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Rotation Policy

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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Jim Haner and Peter Hermann and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1999
Baltimore police abolished a much-criticized six-year policy of rotating officers through different assignments, saying yesterday that it crippled the department's effort to investigate homicides and bring killers to justice.Top department commanders said the "rotation" policy was directly responsible for a plummeting homicide arrest rate, which dropped from 70 percent five years ago to below 40 percent today, and an exodus of experienced detectives.The change is one of a series of moves announced yesterday, some of which are linked to Sunday's mass killings of five women in a rowhouse.
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NEWS
December 10, 1999
MAYOR Martin O'Malley has started dismantling former Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier's reforms. The first to go -- to the jubilation of the police union and rank-and-file -- is the controversial personnel rotation policy.Transferring officers regularly in and out of specialized units was among Mr. Frazier's attempts to weaken the police union and give minorities and women opportunities for advancement. But that policy ended up wrecking the homicide unit. Rather than go back to less prestigious patrol assignments, many seasoned homicide detectives resigned -- and found high demand for their expertise in suburban police departments.
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NEWS
December 10, 1999
MAYOR Martin O'Malley has started dismantling former Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier's reforms. The first to go -- to the jubilation of the police union and rank-and-file -- is the controversial personnel rotation policy.Transferring officers regularly in and out of specialized units was among Mr. Frazier's attempts to weaken the police union and give minorities and women opportunities for advancement. But that policy ended up wrecking the homicide unit. Rather than go back to less prestigious patrol assignments, many seasoned homicide detectives resigned -- and found high demand for their expertise in suburban police departments.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Jim Haner and Peter Hermann and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1999
Baltimore police abolished a much-criticized six-year policy of rotating officers through different assignments, saying yesterday that it crippled the department's effort to investigate homicides and bring killers to justice.Top department commanders said the "rotation" policy was directly responsible for a plummeting homicide arrest rate, which dropped from 70 percent five years ago to below 40 percent today, and an exodus of experienced detectives.The change is one of a series of moves announced yesterday, some of which are linked to Sunday's mass killings of five women in a rowhouse.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 25, 1997
Baltimore Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier's decision to choose the officers he wants to rotate through various jobs is not unfair to labor, a hearing commissioner has ruled.A federal hearing examiner, Jerome H. Ross, decided in a 10-page ruling that an agreement signed by department and union officials clearly gives Frazier the "authority to specify assignments."The union was upset that Frazier made exceptions to his policy of rotating every officer to a new assignment every four years.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1998
Troubled by Baltimore's homicide rate, City Council members are calling for an end to a controversial police department policy of rotating veteran homicide detectives into other jobs.In a resolution passed during last night's meeting, the council said it "demands that the [Mayor Kurt L.] Schmoke administration halt its policy."The resolution's sponsor, Councilman Martin O'Malley, called the policy "foolish" because officers with minimal homicide investigative experience would be responsible for solving some of the city's toughest crimes.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | July 28, 1994
Members of the Baltimore police union unanimously rejected last night a city contract proposal that would have given them a 2 1/4 percent pay raise and formally implemented a controversial "rotation policy," both bitter points of contention with union leaders.At the urging of their union bosses, officers voted down the proposal by a resounding 1,477-38. The turnout was the union's largest ever for a contract vote, said Lt. Leander S. Nevin, president of Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 3."
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | August 12, 1994
Prompted by what he sees as a flawed policy of rotating veteran officers in and out of top investigative units, a vaunted former Baltimore homicide detective, Gary Childs, joined the Carroll County state's attorney's office yesterday as a child abuse investigator."
NEWS
February 14, 1998
FOUR YEARS AGO this month, the City Council approved Thomas C. Frazier as police commissioner. Since then, he has produced solid results -- bringing down the crime rate, reorganizing the department, strengthening ties to the community. His predecessor, Edward V. Woods, had brought the department to the depths of despair, with high crime rates and low morale. The problems didn't end when Mr. Frazierarrived.Mr. Frazier was an outsider, the first commissioner in 30 years who hadn't risen through the ranks.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | April 5, 1994
Capt. Howard F. Parrott, a 37-year Baltimore police veteran, took over yesterday as commander of the city homicide unit and said he hopes to bolster morale and to improve office conditions for the detectives.The 59-year-old former head of the vice and fugitive squads said he spent much of his first day familiarizing himself with the 48-member unit -- and its problems."There's no doubt there's some disappointment up here due to the new rotation policy. Some of the guys feel like they're getting shafted.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Jim Haner and Peter Hermann and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1999
Baltimore police abolished a much-criticized six-year policy of rotating officers through different assignments, saying yesterday that it crippled the department's effort to investigate homicides and bring killers to justice.Top department commanders said the "rotation" policy was directly responsible for a plummeting homicide arrest rate, which dropped from 70 percent five years ago to below 40 percent today, and an exodus of experienced detectives.The change is one of a series of moves announced yesterday, some of which are linked to Sunday's mass killings of five women in a rowhouse.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | November 6, 1998
This weekend I'll do what Judith Wagner has been after me to do. I'll put a blue light in the front window. I'll open one of the Christmas boxes and get an electric candle, screw in a blue bulb and set the whole thing in a place where it can be seen from the street. A modest gesture in support of the police among us. Two have died in accidents in Baltimore during the past week - Harold Carey and Barry Wood - and we need a way of paying respects. The blue light is a simple idea, which is why I like it. Judith Wagner suggested it. She lives in Essex, Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1998
Troubled by Baltimore's homicide rate, City Council members are calling for an end to a controversial police department policy of rotating veteran homicide detectives into other jobs.In a resolution passed during last night's meeting, the council said it "demands that the [Mayor Kurt L.] Schmoke administration halt its policy."The resolution's sponsor, Councilman Martin O'Malley, called the policy "foolish" because officers with minimal homicide investigative experience would be responsible for solving some of the city's toughest crimes.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Eric Siegel and Jamie Stiehm and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1998
The Baltimore Police Department's controversial policy of rotating officers into different jobs is finally coming around to the high-profile homicide unit, with about a quarter of the 48 detectives scheduled to be transferred by the end of the year, officials said yesterday.The transfers come as the unit is solving fewer murders than in the past and as the city is experiencing a sudden escalation in homicides after a period of decline.The 10 to 15 detectives scheduled to be moved include some of the department's most senior members, who most likely will be reassigned to uniformed patrol in one of the city's nine police districts, officials said.
NEWS
February 14, 1998
FOUR YEARS AGO this month, the City Council approved Thomas C. Frazier as police commissioner. Since then, he has produced solid results -- bringing down the crime rate, reorganizing the department, strengthening ties to the community. His predecessor, Edward V. Woods, had brought the department to the depths of despair, with high crime rates and low morale. The problems didn't end when Mr. Frazierarrived.Mr. Frazier was an outsider, the first commissioner in 30 years who hadn't risen through the ranks.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 25, 1997
Baltimore Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier's decision to choose the officers he wants to rotate through various jobs is not unfair to labor, a hearing commissioner has ruled.A federal hearing examiner, Jerome H. Ross, decided in a 10-page ruling that an agreement signed by department and union officials clearly gives Frazier the "authority to specify assignments."The union was upset that Frazier made exceptions to his policy of rotating every officer to a new assignment every four years.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Michael James and Jim Haner and Michael James,Sun Staff Writers | March 1, 1994
Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier addressed rank-and-file officers for the first time last night -- giving them a dose of tough talk that drew nothing but cheers."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Jim Haner and Peter Hermann and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1999
Baltimore police abolished a much-criticized six-year policy of rotating officers through different assignments, saying yesterday that it crippled the department's effort to investigate homicides and bring killers to justice.Top department commanders said the "rotation" policy was directly responsible for a plummeting homicide arrest rate, which dropped from 70 percent five years ago to below 40 percent today, and an exodus of experienced detectives.The change is one of a series of moves announced yesterday, some of which are linked to Sunday's mass killings of five women in a rowhouse.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Jason LaCanfora and Peter Hermann and Jason LaCanfora,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1997
The union representing Baltimore police officers is calling for the immediate ouster of Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier, charging that he has failed to put forth a clear strategy to fight violent crime.Coming on the eve of the police chief's third anniversary, the vote by the 3,000-member union marks the first time it has demanded a commissioner's resignation since the labor organization was founded three decades ago.Eighty-seven percent of the 1,400 members who responded to a one-question survey sent by mail in November demanded Frazier's removal, leaders of the Fraternal Order of Police said yesterday.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 12, 1994
Will the policy of Baltimore's new police commissioner to have officers change posts every few years, regardless of performance, lead to an exodus of experienced cops?Here's a partial answer: Gary Childs is gone. Yesterday was his first day on the job as an investigator for the Carroll County state's attorney.For the last several years, he had been one of the city's top detectives, solving dozens of murders and logging amazing numbers of hours chasing good and bad leads on countless cases.
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