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Ross Perot

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NEWS
April 30, 1992
Both the Democratic and Republican parties are analyzing the growing strength of Dallas billionaire Ross Perot as a presidential candidate. Strategists in the campaigns of Democratic front-runner Bill Clinton and President Bush are trying the address the impact of an independent campaign by Mr. Perot.The Evening Sun would like to know what you think. Would a Perot candidacy have the most impact on the Democrats or Republicans? Could Mr. Perot be elected as an independent? Do you feel he or Mr. Clinton would be the stronger Democratic candidate?
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FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | June 20, 2007
YOU CAN fool all the people all the time if the advertising budget is big enough," says Ed Rollins. Mr. Rollins happened by Michael's cafe this week where I was lunching with speechwriter-columnist Peggy Noonan. We greeted the genial Ed, who had worked for Ronald Reagan and other Republicans, including Christine Todd Whitman and the unelectable Michael Huffington. Rollins became famous at the end of the latter's campaign, saying: "In three decades as a political junkie, I never worked a more miserable, depressing, or rotten race than the 1994 Huffington Senate campaign.
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NEWS
March 28, 1992
The presidency is "the toughest, dirtiest, most thankless job in the world, that is absolutely brutal on your family and everybody you love," says H. Ross Perot. But somebody has to do it, and he is willing. And, obviously, a lot of Americans want the self-made Texas billionaire, philanthropist and patriotic activist to do it, too. For instance, Charlene Osborne of Wilson Point. She called The Sun to find out how to support a Perot candidacy. Referred to Dallas telephone information, she got an 800 number, where she was told she would be sent information on how to help get Mr. Perot on the ballot in Maryland.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik | October 2, 2004
Not since October 1992 -- when President George H.W. Bush faced Gov. Bill Clinton and Ross Perot -- have so many Americans tuned in for a presidential debate. On Thursday, more than 65 million Americans saw the first debate between President Bush and Sen. John F. Kerry. Here's how many people watched on each channel, according to estimates from Nielsen Media Research: NBC: 17.2 million CBS: 13.5 million ABC: 11.5 million Fox News Channel: 9.6 million Fox Broadcast Network: 5.2 million CNN: 4.4 million PBS: 3.1 million MSNBC: 1.2 million The sole vice presidential debate is scheduled to air Tuesday from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland.
NEWS
September 21, 1993
As a would-be governor of Maryland, Rep. Helen Delich Bentley should give a close reading to what a real governor -- William Donald Schaefer -- has to say about the North American Free Trade Agreement. On the page opposite, Mr. Schaefer says NAFTA is not just a good idea but an "absolute necessity." He poses two rhetorical questions:"Will this agreement create jobs in Maryland? The answer is yes."Will this agreement be good for Maryland economically? Again, the answer is yes."Yet Maryland's Second District congresswoman has become the anti-NAFTA movement's favorite Republican, the one protectionist voice that can be relied upon to bash Mexico as she has bashed Japan for years.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | August 14, 1995
DALLAS -- Contrary to some expectations, Ross Perot's political conference was indeed a learning experience:Bob Dole learned that he should not follow Pat Buchanan to a podium.Bob Dole showed the crowd his feelings and got polite applause.Pat Buchanan played upon the feelings of the crowd and got applause like rolling thunder.It was not, however, a typical crowd. We learned that on Friday:Jesse Jackson gave a speech espousing very liberal values and got one of the two standing ovations of the day.Newt Gingrich then gave a speech espousing very conservative values and got the other.
NEWS
By TRB | April 30, 1992
Washington -- As a person and as a political phenomenon, H. Ross Perot is deplorable in many ways. Let us list some of them.First, from a partisan perspective, Mr. Perot's candidacy surely will hurt Bill Clinton more than George Bush in the end. Mr. Clinton can only win by turning the election into a referendum on the incumbent, and Mr. Perot will be there to split the ''no'' vote.Second, Mr. Perot's popularity illustrates either the decadence of the political system or the political immaturity of the electorate (take your pick)
NEWS
By Tom Nugent | June 20, 1994
YOUR newspaper reported not long ago that the average cost for a family of four to attend an Orioles baseball game at Camden Yards is now $108.50.So I called Ross Perot.Imagine my surprise when the billionaire sometimes presidential candidate answered on the first ring."This is Perot," he snapped. "Talk to me!"Elated by the way my call had gone straight through to Mr. Bigbucks, I blared excitedly in his ear: "Mr. Perot, I'm calling from Baltimore."I need your help, sir!"There was a pause on the other end.I could hear the wheels turning, as one of the top financial analysts of our time mulled my request."
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | October 28, 1992
Here's the deal. Either Ross Perot is delusional (the precise medical term, I believe, is "a nut-case") or the Bush-Quayle team members make the Watergate plumbers look like boy scouts.Or both.I'm not slow dancin', folks. We'll go over this again. Perot's a nut, or G. Gordon Liddy is back in business.I called Liddy, of Watergate fame, who's now a lecturer, Washington talk-show host and Bunsen-burner tester, to see if he is on the case."I'm retired," he said.But not retiring. Liddy had this to say about Perot's recent allegations: "The man is definitely paranoid.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 17, 1992
NEW YORK -- He didn't lack for money. He didn't lack for audacity. But in the end, Ross Perot lacked one thing you need if you want to become president:Courage.Perot does not possess, in other words, what both Bill Clinton and George Bush possess.Bill Clinton is not called The Comeback Kid for nothing. After a series of bruising revelations and damaging headlines during the New Hampshire primary this February, Clinton hung tough and stayed in.The press was surprised. They expected him to do what Joe Biden had done when he was accused of plagiarism and what Gary Hart had done when he was accused of womanizing four years ago: cut and run.But Clinton decided he would let the people and not the press judge him. And if the people wanted to bury him, they could simply withhold their votes.
NEWS
By Marcia Gelbart and Marcia Gelbart,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 19, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - A late 13th-century copy of the Magna Carta, the foundation for the U.S. Constitution, will pay its second visit to Philadelphia in almost 15 years. Housed now in the National Archives in Washington, the document will be displayed at the new Independence Visitor Center, formerly known as the Gateway Visitor Center, at Sixth Street between Market and Arch. Now under construction, the $30 million building is expected to open in late fall and display the Magna Carta until March 2003.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 11, 2000
LONG BEACH, Calif. - The Reform Party split into separate factions yesterday, putting it into a political parallel universe with two of everything - two sets of delegates, two conventions and two presidential candidates calling themselves the rightful leaders of the independent movement. Both groups - one headed by conservative television commentator Patrick J. Buchanan, the other by physicist and transcendental meditation practitioner John Hagelin - declared their faction the "real" Reform Party while clashing over who was the legitimate heir to a stash of public campaign money.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 17, 2000
NORTH BRANCH, N. J. - Patrick J. Buchanan is telling a story about two dead dogs. Specifically, the barking guard dogs in a Southwest border town that ate glass-spiked meat - a meal, he suggests, tossed at them by illegal immigrants seeking silence as they sneaked into this country. Rousing the crowd at the New Jersey Reform Party convention this week, Buchanan denounces a "gutless" government that won't defend its border with Mexico and calls for putting U.S. troops there and ridding the country of illegal immigrants.
TOPIC
By John Hendren | January 16, 2000
NEW YORK -- Bertie Forbes spent a lot of the little money he had to convince people that he was what he was not: rich. The young journalist bought a suit and booked a room at the Waldorf. It was the best way to meet the business leaders he wrote about, the impoverished Scottish immigrant told friends. "It was spending, but with a purpose," says his grandson, Steve Forbes. Eighty years later, Steve Forbes has no problem persuading anyone of his wealth. His concern is showing people he can be president.
NEWS
By George F. Will | October 14, 1999
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- Lenin said that any cook can run the state. The wrestler running this one believes, as Lenin did not, what Lenin said.Jesse Ventura, a human Vesuvius who does not believe in hoarding himself, has Minnesota so well in hand he has time to give interviews promiscuously -- 25 a week, he says.Nowadays these include interviews to tidy up after interviews, such as the one in Playboy wherein he said organized religion is for the weak-minded (such as Mrs. Ventura, he later explained)
NEWS
August 22, 1999
THE KIND offer of Warren Beatty to consider serving his nation as president should not go unappreciated.Confiding to a reporter that he might run for the Democratic nomination to compensate for others' inadequacies, Mr. Beatty comes from the proud tradition of Hollywood film stars who sacrifice career for public service. Sen. Fred Thompson of Tennessee comes to mind, as well as Representatives Sonny Bono and Helen Gahagan Douglas and Sen. George Murphy -- all of California -- and, of course, President Ronald Reagan.
NEWS
July 22, 1992
* Anne Bracken, 39, of Ellicott City, works for the Jemicy School in Owings Mills:No, I really don't think so. I think we should have the two-party system. I have to believe in what he's saying that it's not because of any personal gain. It's good so that parties aren't split. It would be a lot spicier if he was in.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 26, 1999
DEARBORN, Mich. -- As the Reform Party seeks to revive its waning influence in presidential politics, members voted yesterday to ditch its old leadership and embrace a candidate endorsed by former wrestler turned populist sensation Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura.Delegates at the third annual Reform Party convention elected former financier Jack Gargan as party chairman. Gargan, who grew up on a chicken farm and talks about government reform with a country drawl, was seen by some as a repudiation of another twangy Reform Party personality, founder Ross Perot.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 25, 1999
DEARBORN, Mich. -- Texas billionaire Ross Perot greeted a room full of followers last night with his familiar rant against establishment politics and then offered some advice to his own Reform Party, now beset by brewing divisions."
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