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NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell, Jim Haner and Kimberly A.C. Wilson and John B. O'Donnell, Jim Haner and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2002
During a long-ago April in which a young Edward T. Norris marked his first birthday, Officer Stephen B. Tabeling was summoned to police headquarters to hear praise of his fine work. Now, 41 years after Police Commissioner James M. Hepbron congratulated the young patrolman, Norris is the commissioner and Tabeling is helping him lift the Police Department out of a funk that recently found the homicide squad unable to solve six out of every 10 murders. Tabeling retired in 1979 after a distinguished quarter-century career that included five years as a lieutenant in homicide.
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NEWS
February 14, 1999
THE CONTRAST is astonishing. Last year, Boston (population 558,000) recorded 35 homicides; Baltimore (population 675,000) had 314. Even New York, with 10 times more people, had just 629 homicides.These numbers tell a powerful story. Starting nine years ago with record homicide rates of 152 and 2,245, respectively, Boston and New York began reversing the tide.Surely Baltimore, too, should be able to curb the lethal bloodshed on its streets.Yet the prospect is not promising. The year has started with another wave of killings.
NEWS
By Michael James and Peter Hermann | October 2, 1994
In January, Thomas C. Frazier took over the 2,900-member Baltimore Police Department, an agency dogged by brutality complaints, petty corruption, and internal strife fueled by racial friction.The city was reeling from its second-straight record-setting year for homicides.Some 353 people were slain in Baltimore in 1993 -- up from 335 the year before -- as drug dealers brazenly took over neighborhoods and police morale plummeted under Commissioner Edward V. Woods.Frustrated by the carnage, politicians and community leaders turned up the heat on Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and Mr. Woods.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1995
What the three Republican candidates for mayor lack in money, lawn signs and supporters, they make up in gumption.In a city where registered Democrats outnumber Republicans 9-to-1, where a Republican hasn't been mayor in nearly three decades, Victor Clark Jr., S. Scott McCown and Arthur W. Cuffie Jr. are almost absurdly upbeat about their candidacies. Each says he has the answer to the city's ills and can run government better than Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and his opponent, City Council President Mary Pat Clarke.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | March 26, 2012
BRADENTON, Fla. - The Orioles roster thinned out a little Monday, with several players being sent out of camp including right-hander Brad Bergesen, who pitched in 34 games with the Orioles last year. The Orioles have not yet announced the cuts, but they also include infielder Steve Tolleson, outfielder Scott Beerer and catcher John Hester - all non-roster invitees - who were sent to minor-league camp. Bergesen was optioned to Triple-A Norfolk to be a starter. Also optioned to Triple-A Norfolk were pitcher Jason Berken, who made his spring debut Sunday after dealing with a hamstring issue, and Matt Antonelli, who batted .194 in 31 at-bats this spring.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2000
A confidential study of the Baltimore Police Department's homicide unit, whose detectives make arrests in less than half the city's slayings, blames the failings on poor supervision and antipathy between detectives and prosecutors. The stinging analysis lists a variety of internal problems that include rotating out experienced investigators, substandard equipment and inadequate staffing of crucial support personnel, such as laboratory technicians and clerks. From broken tape recorders to case folders that are in "abysmal condition -- that is, when they can be located," the report portrays a dysfunctional unit whose detectives are responsible for investigating the most serious of offenses.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | February 12, 1995
It is midmorning, and Baltimore's police chief is at his desk, scanning a list of items seized in drug raids. He's looking for a lawn mower. And a grill.A scavenger hunt may not fit the image of Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier and his tough stance on violent crime, but for this self-described "social worker with a gun," it's exactly the image he wants to project.Obtaining items for the force's youth choir or a neighborhood cleanup, he says, is crucial to the mission of making Baltimore safer.
NEWS
By JENNIFER MCMENAMIN and JENNIFER MCMENAMIN,SUN REPORTER | January 17, 2006
Responding to allegations of corruption in a district station house, Baltimore's police commissioner said yesterday that he is committed to restoring the "internal integrity" of the department and has begun implementing safeguards aimed at keeping officers honest. Commissioner Leonard D. Hamm, speaking publicly for the first time about the arrest and suspension of several officers from the "flex squad" in the city's Southwestern District, said he has reinstated procedures that were in use when he left the Police Department in 1996 but were later eliminated.
NEWS
By Richard H.P. Sia and Richard H.P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 12, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. military buildup in the Persian Gulf, already well in excess of 100,000 personnel, will continue indefinitely and may lead to a larger, more permanent commitment of American forces to the region than first anticipated, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney said yesterday.Mr. Cheney, testifying on Capitol Hill for the first time since U.S. forces began moving to the region Aug. 7, said the added cost of Operation Desert Shield would be about $15 billion for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1 -- more than $1 billion a month if the crisis continues for the entire year.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | August 10, 1994
In a move to ease tensions between the black and Jewish communities, Baltimore's police commissioner yesterday postponed a plan to transfer the commander of the Northwestern District, who is black, and to replace him with a new commander who is Jewish.Commissioner Thomas Frazier announced his decision to postpone the transfer of Maj. Barry Powell after a two-hour meeting with a delegation from the city's black community.Last week, Mr. Frazier said Major Powell would be reassigned to head the property division and would be replaced by Lt. Jeff Rosen, a shift commander in the Southeastern District.
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