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By Ellen Warren and Ellen Warren,Knight-Ridder | October 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- "Where was Michael?" was the big question in the White House Rose Garden yesterday. Or, to put it more bluntly, how come Air Jordan stiffed the president of the United States?How come one of the best known professional athletes in the world didn't show up to meet one of the world's best known amateurs? Where was the most famous Chicago Bull when President Bush honored the NBA champions? Good question.No one would say exactly why Michael Jordan didn't come to the party, but this much is known: A lot of people, big shots and little shots alike, were crushed.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | October 28, 2013
Last week, MSNBC's Mika Brzezinski tried to call the HealthCare.gov helpline and got an operator. That's right: an operator! The call went through! MSNBC, the unofficial AV department of the Democratic Party, had a scoop. The network tweeted out the big news along with a link to the video: "Mika called the Obamacare hotline and got through with no problems -- right on air. WATCH. " It's a sure sign that the bar has been lowered to curb height when spinners are touting the exciting news that phone calls actually go through.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau Staff writer Kim Clark contributed to this article | April 14, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The White House showed yesterday how a stale bit of information with modest impact could be parlayed into national headlines, a prime spot on the network news and two days of positive publicity for a president who has been feeling ignored.It's the Rose Garden strategy, George Bush style, and a classic example of creating news where there really isn't any."We got our own spin out there early and two days of news," crowed an exultant White House official. "You can't beat that."
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
Bill Gant says asking him to choose a favorite plant or a favorite season in his garden is like asking him to choose "among my children. " When Gant and his wife, Nancy, bought their home in 2004, the previous owner had created a place for a large flower bed in the side front lawn, but nothing was planted in it. "The garden was a canvas, my trowel awaiting inspiration," says Gant, a Harford County title researcher who writes poetry in his...
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1996
PORTLAND, Ore. -- From a competitive standpoint, one would think that Washington Bullets guard Rod Strickland would be looking forward to playing here tonight against the Portland Trail Blazers, a team that he left bitterly over the summer.But if Strickland had things his way, he wouldn't even be here."If I could catch the next flight to D.C., I would, instead of going [to Portland]," Strickland said. "I'm not looking forward to it at all."Strickland has no idea what kind of reception he'll get tonight at 10 when the Bullets face the Trail Blazers at the Rose Garden.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | March 12, 2000
It looked like a rose garden. It smelled like a rose garden. It ... wasn't a rose garden. Instead, this was the opening night celebration for Art Blooms at the Walters Art Gallery. About 360 guests got first gander at floral arrangements created by the Women's Committee to match the museum's masterpieces. This year, the bouquets were bursting with roses, whose heady scent added further elegance to the evening. Soaking up the atmosphere: Mary Ellen Kaplan and Ellen Richardson, event co-chairs; Missy Adams, Women's Committee chair; Chris Bangs, Laura Freedlander, Adrienne Salomon, Joanne Belgrad and Susie Black, Women's Committee members; Adena Testa, Walters board president; Gary Vikan, museum director; Harriet Griffin, museum docent; George Roche, chairman of T. Rowe Price; and Betty Cooke, jewelry designer.
SPORTS
December 17, 1995
Opponent: Portland Trail BlazersSite: Rose Garden, Portland, Ore.Time: 4 p.m.Radio: WWLG (1360 AM), WTEM (570 AM)Outlook: This is the start of a five-game, weeklong trip for the Bullets, who have had disastrous December road trips in recent years. During two trips out west last season, the Bullets went through an eight-game losing streak and finished the month 3-10 away from home. Three of the games will be against teams with losing records. This will be Washington's first visit to the Rose Garden, which opened this season.
NEWS
November 21, 2012
I think if President Barack Obama proposed a balanced budget in return for taxing the wealthy, a compromise would be attainable. As to Benghazi, either Susan Rice (on the Sunday shows after the ambassador to Libya was killed), or President Obama (in the second debate when he told Mitt Romney to read the transcript of the Rose Garden briefing with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton), is telling a falsehood. Finally, it is impossible to believe that when Gen. David H. Petraeus was being investigated last summer, FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III did not inform Attorney General Eric Holder and that Mr Holder did not let President Obama know.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President Bush has announced that the federal government would begin a nationwide campaign to immunize children against preventable diseases by age 2.Pediatricians and other public health experts said Mr. Bush's proposal was belated and inadequate.Mr. Bush also announced a federal program intended to reduce infant mortality by increasing the number of women who get prenatal care. This program is called Healthy Start, but Democrats derided it as a "late start," saying it was prompted more by the political calendar than by genuine interest in child health problems.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 13, 2001
WASHINGTON -- President Bush stepped out of the Oval Office and into the Rose Garden yesterday afternoon and said the phone calls he had made in the morning were "heartbreaking." For the second time in 63 days, Bush had to telephone the mayor of New York City and the governor of New York. Again, his message was one of sympathy for a shocking loss of life, this time after an American Airlines jetliner crashed into a working class section of Queens with 260 passengers and crew members on board.
NEWS
November 21, 2012
I think if President Barack Obama proposed a balanced budget in return for taxing the wealthy, a compromise would be attainable. As to Benghazi, either Susan Rice (on the Sunday shows after the ambassador to Libya was killed), or President Obama (in the second debate when he told Mitt Romney to read the transcript of the Rose Garden briefing with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton), is telling a falsehood. Finally, it is impossible to believe that when Gen. David H. Petraeus was being investigated last summer, FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III did not inform Attorney General Eric Holder and that Mr Holder did not let President Obama know.
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetishippodromehatter@aol.com | December 8, 2011
I've been thinking about the presents I'll be giving - and getting, I hope - during the holiday season. I have inexpensive expectations, so folks needn't worry about spending a fortune on me. But if they did have fortunes to spend, I think I'd like to receive an immense rose garden, one as extravagant as Josephine's rose garden was at the Chateau Malmaison. When Empress Josephine and Emperor Napoleon ruled France during the early 1800s, Josephine lived at the Malmaison, a three-story chateau situated upon 4,500 acres on the outskirts of Paris.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | October 3, 2006
It has been more than two decades in the planting, but the new National Garden, which can trace its roots to the rose, opened to the public this week in Washington. At the foot of the nation's Capitol, it is actually four separate gardens on 3 acres behind the U.S. Botanic Garden's glass-domed conservatory. It includes a rose garden to honor the national flower, a regional garden featuring the variety of plants that thrive in the Mid-Atlantic climate, a mosaic fountain to honor the nation's first ladies and a butterfly garden, paid for with more than a half-million fundraising dollars from the nation's garden clubs.
NEWS
By NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON and NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 21, 2006
There are rose enthusiasts and rose aficionados, and then there is Donna Beth Joy Shapiro. Shapiro, who has 23 rose varieties stuffed into her Bolton Hill garden, borders on rose fanatic. Good thing, because roses, as thorny and high maintenance as rock stars, demand something close to fanatical devotion. "It takes a particular kind of person to grow roses," Shapiro observes. "You have to love 'em." Shapiro, whose grandparents cultivated a rose garden, has loved 'em from childhood. She dotes on her prickly brood, waiting impatiently for its annual "critical mass" of bloom.
NEWS
November 1, 2004
Hilda Rose Fangman, a nurse and volunteer, died Oct. 25 at St. Elizabeth's Rehabilitation and Nursing Center after a brief illness. A longtime resident of Belair-Edison, she was 100. Born Hilda Rose Franklin in Ipswich, England, she moved with her family to Montreal, Canada, when she was 8 years old. She grew up there, trained as a nurse and developed a passion for golf. Her father, Dr. Charles Franklin, was a chiropractor. As an adult, she frequently visited her sister Winnie Birrane in Baltimore and moved here when she was in her 40s. Ultimately, all three of her siblings settled here.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | November 23, 2003
I DIDN'T THINK that society matrons gardened. I thought they just supervised. And I didn't think the very rich answered their own phones. I thought they had someone to do that, too. That is, until C.Z. Guest picked up the phone somewhere in her vast Old Westbury mansion and answered my gardening questions with the acumen of someone who regularly gets her hands dirty. Guest died earlier this month at the age of 83, and I don't think we will see her like again: the society gardener. I refer not to the hothouse orchid enthusiast nor the lady of the manor who presides over manicured lawns and shrubs, but a woman like Guest, who didn't have to grow the carrots for her horses or the peonies for her tables, but who did. And loved it. It had been just a year since she and her twin set and her briefcase full of gardening slides had lectured in a rain-soaked tent at historic Rainbow Hill in Baltimore County to benefit the Maryland Historical Society.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | October 3, 2006
It has been more than two decades in the planting, but the new National Garden, which can trace its roots to the rose, opened to the public this week in Washington. At the foot of the nation's Capitol, it is actually four separate gardens on 3 acres behind the U.S. Botanic Garden's glass-domed conservatory. It includes a rose garden to honor the national flower, a regional garden featuring the variety of plants that thrive in the Mid-Atlantic climate, a mosaic fountain to honor the nation's first ladies and a butterfly garden, paid for with more than a half-million fundraising dollars from the nation's garden clubs.
NEWS
October 11, 1992
A story in the Carroll County section Sunday should have said that the old-fashioned rose garden at the Farm Museum was started by the museum's volunteers.JAYNE DATTILIO of Westminster has been in charge of the flower beds at the Carroll County Farm Museum for the past 10 years. Each week during the months the museum is open she spends two or three days working in the gardens, designing, planting and maintaining them.She sells tickets during museum events, and when extra help is needed she answers the telephones.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
PORTLAND, Ore. - The Washington Wizards needed something, anything to jump-start their Eastern Conference playoff hopes, and the Rose Garden was the wrong place to find it, having dropped their past three games here, as part of an eight-game overall skid against the Portland Trail Blazers. But the Wizards found the tonic to their usually erratic jump shooting, as they hit 51 percent from the field to notch perhaps their biggest win of the season, 95-91. Point guard Tyronn Lue, inserted into the starting lineup at the last minute, had 21 points, including 10 in the fourth quarter, to pace the Washington attack.
BUSINESS
By Faith Hayden and Faith Hayden,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 29, 2002
PORT TOBACCO - Rose Hill, a mansion overlooking the Port Tobacco River in Charles County, is one of the finest examples of Georgian architecture in Southern Maryland. One of its most illustrious owners was Dr. Gustavus R. Brown, son of the man who built the mansion about 1730. Brown was a friend of George Washington, who visited Rose Hill several times, and was the physician who attended the former president at the time of his death. Today Rose Hill is owned by a couple who also had presidential connections.
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