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NEWS
January 10, 2010
A Northern District police officer shot at least one "aggressive" Rottweiler about 8:45 p.m. Saturday in the 4000 block of Greenmount Ave., according to Detective Nicole Monroe, a Baltimore police spokeswoman. The officer, whose name was not released, was taken to Mercy Hospital with minor injuries. No further details were available last night. - Tricia Bishop
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
Hazel Sanders and her Rottweiler service dog, Jurnee, are preparing to move into an apartment she can afford after the management company agreed to drop objections based on the Maryland Court of Appeals decision earlier this year defining pit bulls as inherently dangerous animals. Sanders reached agreement in mediation last week through the Howard County Office of Human Rights, where she had filed a complaint against Equity Management II for refusing to make an exception to its no-pets policy for a service dog, as federal law requires.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
Hazel Sanders and her Rottweiler service dog, Jurnee, are preparing to move into an apartment she can afford after the management company agreed to drop objections based on the Maryland Court of Appeals decision earlier this year defining pit bulls as inherently dangerous animals. Sanders reached agreement in mediation last week through the Howard County Office of Human Rights, where she had filed a complaint against Equity Management II for refusing to make an exception to its no-pets policy for a service dog, as federal law requires.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Hazel Sanders depends on her Rottweiler, Jurnee, to get her out walking, which she needs for a disabling knee condition, and to help her up if she falls. Two doctors have written letters saying the dog is an important part of her treatment, and she considers it as much a help as a seeing-eye dog is for a blind person. "It's not a pet; she's my legs," said Sanders, who is 70 and lives in Laurel. "I depend on the dog. ... She keeps me going. " Now, though, the 69-pound dog could stand between Sanders and a new home.
NEWS
February 20, 2002
A female Rottweiler found killed by a shotgun Friday in northeast Carroll County apparently was shot legally by a farmer protecting his livestock, according to Maryland State Police at Westminster. Bill and Marie Murphy of the 3900 block of Schalk Road No. 1 in Millers said their pet, Sabre, which had given birth to puppies 10 days before, was dead when they found her. The dog reportedly had attacked domestic rabbits and roosters at a nearby farm, said Lt. Terry L. Katz, the barracks commander, and state law justifies shooting loose dogs attacking livestock.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2002
Sabre, a female Rottweiler, was attacking a child's rabbit hutch when a Carroll County farmer shot and killed the dog, said authorities who had been trying to humanely trap the animal for about a month after receiving two complaints about her. "Within the past month, we had a rooster killed and four or five rabbits killed that belonged to little kids, and the description had come back that it was a Rottweiler wearing a purple collar, seen in the area...
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Hazel Sanders depends on her Rottweiler, Jurnee, to get her out walking, which she needs for a disabling knee condition, and to help her up if she falls. Two doctors have written letters saying the dog is an important part of her treatment, and she considers it as much a help as a seeing-eye dog is for a blind person. "It's not a pet; she's my legs," said Sanders, who is 70 and lives in Laurel. "I depend on the dog. ... She keeps me going. " Now, though, the 69-pound dog could stand between Sanders and a new home.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2001
A 3-year-old Rottweiler named Enigma will lose either his home or his life. His owner, Linda Wrobleski, said she will move. Enigma's latest victim, a 9-year-old golden retriever named Sam, rests at home, covered with nasty bites. So ends a week when residents of Century Street in Hampstead have felt terrorized by the specter of a vicious dog. Beverly Haugh said she and the 70-pound Sam were standing in their yard at 892 Century St. about 9:30 a.m. Aug. 10 when Enigma and a yellow Labrador approached.
NEWS
July 27, 1994
POLICE LOG* Laurel: About $1,100 in cash, a video camera and a videocassette recorder were stolen Sunday evening from a home in the 8300 block of Brockbridge Road, and two dogs -- a German shepherd and a Rottweiler -- were missing, county police said.
FEATURES
By Gina Spadafori and Gina Spadafori,McClatchy News Service | July 31, 1993
Caring about a particular breed of dog is a little bit like discovering a fabulous new restaurant: You want it to do well enough to stay in business, but not get so famous it's ruined by the popularity.With dog breeds as with restaurants, if the secret gets out it can be a disaster. People who aren't suited for the breed buy a puppy and have trouble with it, and people who don't know enough to be breeding the animals start churning out pups.Soon what attracted people to the breed disappears in a torrent of poor-quality animals with bad health and bad temperaments.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2012
The manager of a Waverly farmers' market said that following a dog-biting incident adjacent to the popular Saturday event, his security detail would issue civilian citations to the owners of animals left unattended. Marc Rey, who runs the 32nd Street Farmers Market, said that since a woman walking alongside the market in the 3200 block of Barclay Street was mauled Aug. 25 by a Rottweiler who broke from a leather leash attached to a parking meter, the owner of any unattended dog near the market could receive a ticket, or civil citation.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2012
Baltimore City police released the incident report Monday morning about the woman who was attacked by a Rottweiler outside the farmers' market in Waverly Saturday. The attack took place when the dog broke the leash with which it had been tied to a parking meter, witnesses said Sunday. The attack took place about 10:15 a.m. in the 3200 block of Barclay Street, which runs beside the popular 32nd Street Farmers Market, one of the city's largest. According to witnesses, a man tied his Rottweiler to a parking meter behind one of the vendor's trucks and entered the market, where dogs are not permitted.
NEWS
By Ruben Castaneda, The Washington Post | August 10, 2010
A Forest Heights woman disputed the official account of the incident in which her dog was shot to death Friday by Prince George's County sheriff's deputies who had gone to her home to serve an eviction notice. In a statement, the sheriff's department said that deputies knocked on the front and back doors of the home and made a commotion, but they received no response indicating that a dog was present. But Donya Williams, 38, said Monday that her 2 1/2-year-old Rottweiler, Kato, barked whenever anyone knocked on the door or walked by outside.
NEWS
January 10, 2010
A Northern District police officer shot at least one "aggressive" Rottweiler about 8:45 p.m. Saturday in the 4000 block of Greenmount Ave., according to Detective Nicole Monroe, a Baltimore police spokeswoman. The officer, whose name was not released, was taken to Mercy Hospital with minor injuries. No further details were available last night. - Tricia Bishop
NEWS
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,Sun Reporter | May 20, 2007
THE MYSTERY IS OVER -- ONE of them, anyway. I got the answer to the question everyone asks in a voice mail, informing me that my dog's DNA showed two primary breeds. The face (and tail) that launched a thousand guesses is -- largely -- Rottweiler and chow. Since adopting my dog Ace a year and a half ago, I'd heard dozens of possible combinations -- from the shelter where I got him, from veterinarians, from other dog owners -- but not that exact one. Now, my two-month-long quest to find the roots of my mutt was over -- with, appropriately enough, mixed results.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 12, 2004
The Rottweiler By Ruth Rendell. Crown publishing. 336 pages. $25. Ask any crime fiction aficionado for a list of the genre's best writers and chances are high that Ruth Rendell's name will appear near the top. The London-based psychological suspense author has been writing steadily for 40 years, beginning with 1964's A Doon with Death. The number of awards to her name would fill an entire living room and a large part of the next room over. I'd go on, but you get my drift: Rendell's considered to be one of the genre's greats, someone whose influence will be felt many years after her passing.
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