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NEWS
By Staff Writer | December 18, 1992
The State Highway Administration has decided to set up a temporary traffic circle in a western Howard County village to see if motorists are willing to accept Maryland's first "roundabout."The agency had proposed building a permanent roundabout at the intersection of Old National Pike (Route 144) and Route 94 in Lisbon in October. But the proposal drew criticism from the community.Liz Ziemski, an agency spokeswoman, said setting up a simulated roundabout using temporary signs and traffic cones or barrels is a compromise.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | July 18, 2013
Attorney Robert Erwin pruned ivy on a tree outside his house Sunday afternoon as cars rolled through Baltimore City's new roundabout at 39th Street and Canterbury Road. So, he was asked, is the traffic-calming device a good thing or a bad thing? “It's a bad thing,” Erwin declared. “It doesn't seem to be slowing down traffic, especially early in the morning during rush hour. And B, I think it's ugly.” But four days earlier, as a month of construction work wound down on the controversial traffic circle, 25 residents came together at the finished site July 10 for a group photo that also served as a show of solidarity and support, at least until the novelty wears off. “We're trying to be positive about it,” said Kenna Forsyth, a 37-year resident.
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NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | December 18, 1992
The State Highway Administration has decided to set up a temporary traffic circle in a western Howard County village to see if motorists are willing to accept Maryland's first "roundabout."The agency had proposed building a permanent roundabout at the intersection of Old National Pike (Route 144) and Route 94 in Lisbon in October. But the proposal drew substantial criticism from the community.In particular, some local residents objected to the idea that they were being used as part of an experiment by traffic engineers.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | August 21, 2012
Work has begun on what local public works officials say is Harford County's first mini-roundabout, being constructed at the intersection of West MacPhail and Tollgate roads in Bel Air. The project is expected to be completed prior to the Labor Day weekend, Sept. 1-3, the Harford County Department of Public Works said Monday. The intersection, which serves the Upper Chesapeake Medical Center as well as a number of residential neighborhoods, is closed while the work is being done.
NEWS
April 4, 1996
Construction is scheduled to start in mid-April on a traffic roundabout planned for the intersection of Route 140, Taneytown Road and Antrim Road in Taneytown.A roundabout is an intersection with one-way traffic around a central island. The State Highway Administration says that roundabouts have been proven to reduce accidents, traffic delays, fuel consumption, air pollution and maintenance costs.The construction will mean occasionally closing lanes between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 6 a.m., according to the SHA. Work is scheduled to be finished by late summer.
NEWS
February 16, 1994
When it comes to finding new solutions for traffic problems, state and local highway officials are turning more and more to an old concept.The old-fashioned traffic circle, or roundabout, seems to be catching on since the first modern one in Maryland was installed last spring in the western Howard County community of Lisbon. Now the State Highway Administration reportedly plans to build two more in the Baltimore metropolitan region -- one at Maryland Routes 2, 408 and 422 in the southern Anne Arundel County community of Lothian by this fall, and another at Routes 140 and 832 in Taneytown by the fall of 1995.
NEWS
August 9, 1993
When the State Highway Administration announced last fall that it would build Maryland's first modern roundabout at the intersection of Routes 144 and 94 in Lisbon, many residents of the west Howard County community objected."
NEWS
February 16, 1994
When it comes to finding new solutions for traffic problems, state and local highway officials are turning more and more to an old concept.The old-fashioned traffic circle, or roundabout, seems to be catching on since the first modern one in Maryland was installed last spring in the western Howard County community of Lisbon. Now the State Highway Administration reportedly plans to build two more in the Baltimore metropolitan region -- one at Maryland Routes 2, 408 and 422 in the southern Anne Arundel County community of Lothian by this fall, and another at Routes 140 and 832 in Taneytown by the fall of 1995.
NEWS
February 16, 1994
The crossing of Maryland Routes 2, 408 and 422 in the bayside, southern Anne Arundel County community of Lothian has long been a troublesome intersection for local drivers. Ruled only by a flashing red light and a large stop sign for east-west traffic and a flashing yellow for the north-south flow, this crossroads has been the scene of more than a few accidents caused by drivers who plowed through without heeding the signals.The State Highway Administration announced late last month that it wants to remedy the situation by replacing the four-way intersection with a traffic circle, or "roundabout," at a cost of about $175,000.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 30, 2012
Harford County plans to install what it calls a "mini-roundabout," the first of its kind, at the intersection of Tollgate and West MacPhail roads in Bel Air. The plan will be the subject of a public hearing Wednesday at the Bel Air library beginning at 6 p.m. The county only announced the hearing over the long holiday weekend. The four-way intersection to be served by the new roundabout is considered busy because it is a block from Upper Chesapeake Medical Center. It is also a block north of an existing roundabout at the three-way intersection of Tollgate Road and Markeplace Drive, one of the first roundabouts to be constructed in the greater Bel Air area.
EXPLORE
January 6, 2012
I would like to comment on the letter from Michael Ernest Sr. concerning "Too much speed and too little courtesy at Old Frederick circle" ( Catonsville Times, Dec. 28). I agree that people should show courtesy when driving. The statement that "a circle is just a special version of a four-way stop" is erroneous. Maryland State laws are available online at: http://www.mva.maryland.gov/Resources/DL-002A.pdf . Section I Roundabouts states: "Approach roads to roundabouts are controlled by yield signs.
EXPLORE
January 6, 2012
Related to the reply to my letter ("Yield to left at roundabout and to right at four-way stop," Catonsville Times, Jan. 4), I did not realize that drivers do not need to be courteous when using traffic circles. That writer's self-centered mentality would keep us "poor saps" stranded at one of other entrances to the circle when there is an unbroken queue of vehicles in one direction. This "poor sap," having learned the written rules for drivers approaching an intersection (with no stop signs or all direction stop signs)
EXPLORE
December 30, 2011
I am writing in response to the Dec. 28 letter regarding the traffic circle on Edmondson Avenue and Old Frederick Road ("Too much speed and too little courtesy at Old Frederick circle," Catonsville Times). According to the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration website, "Approach roads to roundabouts are controlled by yield signs. Entering traffic must always yield to traffic already in the roundabout. Cautiously approach the yield line and wait for an acceptable gap in traffic.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2011
City traffic engineers are working on the final design for a $7 million traffic circle at the intersection of Key Highway and Light Street. The roundabout — about half the size of the one in Towson — will replace the traffic lights at the gateway intersection that connects South Baltimore and the Inner Harbor near the Maryland Science Center . Construction could begin as soon as July. The intersection has long been a malfunction junction, with befuddled motorists and daredevil pedestrians mixing it up on a road surface scarred by old streetcar tracks.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2011
The State Highway Administration is taking another crack at the Towson roundabout — aiming to improve safety and traffic flow at an intersection that has bedeviled engineers for decades. The agency said it will launch a $632,000 project at the roundabout in the heart of the downtown area Tuesday, requiring a series of lane closings that will continue through late summer. The SHA said this round of work, unlike previous projects, is not intended to fix something wrong but to make permanent some of the changes it got right in 2008.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2010
Drivers will be detoured around Joppa Road near the Towson roundabout, starting Tuesday, as the county closes a section of the thoroughfare for repairs that are expected to continue through Sept. 1. "We want to get this job done as quickly as possible," said David Fidler, a spokesman for the Baltimore County Department of Public Works. He said signs would be installed letting drivers know about the closure. Barriers will be erected. The sidewalk will remain open. Drivers will be directed onto Towsontown Boulevard and Fairmount Avenue to the south and to Dulaney Valley Road and Goucher Boulevard to the north.
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