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By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2011
Workers repairing the 1854 sloop of war Constellation have uncovered significant rot in the ship's hull. The damage, attributed to rainwater seeping into the hull from the gun ports, is expected to lengthen the ship's time in dry dock at the Sparrows Point Shipyard by 10 to 14 days and add about $70,000 to the $500,000 repair bill. The water intrusion has been stopped, and some of the rotted wood has been cut out and replaced. But Chris Rowsom, executive director of Historic Ships in Baltimore, said the Constellation will need more extensive repairs in two to three years that could take it away from the Inner Harbor for up to six months.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
The Constellation will be moved from its location in Baltimore's Inner Harbor for four months this winter to undergo more than $2 million in repairs - including $750,000 to fix rotting in its hull. The city Board of Estimates, which oversees spending in Baltimore, voted to approve the $750,000 expenditure for the ship, which has been docked in the harbor for almost 60 years. Money for the repairs comes from general obligation bonds approved by city voters in 2012. The ship will be dry-docked at the U.S. Coast Guard Yard in Curtis Bay from Oct. 20 to Feb. 20 for the repairs, said Christopher Rowsom, director of Historic Ships in Baltimore.
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FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 19, 2006
Our Early Girl tomatoes look fine, but when we cut into the fruit, one or more cavities is black. This is an unusual manifestation of blossom end rot. The cause is insufficient calcium taken up by the plant, usually due to insufficient or inconsistent watering. This is usually an early-season malady that goes away as the season progresses. Make sure your plants are well watered and, for a quick fix, use a calcium chloride spray product. Next spring, put a handful of lime or gypsum in the planting hole.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Every time baby squash in my garden starts to grow, it dies. I hose down the garden every day, but it still gets fuzzy and dries up. How can I stop this? Most vegetables don't like wet foliage. Choanephora wet rot is a fungus encouraged by warm, rainy days with overcast, humid conditions. Overhead watering, watering too often, and plants crowding so they don't get good air circulation all contribute to choanephora. The fuzzy black or brown fungal growth occurs in squash and pumpkin blossoms, causing them to abort, or causing them to wither at the connection of the blossoms to the young fruit.
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 2006
Every year I have the same squash problem: Their crookneck yellows and the flower end rots off. I water once every two days. Choanephora rot is a very common fungal disease (mostly of squash but pumpkins, eggplant and chili peppers are also susceptible). It first appears on dying blossoms still attached to fruits. The disease then spreads to the fruit. (Sometimes it first appears at the stem end.) Affected fruit parts turn dark brown to black, very fuzzy and mushy. The pathogen likes warm, humid and rainy conditions.
SPORTS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | July 20, 1992
TEL AVIV, Israel -- Esther Rot's dreams died with an early-morning knock on the door Sept. 5, 1972.It was the swimmer next door in the Olympic dorm. There was some kind of trouble. The woman looked scared.Groggy from sleep, Rot's mind stuck on the story of two Americans who had overslept their Olympic events. She shuddered. Was she late for her hurdles race?No, she was told. This was serious. Men with guns. Masked men. Something about hostages. Somebody had been killed.Twenty years ago, Esther Rot awoke from dreams of Olympic victories to a nightmare of reality.
NEWS
July 4, 1999
Q. I'm trying white potatoes and sweet potatoes for the first time in my small vegetable garden. How do I know when to harvest these underground crops?A. You can begin digging small, tender new potatoes when the plants are blooming. Gently dig up a single plant with a garden fork and check tuber size for desired eating quality. For larger potatoes that you want to eat fresh or store, wait and harvest when the plants begin to die.Keep soil hilled up around the plants to increase the number of tubers formed and to prevent sunlight from turning your spuds green.
FEATURES
By MICHAE: DDRESSER | February 14, 1993
When torrential rain drenched the heart of California wine country just as the 1989 harvest was beginning, some writers jumped the gun and proclaimed the vintage a disaster -- the worst since the miserable 1972.Since then, many winemakers have come to the defense of this troubled vintage, especially its cabernet sauvignons. These wines, they say, were picked several weeks later, after good weather had allowed them to recover instead of rot.Some writers have seconded this motion. The eminent Hugh Johnson's 1993 Pocket Encyclopedia of Wine, says of the 1989 California cabernet crop: "First tastes very promising; dark, intense but not overripe wines."
NEWS
November 30, 1996
FINGERS WERE crossed and prayers whispered as tugs pushed the 142-year-old wooden warship Constellation a mile and a half to dry dock a week ago. The little voyage took an hour and 48 minutes, to make sure no mishap occurred aboard the fragile vessel that suffers from rot -- far better than the four hours that had been predicted. While the ship did take on water, high-speed auxiliary pumps didn't have to be used. It was an auspicious beginning for a project that means much to Baltimore.When there was little else to see at the Inner Harbor there was the Constellation.
NEWS
April 7, 1994
The transformation of Baltimore's Inner Harbor from rotting piers into a glittering waterfront recreational area is part of the nation's urban legend. But even as spring weather is drawing hordes of out-of-town tourists downtown, Baltimore promotion officials complain that thousands of locals never take advantage of attractions there.This weekend they are testing an intriguing question: If you throw a free party, will Baltimoreans come?On Saturday and Sunday, downtown shops, restaurants, institutions and neighborhoods will offer nearly 100 activities for everyone to explore.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
The letter "Obama should pardon Pollard" (March 18) could not be more wrong when it urges President Barack Obama to pardon the heinous traitor Jonathan Pollard, who is serving a life sentence for causing more harm to U.S. intelligence than any spy had in decades. The writer also has her priorities backward when she says that President Obama needs to "...mend some political fences with Israel and to promote warmer relations with Israeli leaders. " The U.S. gives Israel $3 billion and more every year in military aid, our latest military technology and diplomatic cover at the U.N. for its atrocities against the Palestinians.
EXPLORE
hippodromehatter@aol.com | December 6, 2012
Several years ago, I discovered a huge hole within a specimen tree where a large limb joined the trunk. Since the hole was facing upward, too, it was constantly collecting rainwater that was rotting the tree. However, I plugged the hole and was able to save the limb and the tree with a homemade patch that's still in good shape. Here's how: I began rescuing our tree by scraping out as much of the rotten wood as was possible. Then with a paint brush, I disinfected the hole by saturating it with lime sulfur, a powerful, plant fungicide that should only be applied to green growth when woody plants are dormant.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2012
As Maryland State Police disbanded an anti-abortion rally along a crowded road near the center of Bel Air, a sergeant told a colleague that the 18 arrested protesters could "sit in a cell for an hour ... and two or three or four and rot. " The same trooper, during another conversation from the Bel Air barracks, said of the group holding signs depicting gruesome images of aborted fetuses, "I am about ready to tell them to get the hell out of this...
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2011
Workers repairing the 1854 sloop of war Constellation have uncovered significant rot in the ship's hull. The damage, attributed to rainwater seeping into the hull from the gun ports, is expected to lengthen the ship's time in dry dock at the Sparrows Point Shipyard by 10 to 14 days and add about $70,000 to the $500,000 repair bill. The water intrusion has been stopped, and some of the rotted wood has been cut out and replaced. But Chris Rowsom, executive director of Historic Ships in Baltimore, said the Constellation will need more extensive repairs in two to three years that could take it away from the Inner Harbor for up to six months.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | October 7, 2006
Anyone who's been to or even by a landfill knows it can have a certain aroma. Lately, though, some of Maryland's landfills have begun to smell like money. Businesses and local governments are teaming up to generate electricity or steam from the methane gas produced by decomposing garbage buried in landfills. The move is prompted by rising natural gas prices, federal tax breaks and recently enacted state requirements, but it also helps combat a major environmental problem - global climate change - by curbing releases of harmful "greenhouse" gases that trap heat in Earth's atmosphere.
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 19, 2006
Our Early Girl tomatoes look fine, but when we cut into the fruit, one or more cavities is black. This is an unusual manifestation of blossom end rot. The cause is insufficient calcium taken up by the plant, usually due to insufficient or inconsistent watering. This is usually an early-season malady that goes away as the season progresses. Make sure your plants are well watered and, for a quick fix, use a calcium chloride spray product. Next spring, put a handful of lime or gypsum in the planting hole.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2003
A barn sitting where a subdivision road will soon be built is generally doomed to demolition, so the disassembling of a two-century-old specimen in Ellicott City wouldn't be astonishing. Except this barn will be put back together. Howard County Conservancy preservationists have raised $47,000 to have the unusual oak-and-chestnut structure meticulously taken apart and moved from the future Montjoy subdivision. Conservancy leaders expect to re-erect the barn in the spring on their Woodstock farm, which can never be developed.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | January 13, 1999
First time I ever saw him live, the Bulls were in Madison Square Garden. It must have been the late 1980s. I went as a fan, sat 10 rows behind the basket. And I can still hear the guy behind me, shrieking with delight the entire game, chanting in almost a singsong voice, "Jor-dan! Jor-dan!"More or less, that's what we've all been doing from the moment Michael Jordan provided his first big thrill, hitting the shot to lift North Carolina over Georgetown in the 1982 NCAA final. The entire country -- no, the entire world -- has spent the past 17 years bouncing up and down, screaming, "Jor-dan!
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 2006
Every year I have the same squash problem: Their crookneck yellows and the flower end rots off. I water once every two days. Choanephora rot is a very common fungal disease (mostly of squash but pumpkins, eggplant and chili peppers are also susceptible). It first appears on dying blossoms still attached to fruits. The disease then spreads to the fruit. (Sometimes it first appears at the stem end.) Affected fruit parts turn dark brown to black, very fuzzy and mushy. The pathogen likes warm, humid and rainy conditions.
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 31, 2005
My lucky bamboo plant has a yellow discoloration spot on its stalk. From previous experience, I know it will rot soon. How can I prevent this? Usually maintained in water with no soil, lucky bamboo (Dracaena sanderiana) is more closely related to lilies than bamboo. Try to improve cultural conditions. Mineral additives in the water are often a culprit. Avoid water with fluoride and chlorine, or let chlorine evaporate from water overnight before using. Change water every 15 to 30 days. Avoid temperature extremes or sudden changes, such as opening doors.
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