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By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
Developers plan to build 1,700 housing units near a mixed-use business park in White Marsh, saying it will "supercharge" an area that had previously been targeted for job creation. The $100 million development, Greenleigh at Crossroads, would be part of the 1,000-acre Baltimore Crossroads @95. Baltimore County officials announced the plans Wednesday with representatives from developer St. John Properties and Somerset Construction Co. St. John officials said they'll break ground on the 200-acre project — which will include single-family houses, townhouses, condominium units and apartments — within the next year to 18 months.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
Developers plan to build 1,700 housing units near a mixed-use business park in White Marsh, saying it will "supercharge" an area that had previously been targeted for job creation. The $100 million development, Greenleigh at Crossroads, would be part of the 1,000-acre Baltimore Crossroads @95. Baltimore County officials announced the plans Wednesday with representatives from developer St. John Properties and Somerset Construction Co. St. John officials said they'll break ground on the 200-acre project — which will include single-family houses, townhouses, condominium units and apartments — within the next year to 18 months.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2003
Baltimore County is testing the power of pavement. Local and state leaders have bet more than $60 million that extending a four-lane highway almost four miles from White Marsh to Middle River will bring at least 10,000 jobs to an area in need of a shot in the arm. Usually, a road project is as much about getting commuters safely and speedily from point A to point B as getting businesses to move in. Baltimore County's Route 43 extension was conceived purely...
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2013
Eastern Baltimore County residents say a bill before the County Council could open the door to poorly planned development on a key tract in the Middle River area near Route 43. "Let's work on a better bill, please," said Allen Robertson, president of the Bowleys Quarters Community Association, during a council work session Tuesday. Robertson said his group wants the council to withdraw or table the legislation. The measure, proposed by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's administration, would allow residential development on part of an 800-acre tract near White Marsh Boulevard that is now zoned for industrial use. County leaders once hoped the site would attract major employers.
NEWS
February 4, 1997
BALTIMORE COUNTY needs the extension of White Marsh Boulevard (Route 43) to Eastern Boulevard -- regardless of its impact on a controversial proposed motor raceway. The raceway must be dealt with separately, on its own merits. The merits of the extension are without question.A significant portion of County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger's east side revival plan rests on this proposed 3.2-mile piece of road, which would make it easy to get from Interstate 95 to east side marinas and to land zoned for commercial and manufacturing uses.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1999
While businesses urged the State Highway Administration last night to accelerate plans for a $60 million highway that would connect White Marsh with Middle River, residents wanted it stopped.The three-mile extension of Route 43 is intended to boost the sagging economic fortunes of the Middle River area by connecting Eastern Avenue with Pulaski Highway and opening about 2,000 acres of industrially zoned land to development, according to state and Baltimore County officials.Business groups told SHA officials at a public hearing in Essex last night that they favor the highway.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 13, 1999
James Withrow has taken his house off the market, Linda Felts may lose her dream home, and Russell Rose is not sure how much longer he will have his backyard vegetable garden.The neighbors along Bird River Road in the Middle River area are angry that their homes could be demolished because they are in the path of one of five routes proposed for Route 43, a $60 million highway connecting White Marsh with the Middle River corridor."Our lives are completely on hold by what the state is doing here," said Felts, 38.They plan to argue against the highway at a public hearing in Essex on Wednesday night, launch a petition drive and lobby state and county officials to keep the highway from being built.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1999
Baltimore County's roads stand to receive $351 million in state- and federally funded improvements during the next six years -- but local officials are asking for more.With a $200 million pot of transportation money up for grabs, Baltimore County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger renewed his push yesterday for the state to contribute $50 million toward the construction of a long-planned extension of Route 43 in White Marsh."This project opens up almost 700 acres for new commercial development," Ruppersberger told state transportation secretary John D. Porcari and his top aides, in town for their annual meeting on local road and transit projects.
NEWS
November 28, 1999
BALTIMORE County Councilman Vincent J. Gardina's proposed 18-moratorium on residential development may be just the device needed for the county to realize its economic development goals on the east side.Moratoriums generally act like floodgates. While in place, they stop development. Once they end, a torrent of development follows.Business development has always been the rationale for extending Route 43 beyond White Marsh to Middle River. Now that the road's construction is receiving its final approvals, county officials worry the new thoroughfare may generate a flurry of unintended residential growth.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson | June 6, 2004
Baltimore County officials say the key to more business on the east side is the extension of Route 43, a $65 million highway scheduled to be completed late next year. The road will allow more than 600 acres to be developed along the Interstate 95 corridor, extending from White Marsh to Middle River. County officials hope that a planned business park will attract biotech companies that will lead to more than 10,000 new jobs for the area. "We're looking for high-paying jobs," said David Iannucci, executive director of the county's Department of Economic Development.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2011
Baltimore County leaders hailed the official opening Wednesday of a 356-unit luxury apartment building on Route 43 in White Marsh as a magnet for businesses. About 83 units are ready for occupancy in the multi-story building, with a six-level garage, known as Arbors at Baltimore Crossroads, and 72 have been leased as of Wednesday, officials said. "This is a tremendous development that will attract other businesses and make White Marsh and Middle River destinations," said Councilwoman Cathy Bevins, a Democrat who represents the area.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2011
Restoring a cut made to a high-profile project at the height of the recession, the Maryland Transportation Authority, voted Thursday to build an interchange linking express toll lanes on Interstate 95 with Route 43 in White Marsh. The action by the authority's board brings the cost of a project that previously was estimated to slightly more than $1 billion. The board awarded a contract for $142.6 million to build the interchange, but offset all but $37 million of that with savings on other contracts in which the bids came in lower than estimated, authority chief engineer Doug Hutchinson said.
NEWS
September 27, 2008
Lawmaker sues; president of MSU promises contract 3 Making good on a threat, a state lawmaker sued the president of Morgan State University yesterday over the educator's refusal to release his employment contract. By afternoon, Del. Galen R. Clagett, a Frederick County Democrat who is on a panel that oversees Morgan's budget, had gotten word from state lawyers that Morgan had relented and that the contract was on its way. Clagett said he would drop the lawsuit once he gets the document.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | May 25, 2008
Of the eight possible sites for a new and larger park-and-ride at Interstate 95 and Route 152 in Joppa, state transportation officials' favorite is the least popular with residents. The preferred site is a nearly 10-acre wooded parcel just north of the interstate. "That is 10 acres of pristine woods that is our buffer from 95," said Vince Rabenau of Joppa during an informational meeting last week at the Joppa-Magnolia Fire Hall. The property, owned by Trinity Baptist Church, provides "a sanctuary from the noise, pollution and traffic," he said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | May 4, 2008
After reviewing construction options that would address growing congestion on Interstate 95 through Harford County, one group wants to take a wait-and-see stance, hoping to find local traffic relief from an $11 billion upgrade to the highway in Baltimore County. The project on 10 miles of I-95, known as Section 100, involves construction of several overpasses at the Baltimore Beltway and other intersections and the addition of toll lanes in both directions from I-895 to Route 43 in White Marsh.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | September 9, 2007
Harford County would get fewer jobs than projected from the expansion coming to Aberdeen Proving Ground, according to a new demographics study, and county officials say commercial construction must be accelerated. Those issues are likely to dominate a town hall meeting in Edgewood on Wednesday, when government officials provide an update on Harford's preparations for BRAC, the base expansion that promises to bring about 19,000 jobs to APG. The new projection of additional jobs was about 3,500 less than county officials' previous estimates, said James Richardson, the county's economic development director.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | October 23, 2006
As the first drivers roll down a new $75 million stretch of White Marsh Boulevard today, they will wind through one of the few large undeveloped commercial tracts on the East Coast accessible to Interstate 95. They will head toward a place that once provided a living for tens of thousands of workers but fell on hard times. And they will see the beginnings of what could be a new center of employment and the dollars that come with it. More than two decades in the works, the new Maryland Route 43 will open today with high expectations - and even a parade.
NEWS
November 29, 1993
Herb Haebler has had it up to here.Besides being an easy target for alliteration, the Perry Hall resident is upset with lack of thought given to the design of Route 43.For those of you unfamiliar with Route 43, or White Marsh Boulevard, it has become a real godsend for commuters living in the White Marsh area.Last January, the highway was extended west from Honeygo Boulevard to the Beltway. That meant White Marsh commuters could avoid the congested I-695/I-95 interchange, a significant benefit in rush hour.
NEWS
August 25, 2007
A Baltimore County police lieutenant enacted a short-lived policy requiring officers under his supervision to write an average of at least three traffic tickets each day they worked on patrol. Under the order, patrol officers' ability to get time off was linked to the number of tickets they wrote. Officers who did not meet the "expectation" and averaged fewer than one citation per day would be last to choose their days off, regardless of their shift seniority, according to the order. Lt. Dean E. Brubaker informed his officers of the requirement in March and documented it in a written order in May. County police spokesman Bill Toohey said the initiative was ended as soon as supervisors learned of it. "It was one lieutenant on one shift in one precinct three months ago," Toohey said yesterday.
NEWS
August 3, 2007
More than 20,000 motorists cross these "structurally deficient" bridges in the Baltimore area each day. Some are under construction or are being replaced, indicated by an asterisk. A sufficiency rating of 50 or less indicates a bridge that might need to be replaced. 1. Route 43 eastbound over Interstate 95 in Baltimore County. Sufficiency rating, 17.3. Date built, 1962.* 2. Interstate 95 southbound ramp over Interstate 95 northbound ramp just north of Kenwood Avenue in Baltimore County.
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