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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | September 17, 1990
"The Trials of Rosie O'Neill" has all the right intentions, but something seems wrong with this picture, something that's hard to put your finger on. It's just so . . . so conventional.Here's Sharon Gless, back in her old Monday at 10 o'clock on CBS time slot she had with "Cagney and Lacey," back with the creator of that show, Barney Rosenzweig, ready to use her squinty smile, likability and considerable talent to take on the problems of a divorced, childless, middle-age woman.That's all well and good.
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By Knight-Ridder Tribune | August 23, 2002
It's a long road from Perry Mason, who won nearly every case of his career - often by extracting confessions on the witness stand - to The Practice's conflicted Bobby Donnell (Dylan McDermott), whose firm's innocent clients - and even its lawyers -seem more likely to go to jail than his guilty ones. TV prosecutors may have the limelight now, but for decades, we've watched their opponents. Among them: Lawrence (E.G. Marshall) and Kenneth Preston (Robert Reed), the father-son team from The Defenders (1961-1965)
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 17, 1990
Let's get right to the part of "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill" tha everyone is going to be talking about: the opening.The new drama, starring Sharon Gless as attorney Rosie O'Neill, opens in a psychiatrist's office. We don't see the psychiatrist. We see only a tight shot of Gless' face. It is as if she is talking straight to the viewer.The first words we hear Gless' Rosie O'Neill say are: "I'm %J thinking about maybe having my tits done. I mean, I don't want them any bigger. They're a nice size.
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June 7, 1993
Jack Priestly, 66, an award-winning cinematographer who worked in television and film, died May 26 at his home in Los Angeles. He began his career as a camera assistant. His work in television won him many awards, including two Emmys as director of photography for the series "Naked City." He also received Emmy nominations for "East Side, West Side" and "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill." Among his other television credits are "Colombo," "Cagney and Lacey," "A Man Called Hawk" and "Madigan." He also worked on "Family Reunion," "The Snoop Sisters" and "Kojak."
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,TV Critic | March 25, 1992
Washington -- Call it Rosie O'Neill goes to Washington. More elaborate efforts may have been made to save a TV show from cancellation, but surely none has been as public as the campaign by Sharon Gless and her husband, Barney Rosenzweig, to save "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill," which has been on "hiatus" and out of production since December. Last night, the Gless-Rosenzweig save-our-show bandwagon rolled into Washington, where some very high-profile women in law and politics climbed aboard.
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By Steve McKerrow | April 13, 1991
It's "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill" (CBS) going away, with "Gabriel's Fire" (ABC) and "Law & Order" (NBC) in almost a dead heat for the place position, while "The Simpsons" (Fox) trails distantly.Yes, fans, those are the results of the ratings race for best new shows of the 1990-'91 season -- at least, as they are measured for each network by this column's readers.We asked: What new shows last fall (or the previous spring) are worth saving?Your answers clearly make "Rosie O'Neill" the most popular new series of the season.
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By STEVE MCKERROW | October 20, 1990
The new television season is inspiring no great excitement anywhere. But "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill" may be a mild exception, judging from the response to this column's recent request for predictions of hit or miss new series.Seen at 10 p.m. Mondays on CBS (Channel 11), the show is the new vehicle for actress Sharon Gless ("Cagney & Lacey"). She plays a frequently depressed, divorced public defender who comes from money and parks her Mercedes blocks from the office in hopes of being better accepted.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,TV Critic | March 25, 1992
Washington -- Call it Rosie O'Neill goes to Washington.More elaborate efforts may have been made to save a TV show from cancellation, but surely none has been as public as the campaign by Sharon Gless and her husband, Barney Rosenzweig, to save "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill," which has been on "hiatus" and out of production since December.Last night, the Gless-Rosenzweig save-our-show bandwagon rolled into Washington, where some very high-profile women in law and politics climbed aboard."Personally, I'm a little angry and tired of asking people to support my work," Gless said.
NEWS
June 7, 1993
Jack Priestly, 66, an award-winning cinematographer who worked in television and film, died May 26 at his home in Los Angeles. He began his career as a camera assistant. His work in television won him many awards, including two Emmys as director of photography for the series "Naked City." He also received Emmy nominations for "East Side, West Side" and "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill." Among his other television credits are "Colombo," "Cagney and Lacey," "A Man Called Hawk" and "Madigan." He also worked on "Family Reunion," "The Snoop Sisters" and "Kojak."
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By Steve McKerrow | November 13, 1990
Who says they don't make quality television shows anymore? Voting members of Viewers for Quality Television, a national advocacy group, have found seven new series worthy of consideration for endorsement this season.In the latest VQT survey, taken last month, respondents nominated these new shows onto the organization's Tentative Support List: "Evening Shade" (CBS), "Gabriel's Fire" (ABC), "Law & Order" (NBC), "Lifestories" (NBC), "Northern Exposure" (an expected NBC mid-season replacement)
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By Susan Stewart and Susan Stewart,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 10, 1992
A healthy, active sex life is a wonderful thing. I'm all for people having a healthy, active sex life well into their 90s, or even their 50s. I just don't want them to have it on TV.Robert Wagner is lending his Wagnerian charisma to yet another trial of the long-admired and low-rated CBS show, "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill." He plays Sharon Gless' date in "Rosie's" next three episodes (beginning Saturday night at 10 p.m. on Channel 11). Heart-shaped diamond pendants, smoldering stares and dewy glances.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,TV Critic | March 25, 1992
Washington -- Call it Rosie O'Neill goes to Washington. More elaborate efforts may have been made to save a TV show from cancellation, but surely none has been as public as the campaign by Sharon Gless and her husband, Barney Rosenzweig, to save "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill," which has been on "hiatus" and out of production since December. Last night, the Gless-Rosenzweig save-our-show bandwagon rolled into Washington, where some very high-profile women in law and politics climbed aboard.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,TV Critic | March 25, 1992
Washington -- Call it Rosie O'Neill goes to Washington.More elaborate efforts may have been made to save a TV show from cancellation, but surely none has been as public as the campaign by Sharon Gless and her husband, Barney Rosenzweig, to save "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill," which has been on "hiatus" and out of production since December.Last night, the Gless-Rosenzweig save-our-show bandwagon rolled into Washington, where some very high-profile women in law and politics climbed aboard."Personally, I'm a little angry and tired of asking people to support my work," Gless said.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | December 19, 1991
These are trying times for fans of "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill," who are in for some unpleasant surprises tonight. For one thing, the much-promoted start of a romance between Rosie (Sharon Gless) and a character portrayed by Robert Wagner will not air. Instead, viewers will find a rerun of last season's Christmas show -- the one in which Rosie defends an elf.Much worse, tonight all but marks the end of the line for "Rosie." Though the official word from CBS is that the show will be placed "on hiatus" and could return in March after the Winter Olympics, executive producer Barney Rosenzweig told The Sun this week that the program is shutting down production.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 25, 1991
Sharon Gless and Carol Burnett rose yesterday from the ashes of spring pre-emption and outright cancellation, respectively, to find new life on CBS for next fall. "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill," which disappeared from the CBS schedule this spring, was picked up for the fall. "Carol & Company," which was canceled Monday by NBC, will be reborn on CBS as "The Carol Burnett Show."Other shows renewed from last year were "Northern Exposure," "Evening Shade" and "Top Cops." They'll be joined next fall by new shows starring Redd Foxx, Della Reese and Connie Sellecca.
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By Steve McKerrow | April 13, 1991
It's "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill" (CBS) going away, with "Gabriel's Fire" (ABC) and "Law & Order" (NBC) in almost a dead heat for the place position, while "The Simpsons" (Fox) trails distantly.Yes, fans, those are the results of the ratings race for best new shows of the 1990-'91 season -- at least, as they are measured for each network by this column's readers.We asked: What new shows last fall (or the previous spring) are worth saving?Your answers clearly make "Rosie O'Neill" the most popular new series of the season.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 21, 1990
"Against The Law" is another after-the-fall drama about a lawyer.Like Jack Shannon, of "Shannon's Deal," and Rosie O'Neill, of "The Trials of Rose O'Neill," Simon MacHeath (Michael O'Keefe) is a former corporate attorney who had it all, lost or gave it away and is now trying to lead a decent life of some public service instead of only "the good life" of private gain.In the Fox pilot, which airs at 9:30 Sunday night on WBFF-TV (Channel 45), MacHeath is divorced, but he and his ex-wife still feel some sparks.
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By Knight-Ridder Tribune | August 23, 2002
It's a long road from Perry Mason, who won nearly every case of his career - often by extracting confessions on the witness stand - to The Practice's conflicted Bobby Donnell (Dylan McDermott), whose firm's innocent clients - and even its lawyers -seem more likely to go to jail than his guilty ones. TV prosecutors may have the limelight now, but for decades, we've watched their opponents. Among them: Lawrence (E.G. Marshall) and Kenneth Preston (Robert Reed), the father-son team from The Defenders (1961-1965)
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By Steve McKerrow | January 28, 1991
For the benefit of those who might not want to sit through three hours, here are the key sermon points of "Which Way Home," spoken by stars Cybill Shepherd and John Waters, respectively:"Sooner or later we all have to learn to take responsibility for each other.""Sometimes things happen because we need to learn something."Naturally there is much more dialogue in this latest world premiere movie from the TNT cable network, at 8 tonight (and repeating at 11 p.m.) on the basic cable service.
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By Holly Selby | November 18, 1990
Two years ago when John met Sandra at work, he never dreamed they'd ever be anything more than colleagues.After all, she's old enough to be his mother.Nonetheless, says the Baltimore real estate developer who's 36, he and the woman (who prefers to say she's fiftysomething -- and leave it at that) have been dating for nearly a year. "The biggest attraction is spiritual, and that is what bonds us more than physical attraction," he says.But don't get him wrong, they can get physical, too."We have a spiritual relationship, an emotional relationship and a physical relationship," he says.
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