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NEWS
June 1, 1994
Rep. Dan Rostenkowski says, "I did not commit any crimes, my conscience is clear." And, "I strongly believe I am not guilty of these charges." If by those statements he means he did not do what a grand jury in Washington in a 17-count indictment said he did, then we hope he will be "vindicated," to use his word, by a trial jury. But if he means only, as some of his supporters have suggested, that he did what is charged but that this should not be considered felonious, then that's another matter.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 23, 2000
WASHINGTON - In the first batch of pardons of his final holiday season in the White House, President Clinton pardoned 59 people yesterday, including Dan Rostenkowski, the once-powerful chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, a man whose conviction exemplified the passing of an old-fashioned style of leadership in Congress. Rostenkowski, who was reared by the Chicago Democratic political machine, brought to Congress a mastery of the game of legislation with its premium on brokering, bluffing, and figuring out the compromise that gives the little required but gets a bit more in return.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder New Service | June 11, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Humble in the courtroom but defiant on the courthouse steps, Rep. Dan Rostenkowski quietly pleaded not guilty yesterday to multiple charges of fraud and embezzlement then boomed to reporters that he would "fight these false charges and prevail."Mr. Rostenkowski was barely audible as he told U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson that he understood the charges against him. He stood motionless at a witness lectern as lawyers discussed conditions for continuing bail on Mr. Rostenkowski's personal bond.
NEWS
April 11, 1996
MEMBERS OF CONGRESS will not appreciate former Rep. Dan Rostenkowski's almost-everyone-does-it defense of his conviction on corruption charges. The Chicago ward heeler who rose to be the always "powerful" chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee is going to federal prison for 17 months. But he goes still defiant, still refusing to accept the court's judgment that he is guilty of "a betrayal of trust."Federal prospectors insist they had an air-tight case against Rostenkowski for old-time boodling: kickbacks, slush funds, phantom employees, postal stamps for cash, personal services from government workers, taxpayer-funded gifts for friends and family.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service The Chicago Tribune contributed to this article | May 29, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Dan Rostenkowski has rejected a proposed plea agreement that would allow him to avert a broad criminal indictment on federal corruption charges, lawyers in the case said yesterday.His lawyers, who are still urging him to accept the agreement, have told federal prosecutors of the decision but asked them not to consider it final until the government's deadline Tuesday.The lawyers hope that he might change his mind over the weekend, but said that there was no reason to think he might do so.If the Chicago congressman is indicted, it would remove one of President Clinton's most powerful allies in the fight for health care reform.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 26, 1994
WASHINGTON -- On what many believed could be Rep. Dan Rostenkowski's last day as chairman of his beloved House Ways and Means Committee, the scene was like a death watch for a wounded king.Grim-faced aides moved about the committee room quietly. The likely successor, Rep. Sam M. Gibbons, D-Fla., hovered nearby. No one wantedto talk about what was on everyone's mind.Every so often, Mr. Rostenkowski would glance over at the bank of more than a dozen photographers he knew were there only to capture his misery over a possible federal indictment on ethics charges that might force him from the chairmanship and Congress.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | March 2, 1994
CHICAGO -- As Rep. Dan Rostenkowski spoke to the Democratic faithful of the 42nd Ward the other afternoon, a long sign stretched high across the wall behind him. It wasn't up there especially for him, but it could not have been more appropriate. It said: "Service is Our Chief Product."That, in one way or another, has been the motto and the political salvation of the chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee whose tenure in Congress after 36 years is now in severe jeopardy in the March 15 primary.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,Sun Staff Correspondent The Los Angeles Times contributed to this article | March 1, 1994
CHICAGO -- President Clinton, with beleaguered Rep. Dan Rostenkowski in tow, talked crime, health care, education -- and some very thinly veiled politics -- yesterday in a political rescue mission for the powerful House Ways and Means Committee chairman whose support Mr. Clinton needs on Capitol Hill.The president told his audience at Wright Junior College that "if it hadn't been for the leadership of the chairman," his budget-reduction package, approved last year by a single vote in the House, "would not have happened, and this economy today would not be on the right path it's on if we had not done it. That is a fact."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 25, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Dan Rostenkowski's lawyers have told federal prosecutors that he will step down as chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee and serve a relatively short prison term if the government agrees not to seek a multicount felony indictment, lawyers involved in the case said yesterday.Mr. Rostenkowski's concessions brought his defense team and federal prosecutors to the brink of a plea agreement that would probably end the career of one of the most powerful politicians in Congress, but would spare him a long, costly criminal trial and the risk of a long prison term.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 31, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Breaking months of silence about the investigation that has tarnished his 42-year career as an elected official, a defiant Rep. Dan Rostenkowski said yesterday that "truth is on my side" and vowed to fight an imminent federal indictment on corruption charges and remain in the House of Representatives until his vindication.Rejecting a proposed plea agreement that had been reached last week between federal prosecutors and his lawyers, the 66-year-old chairman of the Ways and Means Committee insisted once again that he was innocent and that he was prepared to be tried on a number of allegations of political graft.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 10, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Saying he had behaved no differently from most other members of Congress, former Rep. Dan Rostenkowski pleaded guilty to two charges of mail fraud yesterday and agreed to begin serving a 17-month prison sentence in 30 days.Rostenkowski, a Chicago Democrat who will become the most prominent lawmaker ever to go to prison for official corruption, stood dry-eyed, his arms folded across his chest, as Judge Norma H. Johnson of the U.S. District Court in Washington lectured him and imposed the sentence that the former congressman's lawyers had negotiated with federal prosecutors.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | November 4, 1994
CHICAGO -- Rumor has it that somewhere in the nation, men and women are campaigning for Congress.They are making speeches. Buying TV ads. Debating opponents, discussing issues, asking for votes.But not here.Not in the 5th Congressional District of Illinois. Not on Chicago's North Side.Not where Danny Rostenkowski lives.Some might consider a 17-count federal indictment an impediment to re-election. To Rosty it is not even a pebble in his shoe.He has no TV or radio ads. He has no campaign manager.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder New Service | June 11, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Humble in the courtroom but defiant on the courthouse steps, Rep. Dan Rostenkowski quietly pleaded not guilty yesterday to multiple charges of fraud and embezzlement then boomed to reporters that he would "fight these false charges and prevail."Mr. Rostenkowski was barely audible as he told U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson that he understood the charges against him. He stood motionless at a witness lectern as lawyers discussed conditions for continuing bail on Mr. Rostenkowski's personal bond.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 10, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Sam M. Gibbons' formal takeover yesterday of the House Ways and Means Committee's chairmanship from Dan Rostenkowski seemed like Florida sunshine suddenly descending upon a blustery Chicago winter.The Florida Democrat started the session a little late, turned off the red light that warns members they are talking too long, and joshed around a bit.Mr. Gibbons' folksy style broke the tension, so that even Mr. Rostenkowski seemed relaxed in his newly diminished role as No. 2.But on substance, the Florida Democrat's first day as acting leader of one of the most powerful committees in Congress was a flop.
NEWS
By Roger Simon and Roger Simon,Sun Columnist | June 5, 1994
CHICAGO -- On the morning of the worst day of his life, on the day he would be called a swindler, a thief and a liar on national television, Dan Rostenkowski sat alone, connected to the world only by a telephone.A call came in from a well-wisher, not an important call, just another call from the legion of people who owed something to Rostenkowski, to Rosty, to the chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee.Rosty took the call and, to the surprise of the caller, he did not seem down in the dumps.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | June 2, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Nobody in his right mind would argue that the indictment of Dan Rostenkowski is not bad news for the Democratic Party and President Clinton.Republicans already are braying, understandably, about the case as the inevitable product of 40 years of Democratic control of the House.But the notion that health care reform has been put in dire jeopardy by the absence of one committee chairman is overblown.It is true that Rostenkowski has demonstrated a remarkable facility as chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee for forging compromises that can enlist differing Democrats behind common legislative purposes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 10, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Saying he had behaved no differently from most other members of Congress, former Rep. Dan Rostenkowski pleaded guilty to two charges of mail fraud yesterday and agreed to begin serving a 17-month prison sentence in 30 days.Rostenkowski, a Chicago Democrat who will become the most prominent lawmaker ever to go to prison for official corruption, stood dry-eyed, his arms folded across his chest, as Judge Norma H. Johnson of the U.S. District Court in Washington lectured him and imposed the sentence that the former congressman's lawyers had negotiated with federal prosecutors.
NEWS
April 11, 1996
MEMBERS OF CONGRESS will not appreciate former Rep. Dan Rostenkowski's almost-everyone-does-it defense of his conviction on corruption charges. The Chicago ward heeler who rose to be the always "powerful" chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee is going to federal prison for 17 months. But he goes still defiant, still refusing to accept the court's judgment that he is guilty of "a betrayal of trust."Federal prospectors insist they had an air-tight case against Rostenkowski for old-time boodling: kickbacks, slush funds, phantom employees, postal stamps for cash, personal services from government workers, taxpayer-funded gifts for friends and family.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | June 1, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The decision of House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dan Rostenkowski to fight the charges of misuse of public funds rather than accept a plea bargain may complicate President Clinton's drive for health care reform. But in addition to giving Rosty his day in court, it will probably do more for public confidence in the political system than a behind-the-scenes deal that would always be suspect in the eyes of many average Americans.Plea-bargaining -- negotiating a plea with an alleged wrongdoer to avoid a lengthy and costly trial in return for a lighter sentence than a jury might mete out -- is a commonplace of today's vastly overcrowded court dockets.
NEWS
June 1, 1994
Rep. Dan Rostenkowski says, "I did not commit any crimes, my conscience is clear." And, "I strongly believe I am not guilty of these charges." If by those statements he means he did not do what a grand jury in Washington in a 17-count indictment said he did, then we hope he will be "vindicated," to use his word, by a trial jury. But if he means only, as some of his supporters have suggested, that he did what is charged but that this should not be considered felonious, then that's another matter.
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