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NEWS
By From Staff Reports | July 6, 1995
Baltimore's police commissioner and the police chief of Rotterdam, the Netherlands' second-largest city, agreed yesterday to an officer-exchange program to help commanders battle the common problem of crime.Five Baltimore police officers, who have not yet been selected, will spend a month in Rotterdam studying community policing, violent crime and illegal drug distribution. Rotterdam officers who come to Baltimore will examine the same issues.Baltimore Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier, who returned from Rotterdam last month, said he selected the city because it shares characteristics with Baltimore and its chief is making fTC changes similar to his own. Rotterdam is a port city with a 5,000-member police force that is being decentralized with a strong commitment to the concept of community policing.
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SPORTS
By Jared Chado and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
Former University of Maryland field hockey players Megan Fraser and Lucy Godfrey will play for the United States in the FIH Masters World Cup in Rotterdam, Netherlands, which begins next week. It's the first time the U.S. has entered teams in the Masters tournament since 1998. The 52-year-old Godfrey, originally from Bel Air, will be the goalie for the United States' over-50 team. There are also tournaments for the 40+, 45+, 55+, and 60+ age groups. β€œIt's [been] a whirlwind,” said Godfrey, who now lives Stewartstown, Pa. β€œI still have to pinch myself.” Godfrey has tried to stay as involved with field hockey as possible since playing at Maryland from 1981-83, both working as an official and at one point coaching an Olympic developmental team.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1996
ROTTERDAM, The Netherlands -- The No. 4 tram reveals many faces of this sprawling port city near the North Sea as it passes the downtown office towers, rumbles west past brothels and heads into Marconiplein, infamous among police as the most dangerous area.While most foreign visitors wouldn't venture into Marconiplein, Baltimore Police Sgt. Wesley Ormrod can be found here, touring the rowhouse-lined streets with his Dutch counterparts and trying to learn ideas to cure the ills in his home city.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2004
The penthouse suite aboard the MS Rotterdam cruise ship brought plenty of words of admiration from a group of tourists yesterday with its private balcony, Jacuzzi bathtub with gold knobs, walk-in closet and its own dining and living room. "Now this is the place," said Tina Hein, a radio station manager from York, Pa. "Can you imagine how much money you'd have to pay to stay here?" Well, none -- for a few hours yesterday at least. Hein was among a few hundred guests who took a private afternoon tour of the Rotterdam, a Holland America ship, before it departed Seagirt Marine Terminal for a 10-day voyage to the southern Caribbean last evening.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2004
The penthouse suite aboard the MS Rotterdam cruise ship brought plenty of words of admiration from a group of tourists yesterday with its private balcony, Jacuzzi bathtub with gold knobs, walk-in closet and its own dining and living room. "Now this is the place," said Tina Hein, a radio station manager from York, Pa. "Can you imagine how much money you'd have to pay to stay here?" Well, none -- for a few hours yesterday at least. Hein was among a few hundred guests who took a private afternoon tour of the Rotterdam, a Holland America ship, before it departed Seagirt Marine Terminal for a 10-day voyage to the southern Caribbean last evening.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | August 13, 2001
Baltimore's rejuvenated Inner Harbor would be used as a model for redeveloping a section of Rotterdam's riverfront, if its leaders adopt a plan created for them by the Baltimore Development Corp. and four local design firms. Baltimore is one of four cities that were invited this year to suggest ways to rebuild an area known as De Boompjes, which means "the trees," on the River Maas. It was the only American city asked to participate; the others are London, Hamburg and Barcelona. Baltimore enjoys a "Sister City" relationship with Rotterdam, but it was contacted because of the city's successful efforts to reclaim its waterfront over the past three decades.
NEWS
By John Miller and John Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 9, 1999
ROTTERDAM -- Bill Arce is smiling. Six thousand Dutch baseball fans are on their feet, as Holland's ace, Orlando Stewart, enters the game to protect a 3-2 advantage against Cuba.It is the rubber game of the Gold Medal Series of the annual World Port Tournament."This is just like America, isn't it?" he says. As director of International Sports Group, Arce, 73, has spent much of his life promoting baseball overseas. Big events like this one are his reason for living.Stewart retires the side in order, and the crowd roars.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2000
Robbie Menrad is 12, lives in Pasadena and speaks no Dutch. Tom van der Reep is 10, from the Netherlands and speaks no English. At first blush, the two boys have little to build a friendship on, since they barely can communicate with each other. But from the time that Tom arrived in Maryland on Saturday to stay with Robbie for a weeklong Baltimore-Rotterdam Sister Cities boys choir exchange program, they've closely bonded over two things they hold in common - playing Nintendo and trading Pokemon cards.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1996
It was a simple drug arrest similar to hundreds of others made each week in Baltimore. The manager of a Roy Rogers found a man shooting up heroin in the bathroom. He called the police, who took the man to jail.The bust netted police three vials of crack cocaine and an empty heroin syringe and took Officer Bryan K. Hake off the street for more than two hours to book the prisoner.For Arie Weeda, a visiting police officer from the Netherlands -- where police and citizens are more tolerant of drug use -- the bust seemed a bit unnecessary.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1996
ROTTERDAM, the Netherlands - For Peter Jenssen, buying cocaine is as simple as going to church.Nearly every day the 40-year-old addict joins hundreds of long-time users in the basement of Paulist Church, where the pastor allows drug dealers to peddle their wares just one block from the downtown Holiday Inn.The Dutch tolerance of drugs has been an eye-opener for two Baltimore police officers, David Childs and Sgt. Wesley Ormrod, who are visiting for a...
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 10, 2002
ROTTERDAM, Netherlands -It's enough to make even hardened sea dogs think twice: a 9,000-volt electric fence to zap pirates and other intruders as they try to board ships. A suspected terrorist attack on a French oil tanker in Yemen having raised safety concerns on the high seas, Rotterdam-based Secure-Marine says its new device can ward off modern-day buccaneers, who often arrive at night aboard motorboats and scale vessels by rope. Beefing up onboard security might persuade insurers to lower premiums for ships headed to places such as Indonesia.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | August 13, 2001
Baltimore's rejuvenated Inner Harbor would be used as a model for redeveloping a section of Rotterdam's riverfront, if its leaders adopt a plan created for them by the Baltimore Development Corp. and four local design firms. Baltimore is one of four cities that were invited this year to suggest ways to rebuild an area known as De Boompjes, which means "the trees," on the River Maas. It was the only American city asked to participate; the others are London, Hamburg and Barcelona. Baltimore enjoys a "Sister City" relationship with Rotterdam, but it was contacted because of the city's successful efforts to reclaim its waterfront over the past three decades.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2000
Robbie Menrad is 12, lives in Pasadena and speaks no Dutch. Tom van der Reep is 10, from the Netherlands and speaks no English. At first blush, the two boys have little to build a friendship on, since they barely can communicate with each other. But from the time that Tom arrived in Maryland on Saturday to stay with Robbie for a weeklong Baltimore-Rotterdam Sister Cities boys choir exchange program, they've closely bonded over two things they hold in common - playing Nintendo and trading Pokemon cards.
NEWS
By John Miller and John Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 9, 1999
ROTTERDAM -- Bill Arce is smiling. Six thousand Dutch baseball fans are on their feet, as Holland's ace, Orlando Stewart, enters the game to protect a 3-2 advantage against Cuba.It is the rubber game of the Gold Medal Series of the annual World Port Tournament."This is just like America, isn't it?" he says. As director of International Sports Group, Arce, 73, has spent much of his life promoting baseball overseas. Big events like this one are his reason for living.Stewart retires the side in order, and the crowd roars.
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | September 15, 1997
MIAMI -- Why have Miami voters turned down, by a margin of better than 5-to-1, the proposal to dissolve their city and merge it with the other unincorporated areas of Dade County?If there was ever a case for abolition, this was it. Instead of celebrating its 100th birthday last year as a distinguished capital of the Americas, Miami was awash in a tawdry array of official scandals. Its operating budget deficit was so huge that the state of Florida imposed a financial-oversight commission.As this month's vote on abolition neared, present or former city officials ranging from a city manager to a port director to a city commissioner were in deep legal trouble.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1996
It was a simple drug arrest similar to hundreds of others made each week in Baltimore. The manager of a Roy Rogers found a man shooting up heroin in the bathroom. He called the police, who took the man to jail.The bust netted police three vials of crack cocaine and an empty heroin syringe and took Officer Bryan K. Hake off the street for more than two hours to book the prisoner.For Arie Weeda, a visiting police officer from the Netherlands -- where police and citizens are more tolerant of drug use -- the bust seemed a bit unnecessary.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 10, 2002
ROTTERDAM, Netherlands -It's enough to make even hardened sea dogs think twice: a 9,000-volt electric fence to zap pirates and other intruders as they try to board ships. A suspected terrorist attack on a French oil tanker in Yemen having raised safety concerns on the high seas, Rotterdam-based Secure-Marine says its new device can ward off modern-day buccaneers, who often arrive at night aboard motorboats and scale vessels by rope. Beefing up onboard security might persuade insurers to lower premiums for ships headed to places such as Indonesia.
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | September 15, 1997
MIAMI -- Why have Miami voters turned down, by a margin of better than 5-to-1, the proposal to dissolve their city and merge it with the other unincorporated areas of Dade County?If there was ever a case for abolition, this was it. Instead of celebrating its 100th birthday last year as a distinguished capital of the Americas, Miami was awash in a tawdry array of official scandals. Its operating budget deficit was so huge that the state of Florida imposed a financial-oversight commission.As this month's vote on abolition neared, present or former city officials ranging from a city manager to a port director to a city commissioner were in deep legal trouble.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | March 24, 1996
First, Baltimore prosecutors doubled the amount of heroin and cocaine it takes to be charged with drug distribution. Then the police commissioner ordered his officers to go after gun-toting criminals rather than street addicts holding small amounts of drugs.Now, two city police officers have just returned from a fact finding trip to the Netherlands, where they observed customers smoking marijuana in "coffee houses" and officers have wide latitude in making drug arrests.About a decade has passed since Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke called drug abuse a medical issue and called for a national debate on drug decriminalization.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1996
ROTTERDAM, the Netherlands - For Peter Jenssen, buying cocaine is as simple as going to church.Nearly every day the 40-year-old addict joins hundreds of long-time users in the basement of Paulist Church, where the pastor allows drug dealers to peddle their wares just one block from the downtown Holiday Inn.The Dutch tolerance of drugs has been an eye-opener for two Baltimore police officers, David Childs and Sgt. Wesley Ormrod, who are visiting for a...
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