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NEWS
February 2, 2007
Maryland's troubled Rosewood Center is back in the spotlight. This time, state regulators are warning that the Owings Mills facility's Medicaid funding could be terminated if corrective action is not taken in the next eight days. That couldn't have been too much of a shock. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has been warned about patient-on-patient violence and substandard conditions there for years. With nearly 200 residents, Rosewood remains the state's largest residential treatment facility for the severely developmentally disabled.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tionah Lee and For The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
When we left the Liars, we found out that Ezra was A. Caleb had a mission in Ravenswood that required him to stay, Toby was on a mission to figure out what really happened to his mother in Radley...oh, and of course, Ali is alive. Standing in a mysterious crypt, the girls are trying to make sense of Ali's “death” (and keep the peace). At last, it isn't Spencer playing Nancy Drew and creating theories as to the greatest mystery of all time, but Hana. According to Hana's theory, the body that was extracted then buried, then found, then buried again didn't belong to Ali, but to another girl.
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NEWS
January 21, 2008
In choosing to close the Rosewood Center, the troubled state residential center for the developmentally disabled, Gov. Martin O'Malley made the right call, but the decision does not by itself solve the problem. The real challenge is to find better care for Rosewood's 150 or so residents. Deciding to shut the place down in 18 months is simply the first step in that process. It's clear the Owings Mills facility has been operating at an unacceptable level for far too long. Deteriorating housing, unsafe conditions, patient-on-patient violence and substandard medical care were among the more common complaints detailed by numerous state inspections.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Baltimore police did not have permission to conduct training exercises at the shuttered state facility for the developmentally disabled where an officer was shot and critically wounded, according to Maryland health officials. "As far as we can tell, there were not requests made by the city Police Department to use the facility for training," said Dori Henry, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. "We're looking into how they came to be there. " Police have not disclosed details of their internal investigation into the incident at the former Rosewood Center in Owings Mills, but Anthony Guglielmi, chief spokesman for the Baltimore department, acknowledged that police have known that the use of the building was unauthorized.
NEWS
September 26, 2007
The latest news out of the Rosewood Center in Owings Mills is depressingly familiar: grim and unsafe conditions, substandard medical care, neglect, inaccurate records and more, according to the most recent inspection. Maryland Health and Mental Hygiene Secretary John M. Colmers says the numerous shortcomings at the state residential facility for the developmentally disabled are "completely unacceptable" - and he's right. Even if Mr. Colmers and Gov. Martin O'Malley can't yet commit to shutting the facility down, Rosewood ought to be better than this.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | December 15, 1992
The Sykesville Town Council is unanimously opposed to the transfer of patients from Rosewood Center to Springfield Hospital Center, which is adjacent to the town.In a measure adopted at last night's council meeting, members also voted their opposition to the relocation of the Hickey School for juvenile delinquents to the grounds of Springfield.Mayor Lloyd R. Helt Jr. said he hopes the vote will send a message to the state."I am not assured that the state will tell us anything unless we make a loud noise," said Mayor Helt.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin | November 26, 2007
About 20 female residents of a building at the Rosewood Center in Owings Mills were displaced last night after a single-alarm fire, apparently intentionally set by a developmentally disabled resident, Baltimore County fire officials said. No one was injured, and all of the women were evacuated to a nearby building, said Baltimore County Fire Division Chief Michael Robinson. The fire was reported about 8:45 p.m. after alarms went off, he said. It destroyed the room of the woman who is thought to have started the fire and caused smoke damage elsewhere in the building, he said.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | December 19, 2007
The latest in a string of reports describing serious problems at Owings Mills' Rosewood Center may lead the state to close the long-troubled institution for the developmentally disabled, key lawmakers said yesterday. A report released this month by the state's Office of Health Care Quality detailed numerous findings of neglectful and potentially dangerous treatment of some of the facility's 165 mentally retarded residents and a general failure to comply with federal and state standards of appropriate care.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | January 18, 1993
State Sen. Janice Piccinini of Baltimore County says Gov. William Donald Schaefer has assured her that the Rosewood Center in Owings Mills will not be the permanent home for court-committed, potentially violent, mentally retarded individuals.After meeting with Mr. Schaefer Friday, Senator Piccinini said, "I got the absolute answer I wanted . . . assurance from the governor that it is not the goal of the state to house patients with violent behavior at the Rosewood Center.""I'm trying to be reasonable," Senator Piccinini said.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday | February 21, 1998
Director John Singleton's "Rosewood" (8 p.m.-10: 30 p.m., HBO) is a breathtaking story of the tragic events in Rosewood, Fla. in 1923, when a black, economically flourishing town of Rosewood was attacked by neighboring poor whites. All but a handful of the townsfolk were killed, and one house was left standing. Even more chilling was the fact that no one spoke of the massacre for 60 years.Singleton does a good job showing the mounting hysteria of those few days. And he gets good performances from Esther Rolle, Don Cheadle and Jon Voight as a white shop owner whose relationship to the people of Rosewood is drawn with realistic ambiguity.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2010
An open seat on the Baltimore County Council in District 2 has lured six Democrats into the primary contest who are focusing their campaigns on economic development, the Rosewood Center property, budget management and the public's role in land-use decisions. Longtime community activist and former state Senate staffer Vicki Almond, Pikesville Chamber of Commerce executive director Sherrie Becker, retired businessman Albert M. Harris, former state Del. Theodore Levin, public finance lawyer Timmy Ruppersberger and activist Alan P. Zukerberg are hoping to face Republican Jon M. Herbst in the general election.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2010
Stevenson University has launched an environmental study of the former Rosewood Center in Owings Mills, the next step in evaluating contamination at the state-owned land where the school hopes to expand its campus. The school has hired Urban Green Environmental LLC of Baltimore to conduct a second study meant to figure out more precisely the extent of contamination found in a state study last summer and fall, said a spokeswoman, Glenda LeGendre. In that study, Arc EnvironmentSal Inc. researched historical records and inspected the former institution for mentally disabled people.
NEWS
May 24, 2010
For the sake of your readers and the residents of Baltimore County, we are writing to clarify some issues following your story about the Rosewood Center ("Rosewood Future Clouded," May 19). The state is working diligently to transition this surplus property in a timely fashion to accommodate the future development plans of Stevenson University. This is believed to be in keeping with the community's vision of its best use. This transition remains on track and is still moving as quickly as any other sizable and important real estate purchase.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2010
Stevenson University sees the former Rosewood Center in Owings Mills as part of its future — but first, university officials want to hear more about the hazardous residue of Rosewood's past. The land and buildings that housed the state institution for the developmentally disabled contain asbestos, lead, PCBs, concentrations of toxic chemicals from coal ash dumping, and leaking oil tanks. Exactly how much hazardous material, where it is, whether it has to be removed and what a cleanup would cost remain unknown.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | January 11, 2010
The state Board of Public Works has declared the Rosewood Center in northwestern Baltimore County surplus and made the 178-acre property available to prospective buyers. Stevenson University, whose Owings Mills campus adjoins Rosewood, has expressed interest in the former state hospital property, which offers vast green space ideally suited for the college's growing athletic programs and a few newer buildings that could be used for its school of education. "Making the property surplus is a great first step for us and allows us to begin negotiations with the state," said Tim Campbell, Stevenson's chief financial officer.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare | mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 11, 2010
The state Board of Public Works has declared the Rosewood Center in northwestern Baltimore County surplus and made the 178-acre property available to prospective buyers. Stevenson University, whose Owings Mills campus adjoins Rosewood, has expressed interest in the former state hospital property, which offers vast green space ideally suited for the college's growing athletic programs and a few newer buildings that could be used for its school of education. "Making the property surplus is a great first step for us and allows us to begin negotiations with the state," said Tim Campbell, Stevenson's chief financial officer.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin | March 9, 2009
A fire last night at a vacant building on the campus of the Rosewood Center in Owings Mills destroyed that building, and embers from the fire burned part of an adjacent vacant structure, a spokesman for the Baltimore County Fire Department said. Fire Director Kyrle Preis, the spokesman, said that because the two-story brick building was slated for demolition, the officer in charge at the scene ordered firefighters to let it burn rather than endanger the lives of firefighters. "It was declared a control burn," Preis said.
NEWS
By Staff Report | October 5, 1993
State and county officials yesterday dedicated three buildings on the grounds of Rosewood State Hospital that will be used to provide transitional housing, vocational training and day care for the homeless.The complex will be in full operation this month, said a spokeswoman for County Executive Roger B. Hayden.Gov. William Donald Schaefer presented a citation to Willard Hackerman, president of Whiting-Turner Contracting Co., who donated $450,000 to the project and more than $1 million to other homeless programs.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2009
An independent Jewish high school in Baltimore has announced plans to relocate its campus to the grounds of the former Rosewood Center in Owings Mills. The Shoshana S. Cardin School for students in grades nine through 12 will purchase 55 acres of the property in Owings Mills from The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore, which had abandoned its development concept for the site. School officials declined to make public the purchase price until the sale is settled.
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