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Rosie The Riveter

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NEWS
March 1, 2009
The Ellicott City Senior Center, 9401 Frederick Road, will offer Thirst 'n' Howl Musical Productions' Rosie The Riveter, an original revue honoring the women of the 1940s who supported the home front during World War II, at 1 p.m. Tuesday. Admission is free. "Heart Health for Women," a free program presented by Marilyn Smedberg-Gobbett, volunteer coordinator with the National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease, will be presented at 10:30 a.m. Thursday. She will discuss prevention, early detection, diagnosis and proper treatment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kevin Leonard | April 10, 2014
With most of the young men off to war, the nation's industries turned to another source of labor to supply the necessities to fight World War II: women. The vast majority of the nation pulled together to support the war effort that began in 1941, and women of all ages were asked to shoulder the manufacturing load for the duration of the war. Almost 3 million women answered the call. Out of this workforce the character of Rosie the Riveter was born. The term was first used in a hit song in 1942.
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NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Sun Staff Writer | February 12, 1995
A half-century later, Shirley Morrisey can still hear the maddening din of the Baltimore aircraft plant where she was the woman behind the man behind the gun."It was so noisy you couldn't think," said Ms. Morrisey, 72. "When I was riveting tail sections of those planes, I always thought about those young American boys who would be flying in them. I wanted to be perfect."Mary Grahe remembers the physical pain and emotional anguish. "It was hard work in those plants, the noise, lying down in all positions to get to the wings," she said.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 17, 2011
Anna Iris Ray Meyer, who joined the war effort in the 1940s by working on bomber planes as a "Rosie the Riveter," died July 14 at her daughter's home in Fallston. She was 92. Mrs. Meyer, who was known as Iris, had a sweet, easygoing nature, said daughter Doris Jean Tobias. But Mrs. Meyer, the second of six children raised on a farm in Newdale, N.C., also knew how to care for herself and her family. She learned to grow and can food and barter for other needs. She worked through school caring for her grandparents.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Kevin Rector,SUN REPORTER | June 20, 2008
In 1942, 20-year-old Elsie Arnold heard surprising news: The Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River was hiring women to help build airplanes for World War II. At the time, industrial work was largely the territory of men, but as the war continued, women across the country were increasingly filling positions left by men shipped off to fight. Seeing an opportunity to make money and help in the war effort, Arnold moved to the area from Garrett County and joined a growing number of women drilling, riveting and soldering bombers and other planes at the Martin aircraft company.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2001
In 1942, Julia Yoder, barely out of high school, took a bus to Baltimore from her home in the Pennsylvania mountains, rented a room at the YWCA and landed a job as a solderer at the Glenn L. Martin factory in Middle River. All within 24 hours. "It was not hard to get a job then," said Yoder, 77. "I made $36 a week and that was big money. And the Y was a treat - it had electricity and running water." Yoder, a Finksburg resident, reminisced at a Rosie reunion on Saturday at the Baltimore Museum of Industry.
NEWS
March 15, 2004
First hour of parking free at airport garage Baltimore-Washington International Airport is now offering free one-hour parking in its hourly garage. Drivers are encouraged to take advantage of the one-hour free parking as an alternative to curbside passenger drop-off or pickup. By using the hourly garage, drivers will help avoid congestion in front of the terminal during construction. Event to focus on role of women in World War II The Maryland Aviation Administration will present a Women's History Month program at 10 a.m. March 30 in BWI's Observation Gallery.
NEWS
March 15, 2004
First hour of parking free at airport garage Baltimore-Washington International Airport is now offering free one-hour parking in its hourly garage. Drivers are encouraged to take advantage of the one-hour free parking as an alternative to curbside passenger drop-off or pickup. Event to focus on role of women in World War II The Maryland Aviation Administration will present a Women's History Month program at 10 a.m. March 30 in BWI's Observation Gallery. "Aprons to Airplanes: Rosie the Riveter Does Double Duty During World War II" will feature members of the Baltimore chapter of the Rosie the Riveter Association.
NEWS
February 22, 2005
Louise Langellotto, a retired bookkeeper and World War II aircraft assembly worker who was a charter member of the Rosie the Riveter organization, died of pneumonia Feb. 15 at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The Highlandtown resident was 91. Born Louise Muscillo in Lafferty, Ohio, she moved to Highlandtown's Eaton Street in 1930 after her marriage to Donato Langellotto, when he was transferred by Bethlehem Steel Corp. to its Sparrows Point pipe mill. During the war, Mrs. Langellotto answered a call for women to work in defense industries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paula Watson and Paula Watson,Dallas Morning News | January 2, 2000
The World War II propaganda poster paints a portrait of the icon who gets my vote for Woman of the Century: Bandana wrapped around her head (with a singular feminine curl peeking out), muscular arms, blue workshirt. With her jaw set and chin held high, she proclaims, "We Can Do It." Rosie the Riveter was true to her word. Some 20 million women went to work and war in shipyards, refineries, aircraft plants, train yards, offices, stores, shops. Not all of them were Rosies, but Rosie the Riveter became the symbol of women's ability and willingness to do their part.
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg, Jholzberg76@msn.com | June 30, 2011
Wilma Ferrebee was still in high school in 1941 when President Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed the nation on the heels of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. "I can still hear his voice saying we're at war," said the 65-year resident of Laurel, who became Wilma Foster when she wed Abe Foster and they moved into town as a young married couple. When World War II started, she was living with her family on their Virginia farm, leading the simple life of a young woman with a Christian upbringing and close family ties.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | November 1, 2009
A large, framed poster from 1943 hangs on the wall of Hermione C. "Hermie" Graham's Columbia home. It features a young African-American woman sitting at a telephone switchboard busily routing incoming and outgoing phone calls through a plug board. It is one of Graham's prized family treasures. The young woman on the poster with the perfectly coiffed hair and carefully pressed summer dress is Albertine Hinkson Graham, Hermie's mother, who died this month at age 94. The poster recalls a long-forgotten stop on the road to equality that happened in Baltimore more than 65 years ago. Albertine Graham, the daughter of a Pennsylvania Railroad redcap who worked at Penn Station and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | September 7, 2009
Josephine Feige, a matriarch renowned for her cooking who had been a Rosie the Riveter during World War II, died of renal failure Aug. 26 at Lancaster General Hospital in Lancaster, Pa. The former Carney resident was 90. Born Josephine Ferruggio in Baltimore, she was the daughter of a Sicilian immigrant barber, Peter Ferruggio, whose wife died shortly after giving birth to twin daughters. Being the eldest daughter, Josephine, then a 14-year-old, left school - she had graduated from eighth grade at St. Dominic's Parochial School - and raised the twins as well as her three additional sisters.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Kevin Rector,SUN REPORTER | June 20, 2008
In 1942, 20-year-old Elsie Arnold heard surprising news: The Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River was hiring women to help build airplanes for World War II. At the time, industrial work was largely the territory of men, but as the war continued, women across the country were increasingly filling positions left by men shipped off to fight. Seeing an opportunity to make money and help in the war effort, Arnold moved to the area from Garrett County and joined a growing number of women drilling, riveting and soldering bombers and other planes at the Martin aircraft company.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,sun reporter | April 26, 2007
By any conventional measure, Rosie O'Donnell does not seem like someone who would succeed on television. She doesn't conform with traditional ideas of beauty. She's a lesbian mother of four. She's blunt and fearless and opinionated in a medium where it seems only men can get away with that. She picks fights with Donald Trump. But O'Donnell's announcement yesterday that she's leaving the daytime gabfest The View after less than a year as a co-host left many fans shocked and in tears. Executives at ABC, which airs the program, also had reason to cry: Since O'Donnell joined the show in September, viewership of The View is up 17 percent, to 3.5 million.
NEWS
By DIANE CAMERON | August 1, 2006
We are at the halfway point of summer. About now we begin to note how fast it's going. Some folks like to take their vacation at the end of August, but most of us can't wait that long for a little time away. But who, these days, is really away from work when they are "away"? Oh, we laugh at the guy with the cell phone in the woods and the woman tap-tapping on a laptop at the beach. Most of us don't go that far, but we do check our e-mail, or leave our hotel phone number "just in case." Technology, we've learned to say, has revolutionized the way we work.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | September 7, 2009
Josephine Feige, a matriarch renowned for her cooking who had been a Rosie the Riveter during World War II, died of renal failure Aug. 26 at Lancaster General Hospital in Lancaster, Pa. The former Carney resident was 90. Born Josephine Ferruggio in Baltimore, she was the daughter of a Sicilian immigrant barber, Peter Ferruggio, whose wife died shortly after giving birth to twin daughters. Being the eldest daughter, Josephine, then a 14-year-old, left school - she had graduated from eighth grade at St. Dominic's Parochial School - and raised the twins as well as her three additional sisters.
NEWS
By From staff reports | August 14, 2003
In Baltimore City Police union OKs one-year contract with no pay raise A one-year contract providing no increase in pay while requiring members to contribute 15 percent of the cost of medical benefits was ratified yesterday by the city police union, its president announced. "We all know the city is in a fiscal crisis, but I'm glad the contract proposal was ratified," Police Agent Dan Fickus, president of Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 3, said after the voting by members of its two units.
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