Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRotisserie
IN THE NEWS

Rotisserie

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Tom Keegan and Tom Keegan,Sun Staff Writer | April 13, 1994
Mention the name Lee Smith to a Rotisserie League baseball player and watch visions of dollar signs illuminate his face. For most of his 14-plus major-league seasons, Smith has been a ninth-inning fixture, an intimidating, 6-foot-6 presence on the mound.Whether blowing hitters away with a 95 mph fastball as in younger days, or mixing pitches with precise control as the past couple of years, Smith consistently has ranked among the league leaders in saves.Baseball's all-time saves leader has earned a lot of money for people wise enough to call his name in Rotisserie drafts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
It didn't move far — just one block up Eastern Avenue — but the new Ikaros is a world apart from the original, which the Kohilas brothers opened in 1969. Sometimes bigger is better. The new Ikaros, which opened last summer, has things the old one didn't, like a banquet facility on the building's second floor and a dedicated bar space, separated from the main dining room by a wall partition. The bar seems like a nice place to wait for a table, but when we visited, most guests kept close to the hostess stand instead, which seemed a bit overwhelmed.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | March 1, 1991
The easy, and ethical, thing to do on the subject of Rotisserie leagues is to make sport of them and particularly those who participate in them.Certainly, that was always my stance. Until now.Until now, I preferred, in my own judicious manner, to think of the Roto-boys (and girls) as soulless technocrats with their noses stuck inside Baseball America who not only didn't have to attend a game but never even had to watch one. Isn't this basically baseball by slide rule?What bothered me most about Rotisserians, as they like to call themselves, is that they tend to speak in decimal points and think it's possible, and even likely, to find an epiphany in a box score (look under "eph")
NEWS
By Joyce White and Joyce White,Tribune Media Services | January 2, 2008
A rack of bronzed chickens revolving in a head-high rotisserie near the entrance door to the shop on rue de Bretagne in the Marais section of Paris halted my steps. It was late morning on a Sunday and I had just arrived in the City of Light, hungry and a little excited. In moments, the inviting aroma set in, and I looked up and saw the sign on the front of the shop, which read: "Jean Marc Stevenot: Maitre Volailler," or certified poultry expert. I took my place in the queue outside, brushing shoulders with chic Parisians carrying the makings of Sunday dinner at home: baguettes of breads, aromatic cheese, fragrant tarts and cakes, a bottle or two of wine in hand.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | July 12, 1992
Chicken with a concept"It's a very new concept," says Jonathan Soudry of his fledgling Pikesville restaurant Poulet. "It's so new it doesn't exist anywhere else in the world. The idea was to create a restaurant environment and give people restaurant food, but with the convenience and prices of fast food."The decor, by Rita St. Clair Associates, seeks to capture the feeling of Mr. Soudry's native Provence, with tile floors, tile designs on the walls, copper cookware hanging as art, with wooden tables and green-painted wood chairs.
FEATURES
By Sylvia H. Badger | September 5, 1992
Boston Chicken822 Dulaney Valley Road, Dulaney Plaza, Towson.Hours: Open daily from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.(410) 825-2222; fax: (410) 825-2242Boston Chicken opened its doors about six weeks ago, and people are coming from all over to pick up the restaurant's marinated rotisserie chicken.When you walk into the sparkling eatery, you see and smell dozens of marinated chickens cooking on two large, upright, brick-fired rotisseries. Glass cases display the trimmings, cooked fresh daily -- vegetables, salads, soups, desserts and chicken pot pies.
FEATURES
By CHILDS WALKER and CHILDS WALKER,SUN REPORTER | March 4, 2006
I ATTENDED BASEBALL camp at Gettysburg College when I was still in elementary school. One rainy afternoon, we were trapped inside and a coach asked if anybody knew which Hall-of-Famer had come from Gettysburg. I shot my hand up and blurted "Eddie Plank." The man looked at me like I was an alien. He had meant the question rhetorically, I suppose. "Yeah, he won 326 games for the old Philadelphia Athletics," I added helpfully. Another stunned look from coach. Little did I know, but in that exchange and many others like it, I was revealing myself as a baseball "geek" - a kid so obsessed with baseball and its statistics that I would look for any possible way to connect with the game.
NEWS
By Joyce White and Joyce White,Tribune Media Services | January 2, 2008
A rack of bronzed chickens revolving in a head-high rotisserie near the entrance door to the shop on rue de Bretagne in the Marais section of Paris halted my steps. It was late morning on a Sunday and I had just arrived in the City of Light, hungry and a little excited. In moments, the inviting aroma set in, and I looked up and saw the sign on the front of the shop, which read: "Jean Marc Stevenot: Maitre Volailler," or certified poultry expert. I took my place in the queue outside, brushing shoulders with chic Parisians carrying the makings of Sunday dinner at home: baguettes of breads, aromatic cheese, fragrant tarts and cakes, a bottle or two of wine in hand.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | December 5, 1998
Will Clark, that's a good one. Didn't Orioles owner Peter Angelos reject Clark in favor of Rafael Palmeiro in 1993? Yes, but that was three managers and two general managers ago."Geez, that guy!" Angelos said of Clark in a 1996 interview with Sports Illustrated. "I've looked at medicals for 30 years as a lawyer. That guy had the injuries of an infantryman!"Clark, now 34, should be about ready to qualify for a Purple Heart, but the Orioles want to enlist him in their latest Rotisserie -- War. As general manager Frank Wren said yesterday, "He's probably the top guy at first base right now."
NEWS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK | April 3, 1993
I knew my life had changed when Sandy Alomar arrived at spring training with a stiff back and I wasn't worried.Sandy Alomar is a catcher for the Cleveland Indians, who had a wonderful rookie season, then missed much of the last two seasons with a series of injuries.[From the Associated Press report: Alomar's latest ailment is a strained lower back, the result of his marathon, straight-through drive from Cleveland to Winter Haven for last week's start of spring training. He says it's a minor problem, and the Indians' doctors have shut him down for a week or so only as a precaution.
FEATURES
By CHILDS WALKER and CHILDS WALKER,SUN REPORTER | March 4, 2006
I ATTENDED BASEBALL camp at Gettysburg College when I was still in elementary school. One rainy afternoon, we were trapped inside and a coach asked if anybody knew which Hall-of-Famer had come from Gettysburg. I shot my hand up and blurted "Eddie Plank." The man looked at me like I was an alien. He had meant the question rhetorically, I suppose. "Yeah, he won 326 games for the old Philadelphia Athletics," I added helpfully. Another stunned look from coach. Little did I know, but in that exchange and many others like it, I was revealing myself as a baseball "geek" - a kid so obsessed with baseball and its statistics that I would look for any possible way to connect with the game.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 26, 2005
The sign in the window of Pollo a la Brasa, the tiny new Peruvian chicken restaurant in Fells Point, said it was closed. But we could see people inside, so we forged ahead. Turned out, the sign was wrong. Pollo a la Brasa had been open since December, and it was definitely serving lunch on a recent windy spring day. Paula and Bill Reidy, who own the building, opened the restaurant with Victor Quajino, a longtime friend who hails from El Salvador. Quajino suggested that the area was in need of a real Peruvian chicken restaurant, explained Paula Reidy.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2003
Dinnertime was fast approaching and the refrigerator was empty. Not empty in a "Gee, honey, we have no more Yoo-hoo and we're almost out of herbed brie" kind of way. But empty in the "There's nothing to eat unless you want a strawberry Go-Gurt that expired in 2002 with a hoisin-sauce chaser" kind of empty. At any moment the wolves would be howling at the kitchen door, expecting some kind of evening sustenance. Pizza was out - we had that last night. Omelets and pancakes were, too - we were out of eggs.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | December 5, 1998
Will Clark, that's a good one. Didn't Orioles owner Peter Angelos reject Clark in favor of Rafael Palmeiro in 1993? Yes, but that was three managers and two general managers ago."Geez, that guy!" Angelos said of Clark in a 1996 interview with Sports Illustrated. "I've looked at medicals for 30 years as a lawyer. That guy had the injuries of an infantryman!"Clark, now 34, should be about ready to qualify for a Purple Heart, but the Orioles want to enlist him in their latest Rotisserie -- War. As general manager Frank Wren said yesterday, "He's probably the top guy at first base right now."
SPORTS
By Tom Keegan and Tom Keegan,Sun Staff Writer | April 13, 1994
Mention the name Lee Smith to a Rotisserie League baseball player and watch visions of dollar signs illuminate his face. For most of his 14-plus major-league seasons, Smith has been a ninth-inning fixture, an intimidating, 6-foot-6 presence on the mound.Whether blowing hitters away with a 95 mph fastball as in younger days, or mixing pitches with precise control as the past couple of years, Smith consistently has ranked among the league leaders in saves.Baseball's all-time saves leader has earned a lot of money for people wise enough to call his name in Rotisserie drafts.
NEWS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK | April 3, 1993
I knew my life had changed when Sandy Alomar arrived at spring training with a stiff back and I wasn't worried.Sandy Alomar is a catcher for the Cleveland Indians, who had a wonderful rookie season, then missed much of the last two seasons with a series of injuries.[From the Associated Press report: Alomar's latest ailment is a strained lower back, the result of his marathon, straight-through drive from Cleveland to Winter Haven for last week's start of spring training. He says it's a minor problem, and the Indians' doctors have shut him down for a week or so only as a precaution.
SPORTS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | February 21, 1992
While major-league pitchers are just limbering up for spring training, the legal fastballs are already flying in the competitive business of "Rotisserie league" baseball statistics.Baltimore-based USA Stats Inc. fired a strike yesterday when it won an injunction in U.S. District Court in Baltimore that temporarily stops a New York competitor from marketing its Rotisserie stat service.U.S. District Judge William N. Nickerson issued the restraining order yesterday against Rotisserie League Baseball Association Inc., which the Baltimore company says stole its marketing ideas by duplicating its sales literature.
SPORTS
By Steve Marcus and Steve Marcus,Newsday | July 14, 1991
Baseball has indeed expanded beyond the American and National League to the Fantasy League. The stadium of the mind is embodied in the burgeoning Rotisserie League, where every fan can run his own team. Organized 11 years ago by a small group of fans and writers, an estimated 2 million persons are playing in this field of schemes. The reality is that fantasy baseball has become big time, with a national expenditure of an estimated $50 million to buy teams and millions more on statistical services to keep fans up to date.
FEATURES
By Sylvia H. Badger | September 5, 1992
Boston Chicken822 Dulaney Valley Road, Dulaney Plaza, Towson.Hours: Open daily from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.(410) 825-2222; fax: (410) 825-2242Boston Chicken opened its doors about six weeks ago, and people are coming from all over to pick up the restaurant's marinated rotisserie chicken.When you walk into the sparkling eatery, you see and smell dozens of marinated chickens cooking on two large, upright, brick-fired rotisseries. Glass cases display the trimmings, cooked fresh daily -- vegetables, salads, soups, desserts and chicken pot pies.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | July 12, 1992
Chicken with a concept"It's a very new concept," says Jonathan Soudry of his fledgling Pikesville restaurant Poulet. "It's so new it doesn't exist anywhere else in the world. The idea was to create a restaurant environment and give people restaurant food, but with the convenience and prices of fast food."The decor, by Rita St. Clair Associates, seeks to capture the feeling of Mr. Soudry's native Provence, with tile floors, tile designs on the walls, copper cookware hanging as art, with wooden tables and green-painted wood chairs.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.