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By Robert Haskins | January 29, 1991
The elusive -- indeed, perhaps the illusory -- boundary separating architecture and art is central to the aesthetic of Baltimore artist Tim Thompson, who has built a new installation on display at Goucher College's Rosenberg Gallery through March 3.Commissioned by the college in honor of the new Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Arts Center, Mr. Thompson's installation is a series of four walls covered with a corrugated fiberglass. These are positioned to create the illusion that they bisect the asymmetrical walls of the gallery, inviting myriad contemplations of the relationships between the installation and the space it inhabits.
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By Sarah Schaffer | October 30, 2003
Young and old alike Generations of creativity are featured in Golden Blessings of Old Age and Out of the Mouths of Babes, two exhibits at the American Visionary Art Museum. The more than 250 works by 50 artists include sculptures, paintings and drawings by senior artists and works by children who have experienced abuse, illness, war and hunger. The exhibit will run through Sept. 4. Admission is $9 for adults and $6 for seniors, students and children. The American Visionary Art Museum is at 800 Key Highway.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | March 26, 1998
"Space Divided by 3" at Goucher College's Rosenberg Gallery is devoted to the work of three members of Goucher's art faculty: sculptor Stuart Abarbanel, installation artist Allyn Massey and photographer Ed Worteck. The show groups these artists not only because of their status as faculty members but also because their work has something in common: a concern with making the media in which they work a noticeable part of the art. Abarbanel leaves chisel and pencil marks on the wood he sculpts.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | November 17, 1998
The retrospective of Barry Nemett's work now appearing at Goucher shows clearly what this artist does best.It reaches back to the late 1960s and encompasses more than 100 works, the vast majority of which are small- to medium-scale. Most are drawings and gouaches (a form of watercolor) of birds, animals, trees, books and the like. They reveal a superb draftsman, a colorist of nuance and subtlety, a lover of nature and books who can make them sing with that love in works such as "Couple" (two books)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer | October 30, 2003
Young and old alike Generations of creativity are featured in Golden Blessings of Old Age and Out of the Mouths of Babes, two exhibits at the American Visionary Art Museum. The more than 250 works by 50 artists include sculptures, paintings and drawings by senior artists and works by children who have experienced abuse, illness, war and hunger. The exhibit will run through Sept. 4. Admission is $9 for adults and $6 for seniors, students and children. The American Visionary Art Museum is at 800 Key Highway.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | January 29, 1998
Eloise Hampton Wilson, who died in 1994, was an artist and illustrator whose prints of working people appeared in the New Yorker in the 1930s. A native of Pennsylvania, she moved to Harford County in 1933 and became prominent on the local cultural scene, serving on the board of trustees of the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Harford County Board of Library Trustees. It was only after she died that her art works of the 1930s were found at her home. Photographer Susan Tobin, a friend of Wilson's, and Helen Glazer, Goucher College's exhibitions director, have co-curated an exhibit of Wilson's work that appears at the college's Rosenberg Gallery.
FEATURES
By Robert Haskins | September 9, 1991
Sculptures created by six Baltimore artists from a wide variety of materials make for mixed impressions in the exhibition "Shaping Space" at Goucher College's Rosenberg Gallery.The most remarkable works poetically exploit disparate, even contradictory, materials. In Scott T. Pina's "Denial," for instance, rough-hewn lumber is wrapped tightly in plastic with an imposing shape of sculpted steel around the wood, producing a dramatic effect.No less compelling is D. Scott Cahlander's "Table Abstraction" in which an uneven, rectangular slab of concrete forms the base for a table-like shape.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | February 13, 1992
There's no telling how art will reach the individual viewer, something this individual viewer was reminded of by the current exhibit at Goucher College's Rosenberg Gallery, "Seeking through the Medium of Paper: Works by E. H. Sorrells-Adewale."One of the strengths of this gallery's programming is the essays exhibitions director Helen Glazer writes to accompany the shows there.Mrs. Glazer's essays always throw light on the art at hand, and the current one is no exception.Mr. Sorrells-Adewale's collage works of paper and other materials contain a rich iconography drawn from Western, African and Afro-Brazilian art.He uses what Ms. Glazer calls "a set of symbols" to reach "other levels of meaning in existence."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 11, 1992
There have been so many social-issue shows lately, with subject matter as wide-ranging as politics, drugs, the environment, terrorism and gender stereotypes, that they threaten to become a little wearing; the gallery-goer may begin to approach them with a certain amount of "cause" fatigue.Surprise: "Woman as Protagonist," just opened at Goucher College's Rosenberg Gallery, is less of a cause show, at least in a sociopolitical sense, than it may sound. One could certainly put together a strong show that advocates a specific agenda, such as pro-choice, equal opportunity, etc., but this is not it.The works here are not primarily calls to action.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | November 17, 1998
The retrospective of Barry Nemett's work now appearing at Goucher shows clearly what this artist does best.It reaches back to the late 1960s and encompasses more than 100 works, the vast majority of which are small- to medium-scale. Most are drawings and gouaches (a form of watercolor) of birds, animals, trees, books and the like. They reveal a superb draftsman, a colorist of nuance and subtlety, a lover of nature and books who can make them sing with that love in works such as "Couple" (two books)
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | March 26, 1998
"Space Divided by 3" at Goucher College's Rosenberg Gallery is devoted to the work of three members of Goucher's art faculty: sculptor Stuart Abarbanel, installation artist Allyn Massey and photographer Ed Worteck. The show groups these artists not only because of their status as faculty members but also because their work has something in common: a concern with making the media in which they work a noticeable part of the art. Abarbanel leaves chisel and pencil marks on the wood he sculpts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | January 29, 1998
Eloise Hampton Wilson, who died in 1994, was an artist and illustrator whose prints of working people appeared in the New Yorker in the 1930s. A native of Pennsylvania, she moved to Harford County in 1933 and became prominent on the local cultural scene, serving on the board of trustees of the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Harford County Board of Library Trustees. It was only after she died that her art works of the 1930s were found at her home. Photographer Susan Tobin, a friend of Wilson's, and Helen Glazer, Goucher College's exhibitions director, have co-curated an exhibit of Wilson's work that appears at the college's Rosenberg Gallery.
NEWS
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 13, 1997
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra received a $100,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts for its "Arts Excel" education partnership project.As part of the program, BSO musicians have been assisting teachers in city and Baltimore County Schools, bringing music and the arts to the classroom to develop thinking skills in language arts, social studies, science, history and math. The program is also designed to enrich the educational environment, encourage parental involvement and to help improve academic achievement and attendance.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 11, 1992
There have been so many social-issue shows lately, with subject matter as wide-ranging as politics, drugs, the environment, terrorism and gender stereotypes, that they threaten to become a little wearing; the gallery-goer may begin to approach them with a certain amount of "cause" fatigue.Surprise: "Woman as Protagonist," just opened at Goucher College's Rosenberg Gallery, is less of a cause show, at least in a sociopolitical sense, than it may sound. One could certainly put together a strong show that advocates a specific agenda, such as pro-choice, equal opportunity, etc., but this is not it.The works here are not primarily calls to action.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | February 13, 1992
There's no telling how art will reach the individual viewer, something this individual viewer was reminded of by the current exhibit at Goucher College's Rosenberg Gallery, "Seeking through the Medium of Paper: Works by E. H. Sorrells-Adewale."One of the strengths of this gallery's programming is the essays exhibitions director Helen Glazer writes to accompany the shows there.Mrs. Glazer's essays always throw light on the art at hand, and the current one is no exception.Mr. Sorrells-Adewale's collage works of paper and other materials contain a rich iconography drawn from Western, African and Afro-Brazilian art.He uses what Ms. Glazer calls "a set of symbols" to reach "other levels of meaning in existence."
FEATURES
By Robert Haskins | September 9, 1991
Sculptures created by six Baltimore artists from a wide variety of materials make for mixed impressions in the exhibition "Shaping Space" at Goucher College's Rosenberg Gallery.The most remarkable works poetically exploit disparate, even contradictory, materials. In Scott T. Pina's "Denial," for instance, rough-hewn lumber is wrapped tightly in plastic with an imposing shape of sculpted steel around the wood, producing a dramatic effect.No less compelling is D. Scott Cahlander's "Table Abstraction" in which an uneven, rectangular slab of concrete forms the base for a table-like shape.
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