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NEWS
May 24, 2010
For the sake of your readers and the residents of Baltimore County, we are writing to clarify some issues following your story about the Rosewood Center ("Rosewood Future Clouded," May 19). The state is working diligently to transition this surplus property in a timely fashion to accommodate the future development plans of Stevenson University. This is believed to be in keeping with the community's vision of its best use. This transition remains on track and is still moving as quickly as any other sizable and important real estate purchase.
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HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
Perched on a wooded bluff in rural southeastern Carroll County, the old Henryton State Hospital bears silent witness to the ravages of decades of neglect and vandalism. First opened in 1923, the 18-building complex that once housed the sick and handicapped now appears beyond hope of recovery itself. Windows gape. Trees reach to the sky through roofs that have caved in or burned. Graffiti and vines cover stucco and brick walls. Broken glass and beer cans litter the ground, along with debris from the crumbling structures.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare | mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 11, 2010
The state Board of Public Works has declared the Rosewood Center in northwestern Baltimore County surplus and made the 178-acre property available to prospective buyers. Stevenson University, whose Owings Mills campus adjoins Rosewood, has expressed interest in the former state hospital property, which offers vast green space ideally suited for the college's growing athletic programs and a few newer buildings that could be used for its school of education. "Making the property surplus is a great first step for us and allows us to begin negotiations with the state," said Tim Campbell, Stevenson's chief financial officer.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Baltimore police did not have permission to conduct training exercises at the shuttered state facility for the developmentally disabled where an officer was shot and critically wounded, according to Maryland health officials. "As far as we can tell, there were not requests made by the city Police Department to use the facility for training," said Dori Henry, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. "We're looking into how they came to be there. " Police have not disclosed details of their internal investigation into the incident at the former Rosewood Center in Owings Mills, but Anthony Guglielmi, chief spokesman for the Baltimore department, acknowledged that police have known that the use of the building was unauthorized.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2009
An independent Jewish high school in Baltimore has announced plans to relocate its campus to the grounds of the former Rosewood Center in Owings Mills. The Shoshana S. Cardin School for students in grades nine through 12 will purchase 55 acres of the property in Owings Mills from The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore, which had abandoned its development concept for the site. School officials declined to make public the purchase price until the sale is settled.
NEWS
October 28, 2009
On October 24, 2009, KIMBERLY ANN MEAHL, a long time resident of Rosewood Center. She is survived by her mother E. Carole Morsberger; her late father Charles L. Meahl; sister Cheryl Bosley and her husband Tom; brother Stanley L. Morsberger and his wife Stephanie; nieces Cassandra Bosley and Carolyn Bosley; aunts Susan and Leonard DiGiacomo, Barbara and John White; grandmother Millie Meahl; and numerous cousins. Memorial Service private. Contributions can be made to The ARC of Maryland, 49 Old Solomons Island Road #205, Annapolis, MD 21401.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2010
Stevenson University sees the former Rosewood Center in Owings Mills as part of its future — but first, university officials want to hear more about the hazardous residue of Rosewood's past. The land and buildings that housed the state institution for the developmentally disabled contain asbestos, lead, PCBs, concentrations of toxic chemicals from coal ash dumping, and leaking oil tanks. Exactly how much hazardous material, where it is, whether it has to be removed and what a cleanup would cost remain unknown.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | January 11, 2010
The state Board of Public Works has declared the Rosewood Center in northwestern Baltimore County surplus and made the 178-acre property available to prospective buyers. Stevenson University, whose Owings Mills campus adjoins Rosewood, has expressed interest in the former state hospital property, which offers vast green space ideally suited for the college's growing athletic programs and a few newer buildings that could be used for its school of education. "Making the property surplus is a great first step for us and allows us to begin negotiations with the state," said Tim Campbell, Stevenson's chief financial officer.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 24, 2009
Lorraine M. Sheehan, a tenacious disability rights advocate who served in the General Assembly and had been Maryland's secretary of state, died of pneumonia complicated by cystic fibrosis Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Edgewater resident was 72. Family members said that Ms. Sheehan resolved to become involved in defending the rights of the disabled after physicians advised her to place a son diagnosed with autism and retardation in an institution. Years later, she fought successfully to close the Rosewood Center, a hospital for the severely disabled; the facility in Owings Mills closed in June.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2010
Stevenson University has launched an environmental study of the former Rosewood Center in Owings Mills, the next step in evaluating contamination at the state-owned land where the school hopes to expand its campus. The school has hired Urban Green Environmental LLC of Baltimore to conduct a second study meant to figure out more precisely the extent of contamination found in a state study last summer and fall, said a spokeswoman, Glenda LeGendre. In that study, Arc EnvironmentSal Inc. researched historical records and inspected the former institution for mentally disabled people.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
Stevenson University has bought the Shire Pharmaceuticals plant next door to its Owings Mills campus, a $10.5 million deal that a school official said will expand the grounds by a third and help meet the goal of increasing full-time student enrollment to 4,000 in the next two years. "It was just a great opportunity we couldn't pass up," Tim Campbell, Stevenson's executive vice president for financial affairs and chief financial officer, said of the sale that closed Tuesday, expanding the campus in northwestern Baltimore County from 74 to 102 acres.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2010
An open seat on the Baltimore County Council in District 2 has lured six Democrats into the primary contest who are focusing their campaigns on economic development, the Rosewood Center property, budget management and the public's role in land-use decisions. Longtime community activist and former state Senate staffer Vicki Almond, Pikesville Chamber of Commerce executive director Sherrie Becker, retired businessman Albert M. Harris, former state Del. Theodore Levin, public finance lawyer Timmy Ruppersberger and activist Alan P. Zukerberg are hoping to face Republican Jon M. Herbst in the general election.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2010
Stevenson University has launched an environmental study of the former Rosewood Center in Owings Mills, the next step in evaluating contamination at the state-owned land where the school hopes to expand its campus. The school has hired Urban Green Environmental LLC of Baltimore to conduct a second study meant to figure out more precisely the extent of contamination found in a state study last summer and fall, said a spokeswoman, Glenda LeGendre. In that study, Arc EnvironmentSal Inc. researched historical records and inspected the former institution for mentally disabled people.
NEWS
May 24, 2010
For the sake of your readers and the residents of Baltimore County, we are writing to clarify some issues following your story about the Rosewood Center ("Rosewood Future Clouded," May 19). The state is working diligently to transition this surplus property in a timely fashion to accommodate the future development plans of Stevenson University. This is believed to be in keeping with the community's vision of its best use. This transition remains on track and is still moving as quickly as any other sizable and important real estate purchase.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2010
Stevenson University sees the former Rosewood Center in Owings Mills as part of its future — but first, university officials want to hear more about the hazardous residue of Rosewood's past. The land and buildings that housed the state institution for the developmentally disabled contain asbestos, lead, PCBs, concentrations of toxic chemicals from coal ash dumping, and leaking oil tanks. Exactly how much hazardous material, where it is, whether it has to be removed and what a cleanup would cost remain unknown.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | February 12, 2010
The Shoshana S. Cardin School has abandoned plans to move to the former Rosewood Center in Owings Mills next fall but will leave open its option to move to another portion of the site. "It's very, very disappointing," said Shoshana S. Cardin, co-founder of Baltimore's only independent Jewish high school, where 56 students are now enrolled. "We were on a high. Parents, students, faculty, we were on a high that we'd have our own building and be in there in September." Barbie Prince, the head of the school, said Thursday that school officials made the decision after looking at a preliminary environmental study of 55 acres, now owned by The Associated: Jewish Federation of Baltimore, that the school had a contract to buy, contingent on the outcome of the study.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | January 11, 2010
The state Board of Public Works has declared the Rosewood Center in northwestern Baltimore County surplus and made the 178-acre property available to prospective buyers. Stevenson University, whose Owings Mills campus adjoins Rosewood, has expressed interest in the former state hospital property, which offers vast green space ideally suited for the college's growing athletic programs and a few newer buildings that could be used for its school of education. "Making the property surplus is a great first step for us and allows us to begin negotiations with the state," said Tim Campbell, Stevenson's chief financial officer.
BUSINESS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2010
The state Board of Public Works has declared the Rosewood Center in northwestern Baltimore County surplus and made the 178-acre property available to prospective buyers. Stevenson University, whose Owings Mills campus adjoins Rosewood, has expressed interest in the former state hospital property, which offers vast green space ideally suited for the college's growing athletic programs and a few newer buildings that could be used for its school of education. "Making the property surplus is a great first step for us and allows us to begin negotiations with the state," said Tim Campbell, Stevenson's chief financial officer.
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