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By Kevin Cowherd | March 11, 2002
FIVE WEEKS from now, a man named Chris Cain will step on a golf course at Penn State University and try to boldly go where no golfer has gone before. In an astounding display of masochism, Cain will attempt to enter the Guinness Book of Records for the most golf holes played in 12 hours using a cart. For the uninitiated, an average round of golf takes about four hours, after which most golfers want nothing so much as to sit in a quiet room with a fifth of Jim Beam to calm their jangled nerves.
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SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and Glenn Graham,glenn.graham@baltsun.com | June 11, 2009
When the Golf Channel was looking for a golfer to mike up for its coverage of today's first round of the McDonald's LPGA Championship, Christina Kim seemed the ideal choice. The 25-year-old Korean-American had an impressive seventh-place finish at the Kraft Nabisco Championship, the season's first major. She's in fifth place in the U.S. Solheim Cup Team point standings. And, perhaps most important, the San Jose, Calif., native is plenty animated and was willing to participate. "All things combined, she's a natural," said Golf Channel producer Beth Hutter, who came up with the idea of having a player miked up during a round of golf.
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SPORTS
By John Steadman | November 27, 1991
Just because it hasn't been tried before is no reason for Carroll Pifer to back away from what he believes will be a smart business deal for all concerned. Good for himself, the resort he represents and those willing to avail themselves of the opportunity to play a round of golf for $25 and then be awarded a free night of lodging in a nearby motel.Pifer took an advertisement in The Sunday Sun, included his courtesy long-distance telephone number, and spelled out an unprecedented offer that has drawn overwhelming response even if the early reaction is one of anticipated doubt.
SPORTS
By David Whitley and David Whitley,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 11, 2005
Nobody could quite believe what they were seeing that day. Perhaps because almost nobody saw it. Jack Nicklaus swung at a golf ball, and it seemed to obey him. Not a bad trick for a 10-year-old. Jackie, as he was known back then, shot 51 on the first nine holes he ever played. Fifty-five years, 73 professional wins, 18 majors, one wife, five children, three body types, one hip replacement and millions of spectators later, Nicklaus' career is about to end in the perfect spot. St. Andrews, Scotland.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Runzheimer International, Rochester, Wis.Staff Writer | September 21, 1992
If you think a round of weekend golf at Pine Ridge is expensive, be thankful that you don't live in Tokyo or Beijing.Weekend duffers who have been digging deeper into their pockets to pay for a round may find it hard to believe, but golf is a bargain in the Baltimore area when compared to major cities around the world.In Japan, for example, you'd fork out $150.26 for 18 holes on a public course, including sharing a cart with a buddy.Japan has the world's most expensive public courses, according to a survey by Runzheimer International, a management consulting company based in Rochester, Wis.At the other end of the spectrum, the cost for 18 holes is only $7.06 in Czechoslovakia, where the few courses are linked to diplomatic offices and players are usually foreign visitors.
SPORTS
By Mel Derrick and Mel Derrick,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 3, 1991
MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. -- The question before the house today is:Who played baseball with Henry Aaron, led the American League in home runs twice, collects limited-edition prints that he frames himself, carves wooden duck decoys, is commuting 320 miles daily from Kiawah Island to play in the South Carolina Amateur golf tournament, has written a recipe book and cooks up a mess of chili that will fry your taste buds?The answer, of course, is Stormin' Gorman Thomas, a hail-fellow-well-met Charlestonian you'd enjoying sipping a lemonade with after a round of golf.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1996
BEACHWOOD, Ohio -- Bob Charles, one of the dominating players of the PGA Senior Tour for the past 11 years, turned in a record-smashing performance on the first day of the 17th annual U.S. Senior Open at historic Canterbury Golf Club yesterday.New Zealander Charles, rated by many the most successful left-hander in professional golf history with 46 titles worldwide, carved up the tree-lined, 6,765-yard course with a 6-under-par 34-32--66.The bogey-free tour left the rest of the field in his wake.
SPORTS
By George Taylor and George Taylor,Special to The Evening Sun | August 30, 1991
For those who wonder why golf's pace of play continues to get worse, Clyde Luther has some answers.As an expert on rules, Luther officiates at many major tournaments in Maryland and is assigned to most of the top championships staged by the U.S. Golf Association at sites throughout the country."
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | April 26, 1992
After the county police cruiser, the two limousines and the Secret Service van pulled up near the clubhouse at the Caves Valley Golf Club in Owings Mills yesterday morning, club member Theo Rodgers had to wonder aloud."
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | May 1, 1997
SINCE I HAD not achieved my weekly quota of aggravation and misery, I went out and played golf last Saturday.For me, it was a typically desultory round: balls howling in every direction, huge divots flying into the air and dropping back to earth like wounded partridge, a short game in which I displayed the gentle touch of a blacksmith around the greens.But, because of some awful malfunction in the damp recesses of my brain, I am addicted to this game.And as I hacked my way around the course the other day, I made the following observations:Golf is the hardest sport known to man. There are about 247 things you need to do correctly to execute a proper golf swing.
NEWS
January 9, 2005
THE WAY Joseph Weiner tells it, the year was 1998 and he figured he was playing his last round of golf - ever, and quite delightedly, thank you - having broken his driver and three-wood in anger during an earlier match. "I hated the game - hated it," he said. That might sound strange for a guy who has just opened a new business - in golf. But listen to his story. So this itchy, impatient fellow began this final round with friends at Hobbit's Glen in Columbia having to tee off with a 7-wood (which for you non-golfers is something of a geezer club that, on a good day, will permit a weak, scattershot hitter to send the ball maybe 180 yards or so out there, somewhere)
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 7, 2004
American interrogators in Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison spend grueling hours of "booth time" grilling detainees - some of them Syrian, Moroccan or Jordanian - for intelligence clues to help protect against escalating assaults on U.S. troops. Then, on occasion, they adjourn to the roof for a round of golf. "I got to take the rest of the day off after our long booth time," Joe Ryan, an ex-Green Beret now working in Iraq as an interrogator on an Army contract, wrote in an online Web log last month.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | March 11, 2002
FIVE WEEKS from now, a man named Chris Cain will step on a golf course at Penn State University and try to boldly go where no golfer has gone before. In an astounding display of masochism, Cain will attempt to enter the Guinness Book of Records for the most golf holes played in 12 hours using a cart. For the uninitiated, an average round of golf takes about four hours, after which most golfers want nothing so much as to sit in a quiet room with a fifth of Jim Beam to calm their jangled nerves.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1998
HAVRE DE GRACE -- It's a morning right off a Department of Tourism brochure. Opening before us, under a dazzling blue sky, is a perfectly manicured fairway ringed by tall trees and ivory-colored bunkers and, somewhere off in the distance is a green so smooth and pure they say it was carved in golf heaven.This is the first tee at Bulle Rock, the new world-class 18-hole course designed by the legendary Pete Dye on 275 lush acres hard by the Chesapeake Bay, in the northeast corner of Maryland.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1997
TROON, Scotland -- When the 22-foot putt went in for birdie on the 18th hole yesterday at Royal Troon, the small crowd sitting in the bleachers cheered loudly for the player who made it.It didn't matter that it gave the player a round of even-par 71 or that he stood at 5-over par after three rounds of the 126th British Open. The only thing that mattered was who made the birdie.Asked later why he seems to finish so many rounds with birdies, Jack Nicklaus said, "Maybe because I'm just happy to get there, I guess."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1997
BETHESDA -- Jeff Maggert doesn't want to hear about the final round of the PGA Championship at Bellerive in 1992. Or the handful of other regular PGA Tour events when he went back to his hotel, and in the case of two Houston Opens, his home, with the Saturday night lead and returned the next day without the trophy."
SPORTS
By Steven Kivinski and Steven Kivinski,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 25, 1995
It wasn't the best round of golf Jessica Fernandez has ever played, but her pivotal sand shot on the 17th hole of yesterday's final round of the Maryland High School Golf Championships was admittedly the best she'd ever hit.More importantly, it helped win her the tournament.Trailing by two strokes with two holes left to play at the University of Maryland GC, Fernandez found herself with a difficult lie in a bunker behind the 110-yard par 3.Instead of panicking, the 16-year-old senior delivered a shot that hit the flag stick and rolled eight feet away.
NEWS
By Brian Sullam LTC | February 9, 1997
IF OPPONENTS of Anne Arundel County's proposed revenue authority are to be believed, this quasi-public body could become a secretive organization that will severely damage the quality of life in the county.Even though a technicality has killed the bill that had been before the council, County Executive John Gary will reintroduce the measure, which means we will hear all the same arguments opponents offered the first time around.Run as a "shadow government," this authority would supposedly build casinos, bingo halls, bowling alleys, fitness centers, putt-putt golf courses, maybe even a strip joint or two in the name of recreation.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | May 1, 1997
SINCE I HAD not achieved my weekly quota of aggravation and misery, I went out and played golf last Saturday.For me, it was a typically desultory round: balls howling in every direction, huge divots flying into the air and dropping back to earth like wounded partridge, a short game in which I displayed the gentle touch of a blacksmith around the greens.But, because of some awful malfunction in the damp recesses of my brain, I am addicted to this game.And as I hacked my way around the course the other day, I made the following observations:Golf is the hardest sport known to man. There are about 247 things you need to do correctly to execute a proper golf swing.
NEWS
By Brian Sullam LTC | February 9, 1997
IF OPPONENTS of Anne Arundel County's proposed revenue authority are to be believed, this quasi-public body could become a secretive organization that will severely damage the quality of life in the county.Even though a technicality has killed the bill that had been before the council, County Executive John Gary will reintroduce the measure, which means we will hear all the same arguments opponents offered the first time around.Run as a "shadow government," this authority would supposedly build casinos, bingo halls, bowling alleys, fitness centers, putt-putt golf courses, maybe even a strip joint or two in the name of recreation.
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