experiences invariably involve a curvy girl or two encountered during detours from long, lonesome highways. You're now up to speed on NBC's "Route 66," distant relative of the original 1960s series starring Marty Milner and George Maharis as Tod Stiles and Buz Murdock.Sight unseen, I assumed the new "Route 66," [which premieres tonight at 8 on WMAR (Channel 2)
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2012
Baltimoreans and Marylanders have become blase about actors being in their midst, along with bellowing directors, film crews, blocked-off streets filled with Hollywood's iconic caravans of trucks, trailers and spotlights, and sidewalks choked with zig-zagging electrical cables. We've finally caught up with Los Angeles, where locals consider it exceedingly bad form to stop and gawk at a film shoot or pester celebrities. In Baltimore, first it was Barry Levinson who aroused our interest in filmmaking when he turned back the clock to 1959 during the filming of his comedy-drama "Diner" here in 1982, filling the streets with vintage 1950s cars and actors in period clothing.
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FEATURES
By Mark de la Vina | December 22, 1991
Just how profoundly is U.S. Route 66 branded on the American psyche? Consider these examples of the highway in popular culture:"Route 66," the song written by character actor Bobby Troup -- he drove a jeep in the film "M.A.S.H." -- was recorded by Nat King Cole, Natalie Cole, the Replacements, the Rolling Stones, Asleep at the Wheel, Depeche Mode and Michael Martin Murphey, among others. The Quality Inn in Kingman, Ariz., features the Bobby Troup Room, where the songwriter supposedly slept.
EXPLORE
October 10, 2011
An article in the Oct. 12, 1961 edition of the Herald Argus and Baltimore Countian reported that the cast and crew of a popular television series was in town. Hollywood came to Catonsville this past week as Lancer Productions, Inc., producers of the television show "Route 66", brought a cavalcade of cast, technicians, staff and big vans full of equipment into the Baltimore area to film three episodes for the series. Catonsville was chosen as the setting for many scenes in one of the forthcoming episodes, "Bridge Across Five Days" which was written by Howard Rodman.
FEATURES
By Bill Hanna and Bill Hanna,KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | December 30, 2000
EL RENO, Okla. - Even though it was known as "The Mother Road" by millions of motorists heading westward during its nearly 75-year existence, Route 66 doesn't look like much up close. A dozen weathered sections sitting in the middle of red clay aren't very imposing. But this original concrete segment of the road was deemed so valuable that Route 66 aficionados protested its destruction and the Smithsonian Institution scrambled to save a portion for a new transportation exhibit opening in 2003.
FEATURES
By Mark de la Vina and Mark de la Vina,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 22, 1991
Forget the Autobahn. Block out the Appian Way. Try not to think about any other celebrated roads and get hip to this tiny tip.There's no cooler highway around than U.S. Route 66, the lore-loaded, 2,448-mile asphalt serpent that will turn 66 next month.Sure, the last segment of Route 66, for decades a link between California and the eastern United States, was decommissioned in 1985, but about 90 percent of what author John Steinbeck called the "Mother Highway," still exists, though without the historic number.
TRAVEL
By SAN JOSE (CALIF.) MERCURY NEWS | November 11, 2007
I've always wanted to drive Route 66, starting from California. Is there a group or club that makes an annual caravan? You can find tours making the Chicago-to-Santa Monica, Calif., trek on historic Route 66, but you'll have to wait a bit if you want to join them. Both have completed their trips for this year. In any case, its unlikely you'll find any caravans or clubs going west to east, primarily because they prefer to stay true to the path traveled by migrants who made the long journey to find work in California.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1997
Summertime (almost), and the living is easy. So go outside and enjoy it; there's sure not much to watch on the tube."Oops! The World's Funniest Outtakes No. 6" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Will these outtake shows never end? Guess not, since Fox is adding a weekly version to its schedule come fall. Fox."Pearl" (8: 30 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Frankie's mom arrives in town to tell Frankie (Kevin Corrigan) she's leaving his dad. What she doesn't mention is that she's having an affair with Prof.
TRAVEL
By Joy Tipping and Joy Tipping,The Dallas Morning News | December 23, 2007
ARCADIA, Okla. -- You can see the big, glowing thing from a couple of miles away on historic Route 66, and as you approach from the east, you wonder what it is: A rocket ship at an amusement park? Surely not out here in the middle of nowhere. A giant, glowing Q-tip, like they used to have at the Johnson & Johnson factories? Nope, wrong shape. You get closer, and it becomes clear. It's an enormous soda bottle, 66 feet tall (in homage to Route 66), complete with a straw. When the bottle is lighted at night, it changes colors, morphing from soft grape to lemon yellow to cherry red. If ever there was an instance of advertising matching substance, this is it. The store behind the bottle, Pops, which opened in August, sells nearly 500 kinds of soda pop, along with soda-fountain-type food, shakes, souvenirs and gasoline.
TRAVEL
By Linda Duval and Linda Duval,COLORADO SPRINGS GAZETTE | July 22, 2001
Remnants of Route 66 mark the West like Burma Shave road signs. Singly, they seem out of context, but collectively they tell a tale. There's everything from the famous Richardson Trading Post in downtown Gallup, N.M., to an abandoned gas station piled with tumbleweeds near remote Peach Springs, Ariz. But nowhere is the architecture and history more collected and well preserved than in Albuquerque, N.M. "If you're only going to see one part of old Route 66, you should see it in Albuquerque," says Quinta Scott, photographer and author of Along Route 66, (University of Oklahoma Press, $34.95)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 4, 2009
With any luck, "My One and Only" will draw the same crowds that have made "Julie & Julia" a holdover hit. It's affable entertainment - a road movie with a smart map and characters who are unpredictable human beings, not just billboard attractions. Charlie Peters wrote the charming script with a choice female protagonist. When Ann Devereaux (Renee Zellweger) leaves her boyishly charismatic, unfaithful husband, Dan (Kevin Bacon), a high-society bandleader, in Manhattan and takes her two teenage sons, George (Logan Lerman)
TRAVEL
By Joy Tipping and Joy Tipping,The Dallas Morning News | December 23, 2007
ARCADIA, Okla. -- You can see the big, glowing thing from a couple of miles away on historic Route 66, and as you approach from the east, you wonder what it is: A rocket ship at an amusement park? Surely not out here in the middle of nowhere. A giant, glowing Q-tip, like they used to have at the Johnson & Johnson factories? Nope, wrong shape. You get closer, and it becomes clear. It's an enormous soda bottle, 66 feet tall (in homage to Route 66), complete with a straw. When the bottle is lighted at night, it changes colors, morphing from soft grape to lemon yellow to cherry red. If ever there was an instance of advertising matching substance, this is it. The store behind the bottle, Pops, which opened in August, sells nearly 500 kinds of soda pop, along with soda-fountain-type food, shakes, souvenirs and gasoline.
TRAVEL
By SAN JOSE (CALIF.) MERCURY NEWS | November 11, 2007
I've always wanted to drive Route 66, starting from California. Is there a group or club that makes an annual caravan? You can find tours making the Chicago-to-Santa Monica, Calif., trek on historic Route 66, but you'll have to wait a bit if you want to join them. Both have completed their trips for this year. In any case, its unlikely you'll find any caravans or clubs going west to east, primarily because they prefer to stay true to the path traveled by migrants who made the long journey to find work in California.
NEWS
By Jonathan Kirsch and Jonathan Kirsch,Los Angeles Times | July 22, 2007
By Michael Wallis and Michael S. Williamson W.W. Norton / 320 pages / $39.95 The road trip is an essential American experience that has inspired books, movies and television programs, including The Grapes of Wrath, Route 66 and Thelma & Louise. More than a decade before the building of the Mother Road - U.S. 66, which connected Chicago and Santa Monica, Calif., in 1926 - the audacious dream of crossing the entire continent on blacktop was given a certain reality in the designation of the Lincoln Highway, a route that exists today along some of those back roads that William Least Heat-Moon describes in a classic of road-trip literature, Blue Highways.
TRAVEL
July 10, 2005
Heights of Scotland Rugged scenery attracts royals, commoners alike You don't have to be royal to enjoy a majestic time in the Scottish Highlands near Balmoral, the sweeping estate where Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, spent their recent honeymoon. All you need is an appetite for healthy outdoor pursuits and enough time to appreciate the beautiful scenery of purple heather-clad glens, rich pine woods and flowing rivers. Anyone in a rush risks being frustrated by the twisty, narrow Highland roads that can turn a trip of several dozen miles into a long drive, albeit one the traveler is unlikely to forget -- not least because of the locals' alarmingly fast driving.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2001
DULUTH, Ga. - Fred Funk has spent most of the summer in rehab. A week before the U.S. Open at Southern Hills, Funk fell off his son's dirt bike and wound up with a sore shoulder. A week after the Open, he was racing up a hill during the Buick Classic against Brett Quigley and came up lame. "I was winning at the time," Funk recalled yesterday. The race, not the tournament. The previous injury was tendinitis and made him alter his swing. The latest injury, a badly bruised knee, kept him home in Florida for three weeks.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | April 21, 1994
Three years ago, Gayle Garivaltis-James decided to pitch her 18-year career in the insurance industry and look for a new trail.Where the Columbia resident ended up was Route 66.Route 66 Foods, that is, a Southwestern-style seasonings company her brother, George Garivaltis, launched after a trip to Albuquerque, N.M.The idea for the company hit Mr. Garivaltis and his wife, Hilary, when they stumbled across a small line of chili and taco seasonings that an...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 1, 2001
"Route 66: The Mother Road, 75th Anniversary Edition," by Michael Wallis (St. Martin's Press, 276 pages, $19.95). There's an Interstate 66 today -- starting out just west of Washington. But the real Route 66 begins in Chicago's Grant Park and runs two-thirds of the way across the nation to Santa Monica. It was opened on Nov. 11, 1926, and immeditately became a road of dreams, song and story. John Steinbeck christened it "The Mother Road." It was, in a very real way, America's first grand highway.
TRAVEL
By Linda Duval and Linda Duval,COLORADO SPRINGS GAZETTE | July 22, 2001
Remnants of Route 66 mark the West like Burma Shave road signs. Singly, they seem out of context, but collectively they tell a tale. There's everything from the famous Richardson Trading Post in downtown Gallup, N.M., to an abandoned gas station piled with tumbleweeds near remote Peach Springs, Ariz. But nowhere is the architecture and history more collected and well preserved than in Albuquerque, N.M. "If you're only going to see one part of old Route 66, you should see it in Albuquerque," says Quinta Scott, photographer and author of Along Route 66, (University of Oklahoma Press, $34.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 1, 2001
"Route 66: The Mother Road, 75th Anniversary Edition," by Michael Wallis (St. Martin's Press, 276 pages, $19.95). There's an Interstate 66 today -- starting out just west of Washington. But the real Route 66 begins in Chicago's Grant Park and runs two-thirds of the way across the nation to Santa Monica. It was opened on Nov. 11, 1926, and immeditately became a road of dreams, song and story. John Steinbeck christened it "The Mother Road." It was, in a very real way, America's first grand highway.
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