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By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 12, 1997
Rosie O'Donnell introduced Broadway's new toll-free hot line on her show yesterday by calling for information on "Triumph of Love," the musical that had its world premiere at Center Stage last season.O'Donnell gushed over the musical -- which was produced by Baltimore native Margo Lion and has a book by Center Stage resident dramaturg James Magruder -- and over star Betty Buckley. The talk show host even tried to sing one of "Triumph's" songs before the operator on the new Broadway Line cut her off.Besides providing general show information, the number, 1-888-411-BWAY, allows callers to buy tickets, listen to recorded greetings from stars and answer a Broadway trivia question.
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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
The author and filmmaker Nora Ephron, who died Tuesday night, had a famous love affair with food. Ephron was the maven who knew where to get the best coffee cake, cappuccino and smoked salmon in New York City. She didn't just back into the idea of making the (kind of) Julia Child biopic, "Julia & Julia," her last movie. The movies Ephron made are full of food-love. There's Meg Ryan's "high-maintenance, dressing-on-the-side instructions to waiters in"When Harry Met Sally" -- I just want it the way I want it. " That same movie, of course, is responsible for one of the most famous restaurant scenes in movie history, set in Katz's Delicatessen.  A cookbook writer is the heroine of "Heartburn," the movie version of Ephron's novel into which she threaded some of her own favorite recipes.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 7, 1994
Reaching her childhood dream "is harder than anything I've ever done," asserts Rosie O'Donnell. No joke.Stand-up comedy, television work and movie roles don'tcompare to the difficulty of performing in live theater, says the performer, who portrays tough gal Betty Rizzo in the Broadway-bound revival of "Grease," playing at the National Theatre in Washington through March 12.What has been so hard about her first stage play?"
FEATURES
January 15, 2008
Critic's Pick -- Dawn Budge (Rosie O'Donnell) is back and needs more plastic surgery after another unfortunate incident on Nip / Tuck (10 p.m., FX).
FEATURES
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | January 23, 2006
Every afternoon, a small miracle occurs at the American Visionary Art Museum. That's what director Rebecca Hoffberger told the VIPs who arrived early enough for a whirlwind tour of AVAM's newest exhibit, Race, Class, Gender Do Not Equal Character, before the museum's black-tie 10th-anniversary gala got started Saturday night. On one wall hung dozens of tiny quilts, each created by black South African women in the days after apartheid ended. Across the room was a wire-and-mirror portrait of Nelson Mandela, who helped bring that horror to an end. Every day about 2:30, Hoffberger said, sunlight streaming through a window falls on Mandela's face and reflects directly onto the tapestries.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1998
Rosie O'Donnell came to town yesterday for the first time since her days as a stand-up comic in the late '80s. And as her limo glided soundlessly from the airport past the new downtown stadiums and into the glass and metal canyons of the Inner Harbor, her take on the city's updated look was a trademark: "You rock, Baltimore!"The star of "The Rosie O'Donnell Show" was here to lend her considerable celebrity to pre-opening festivities at the Port Discovery children's museum, and Baltimore responded by going into full-tilt Big Event mode: crowds straining behind metal barriers, satellite trucks, banks of TV cameras, grim-looking cops on horseback, beefy security guys in windbreakers, jittery PR flacks whispering into cell phones.
NEWS
By John Tanasychuk and John Tanasychuk,Knight Ridder/Tribune | February 28, 1999
If you watch "The Rosie O'Donnell Show," you might know the face, if not the name, of Judy Molnar. Since late December, Molnar has been a regular presence in her new position as Chub Club coach.After eight years at a St. Joseph, Mich., advertising company, Molnar has moved to Manhattan. Her career change came after her 150-pound weight loss caught the eye of O'Donnell's producers last fall. She was on her way to the Ironman Triathlon World Championship in Hawaii.Here was a woman who had lost 150 pounds "one doughnut at a time," as she is fond of saying.
FEATURES
January 15, 2008
Critic's Pick -- Dawn Budge (Rosie O'Donnell) is back and needs more plastic surgery after another unfortunate incident on Nip / Tuck (10 p.m., FX).
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,special to the sun | June 22, 1997
It should come as no surprise that literary culture, a last holdout, has been invaded by the Rosie O'Donnell phenomenon, as slick an example of marketing as ever to substitute sham for substance.Once authors appeared on daytime and early evening television talk shows. Having written a book granted you air time, whether or not the majority of Americans had ever heard your name. Once Mary McCarthy told Dick Cavett, referring to Lillian Hellman, that every word she writes "is a lie, including 'and' and 'the.
FEATURES
By SARAH KICKLER KELBER | January 6, 2007
Reality TV took a bit of a break for the holidays, but the schedule is heating up again. Tomorrow night at 9:30, the sixth season of The Apprentice kicks off on NBC. You probably already knew that, because the past couple of weeks have been rife with reports of Donald Trump's bizarre feud with Rosie O'Donnell, and those reports all seem to mention the show. This season, the contestants will be in Los Angeles instead of New York, but they'll still be competing in creative, business-based challenges to become Trump's (supposed)
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,sun reporter | April 26, 2007
By any conventional measure, Rosie O'Donnell does not seem like someone who would succeed on television. She doesn't conform with traditional ideas of beauty. She's a lesbian mother of four. She's blunt and fearless and opinionated in a medium where it seems only men can get away with that. She picks fights with Donald Trump. But O'Donnell's announcement yesterday that she's leaving the daytime gabfest The View after less than a year as a co-host left many fans shocked and in tears. Executives at ABC, which airs the program, also had reason to cry: Since O'Donnell joined the show in September, viewership of The View is up 17 percent, to 3.5 million.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN REPORTER | April 3, 2007
Why are we drawn to celebrity? Our attraction probably dates to prehistoric times and it's probably in our DNA, experts say - a combination of our instinctual needs for (a) something to worship and (b) something to gossip about. When cavemen sitting around a fire first singled out another caveman for discussion - perhaps "Grok," maybe because he could throw a rock farther than anyone else - they found both a common bond and the kind of vicarious thrill that their descendants would continue to relish thousands of years later, as they dissected American Idol contestants around the office water cooler.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,sun television critic | March 10, 2007
Rosie O'Donnell hung upside down by her legs from a yoga swing. She confessed to hiding in her room with the lights out and not going out for days at a time. She told viewers how she couldn't stop crying. The 44-year-old comedian has said and done her share of silly things since joining ABC's The View in September, but yesterday, she was nothing short of brilliant as co-host of a special edition of the morning talk show that focused on women and depression. When O'Donnell is on her game, she uses her personal history - from her battles with the scale to her sexual orientation - as effectively as any performer in popular culture to create enlightening entertainment.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 28, 2007
Rosie O'Donnell has made quite a splash since joining ABC's daytime talk show, The View. Scarcely a week goes by in which the actor/comedian doesn't ignite a firestorm of controversy -- typically by loudly attacking one or another public figure. Last week was quieter than usual: All she did was use ABC's airwaves to call for the impeachment of President George W. Bush. But in the preceding week, O'Donnell, who joined the talk show in September, was busier. She suggested that American Idol judge Paula Abdul was drunk while on the air and harshly attacked all three judges for their treatment of a contestant who was developmentally disabled.
FEATURES
By SARAH KICKLER KELBER | January 6, 2007
Reality TV took a bit of a break for the holidays, but the schedule is heating up again. Tomorrow night at 9:30, the sixth season of The Apprentice kicks off on NBC. You probably already knew that, because the past couple of weeks have been rife with reports of Donald Trump's bizarre feud with Rosie O'Donnell, and those reports all seem to mention the show. This season, the contestants will be in Los Angeles instead of New York, but they'll still be competing in creative, business-based challenges to become Trump's (supposed)
FEATURES
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | January 23, 2006
Every afternoon, a small miracle occurs at the American Visionary Art Museum. That's what director Rebecca Hoffberger told the VIPs who arrived early enough for a whirlwind tour of AVAM's newest exhibit, Race, Class, Gender Do Not Equal Character, before the museum's black-tie 10th-anniversary gala got started Saturday night. On one wall hung dozens of tiny quilts, each created by black South African women in the days after apartheid ended. Across the room was a wire-and-mirror portrait of Nelson Mandela, who helped bring that horror to an end. Every day about 2:30, Hoffberger said, sunlight streaming through a window falls on Mandela's face and reflects directly onto the tapestries.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1996
Face constantly pressed up against a window, eyes always observing, pen frantically staining her beloved notebook, Harriet the 007 of the sixth grade, without the international intrigue and Scandinavian sirens."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1996
Do we really need another talk show on daytime TV? At least one comedian thinks so."The Rosie O'Donnell Show" (10 a.m.-11 a.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- If talk shows are dead (and they certainly appear to be at least sick, judging by the number of casualties over the past year), what makes Rosie O'Donnell think she can survive? See if you develop any insights why during this debut show featuring George Clooney and Susan Lucci. ABC."Star Trek: Voyager" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54) -- A crew member is killed during a science experiment but is reborn as a vengeful amphibian.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 6, 2004
NEW YORK - Maybe Martha Stewart should have testified in her own defense. Maybe her lawyer should have presented more than one witness. Maybe, as a former stockbroker, Stewart should have known and abided by the rules. And then maybe Chappell Hartridge would have been able to return to his job still on good terms with a certain colleague. "Don't come back to work if you convict her," Hartridge quoted a co-worker as joking to him. Hartridge, 47, was the only member of Stewart's jury who agreed to speak to the news media after yesterday's verdict was announced.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 17, 2002
Two months after its Broadway opening, the musical Hairspray is doing so well, producer Margo Lion kids, "I can't wait to do it on ice!" Playing to standing-room-only audiences, the show is grossing about $1 million a week, according to Lion. Investors who were smart enough to put money into the musical have reason to hold their bouffants extra high. They've already received 20 percent of their investment back, and Lion said they can expect to recoup fully by late spring or early summer.
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