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NEWS
November 10, 2004
On November 9, 2004, HENRY ROSENZWEIG, beloved brother of the late Morris Rosenzweig, devoted brother-in-law of Shirley Rosenzweig, loving Uncle of Mindy Rosenzweig, Abby Richmond and Alvin Rosenzweig, loving great-Uncle of Melissa and Ryan Richmond, loving great great Uncle of Marissa Brady. Services private at the convenience of the family. Interment Mogan Abraham Congregation Cemetery, Rosedale. Please omit flowers. Arrangements by SOLLEVINSON & BROS., INC.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
Harry L. Rosenzweig, an influential mathematics professor who had been chairman of the math department at McDaniel College, died Friday of pancreatic cancer at his Westminster home. He was 72. "Harry was very popular with math majors and, in general, anyone who took a course with him and was willing to work hard had a very positive experience," said Robert P. Boner, a colleague who taught math at what is now McDaniel College for 37 years before retiring in 2007. "He was a demanding teacher but was also was very helpful outside of the classroom with both help and advice," said Dr. Boner.
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NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1999
Janice Popick Rosenzweig, an attorney who specialized in health law, died Monday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center of an infection stemming from treatment of primary pulmonary hypertension. She was 49 and lived in Brooklandville.Born in Baltimore, Mrs. Rosenzweig graduated in 1968 from Woodlawn High School. She received her bachelor's degree in psychology in 1972 from Brandeis University. She planned to attend medical school but married Richard Pearlstein. The couple had a daughter, Rachel Pearlstein, before divorcing.
NEWS
April 1, 2008
On March 29, 2008, ALVIN ROSENZWEIG, loving husband of Phyllis Rosenzweig(nee Glick); beloved father of Deborah Rosenzweig, Stuart Rosenzweig, and Jan Stewart all of Baltimore, MD; Father-in-law of James Williams and George Stewart; loving brother of Anita Rosenstadt of Silver Spring, MD; adored grandfather Michael Dexter, Ryan Peters, Matthew Stewart, Steven Rosenzweig and Jonathon Stewart; loving great-grandfather of Kayla, Jane, Caroline and Kate Dexter....
NEWS
April 4, 1993
A 10-year-old boy remained hospitalized yesterday for injuries he suffered when he rode his bicycle into a moving car Friday in the Greens development in Westminster.City police said Marion Rouse was riding his bicycle on Glenbrook Court about 4:20 p.m. when he failed to obey a stop sign and collided with a car driven by Stuart B. Rosenzweig, 38, of Westminster.Mr. Rosenzweig was traveling south on Glenbrook Drive and approaching Glenbrook Court when the accident occurred, police said.Police also said that no charges will be filed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | June 20, 1996
"AlumNine," at Baltimore Life, brings together nine artists who have been graduates of the Maryland Institute, College of Art over a period of 60 years, from Amalie Rothschild in 1934 to Sarah Tuttle Upson in 1993.Selected by Carla Heider Rosenzweig (1973), the show includes works by Frank Hyder (1972), now of Philadelphia; Susan Gold (1968) of Windsor, Ontario; and Upson of Providence, R.I., as well as Rosenzweig herself, who lives in Brooklin, Maine. There are works in painting, sculpture, installation, drawing and handmade paper.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,TV Critic | March 25, 1992
Washington -- Call it Rosie O'Neill goes to Washington.More elaborate efforts may have been made to save a TV show from cancellation, but surely none has been as public as the campaign by Sharon Gless and her husband, Barney Rosenzweig, to save "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill," which has been on "hiatus" and out of production since December.Last night, the Gless-Rosenzweig save-our-show bandwagon rolled into Washington, where some very high-profile women in law and politics climbed aboard."Personally, I'm a little angry and tired of asking people to support my work," Gless said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elsbeth L. Bothe and By Elsbeth L. Bothe,Special to the Sun | July 15, 2001
A Cold Case, by Philip Gourevitch. Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 182 pages, $22. New Yorker staff writer Philip Gourevitch, whose first book was a provocative account of the 1994 massacre of 800,000 people during 100 days of genocide in Rwanda, now probes an obscure New York double homicide focusing on the fact that it took 30 years to bring one evildoer to nebulous justice. Lightly switched from the monstrous to the minuscule, Gourevitch's keen insights and skillful reporting continue to captivate.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | December 19, 1991
These are trying times for fans of "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill," who are in for some unpleasant surprises tonight. For one thing, the much-promoted start of a romance between Rosie (Sharon Gless) and a character portrayed by Robert Wagner will not air. Instead, viewers will find a rerun of last season's Christmas show -- the one in which Rosie defends an elf.Much worse, tonight all but marks the end of the line for "Rosie." Though the official word from CBS is that the show will be placed "on hiatus" and could return in March after the Winter Olympics, executive producer Barney Rosenzweig told The Sun this week that the program is shutting down production.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elsbeth L. Bothe and By Elsbeth L. Bothe,Special to the Sun | July 15, 2001
A Cold Case, by Philip Gourevitch. Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 182 pages, $22. New Yorker staff writer Philip Gourevitch, whose first book was a provocative account of the 1994 massacre of 800,000 people during 100 days of genocide in Rwanda, now probes an obscure New York double homicide focusing on the fact that it took 30 years to bring one evildoer to nebulous justice. Lightly switched from the monstrous to the minuscule, Gourevitch's keen insights and skillful reporting continue to captivate.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1999
Janice Popick Rosenzweig, an attorney who specialized in health law, died Monday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center of an infection stemming from treatment of primary pulmonary hypertension. She was 49 and lived in Brooklandville.Born in Baltimore, Mrs. Rosenzweig graduated in 1968 from Woodlawn High School. She received her bachelor's degree in psychology in 1972 from Brandeis University. She planned to attend medical school but married Richard Pearlstein. The couple had a daughter, Rachel Pearlstein, before divorcing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | June 20, 1996
"AlumNine," at Baltimore Life, brings together nine artists who have been graduates of the Maryland Institute, College of Art over a period of 60 years, from Amalie Rothschild in 1934 to Sarah Tuttle Upson in 1993.Selected by Carla Heider Rosenzweig (1973), the show includes works by Frank Hyder (1972), now of Philadelphia; Susan Gold (1968) of Windsor, Ontario; and Upson of Providence, R.I., as well as Rosenzweig herself, who lives in Brooklin, Maine. There are works in painting, sculpture, installation, drawing and handmade paper.
NEWS
April 4, 1993
A 10-year-old boy remained hospitalized yesterday for injuries he suffered when he rode his bicycle into a moving car Friday in the Greens development in Westminster.City police said Marion Rouse was riding his bicycle on Glenbrook Court about 4:20 p.m. when he failed to obey a stop sign and collided with a car driven by Stuart B. Rosenzweig, 38, of Westminster.Mr. Rosenzweig was traveling south on Glenbrook Drive and approaching Glenbrook Court when the accident occurred, police said.Police also said that no charges will be filed.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,TV Critic | March 25, 1992
Washington -- Call it Rosie O'Neill goes to Washington.More elaborate efforts may have been made to save a TV show from cancellation, but surely none has been as public as the campaign by Sharon Gless and her husband, Barney Rosenzweig, to save "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill," which has been on "hiatus" and out of production since December.Last night, the Gless-Rosenzweig save-our-show bandwagon rolled into Washington, where some very high-profile women in law and politics climbed aboard."Personally, I'm a little angry and tired of asking people to support my work," Gless said.
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