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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2013
To get the Fourth of July off to a stirring start, I thought you would enjoy this blast from the past, which I only just discovered -- the venerable Rosa Ponselle singing our national anthem. (My thanks to the soprano's longtime friend Elayne Reynolds Duke for alerting me to the performance.) This rare clip, from the 1952 Republican convention in Chicago, finds Ponselle in typically sumptuous voice, not to mention articulating with terrific clarity (people just don't sing like that anymore)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2013
To get the Fourth of July off to a stirring start, I thought you would enjoy this blast from the past, which I only just discovered -- the venerable Rosa Ponselle singing our national anthem. (My thanks to the soprano's longtime friend Elayne Reynolds Duke for alerting me to the performance.) This rare clip, from the 1952 Republican convention in Chicago, finds Ponselle in typically sumptuous voice, not to mention articulating with terrific clarity (people just don't sing like that anymore)
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 18, 2009
Clifford Cole Bruck Sr., a retired Western Maryland Railway executive and longtime opera buff, died Wednesday of complications from Parkinson's disease at the Presbyterian Home of Maryland in Towson. The longtime Guilford resident was 93. Mr. Bruck was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park. After graduating from Forest Park High School in 1932, he earned a bachelor's degree from the Johns Hopkins University in 1936. Mr. Bruck also attended the University of Maryland School of Law at night, earning a degree in the 1960s.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 18, 2009
Clifford Cole Bruck Sr., a retired Western Maryland Railway executive and longtime opera buff, died Wednesday of complications from Parkinson's disease at the Presbyterian Home of Maryland in Towson. The longtime Guilford resident was 93. Mr. Bruck was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park. After graduating from Forest Park High School in 1932, he earned a bachelor's degree from the Johns Hopkins University in 1936. Mr. Bruck also attended the University of Maryland School of Law at night, earning a degree in the 1960s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | May 20, 2001
Twenty years ago this week -- May 25, 1981--- Rosa Ponselle died in her beloved home, Villa Pace, in Greenspring Valley. The soprano had outlived just about all her fellow stars of the "Golden Age" at the Metropolitan Opera in the 1920s and '30s, and also some legendary singers, like Maria Callas, who came along much later. It was Callas who called Ponselle "the greatest singer of us all," a judgment that stands up strongly even more than 60 years after Ponselle retired from the opera stage.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 22, 2001
Rosa Ponselle, the legendary soprano who died in her adopted Baltimore 20 years ago this week, loved helping young singers get started. She probably would have enjoyed the chance to work with Stefania Dovhan, the promising University of Maryland student who won the 2000 Rosa Ponselle Competition. Dovhan gave a recital Sunday afternoon at the intimate and elegant Gildenhorn Recital Hall in the university's new Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center in College Park, presented by the Rosa Ponselle Foundation.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2001
The Rosa Ponselle Foundation has announced that a series of May concerts and Masses will celebrate the life of Rosa Ponselle, the Metropolitan Opera diva who died 20 years ago this month. At 11:30 a.m. tomorrow at St. Charles Borromeo Roman Catholic Church in Pikesville, a memorial Mass will be offered for Ponselle, whom opera star Luciano Pavarotti called "the Queen of Queens in all of singing." It was in this plain Victorian-era church that Ponselle, who lived in the nearby Greenspring Valley for 40 years, celebrated her faith and enthusiastically joined with the rest of the parishioners in the singing of hymns, her voice soaring above the others.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 15, 2001
Rosa Ponselle, the famed diva who guided the Baltimore Opera Company for several decades, died 20 years ago this month. The Rosa Ponselle Foundation began commemorating that anniversary last weekend with a concert in Washington and a High Mass at the soprano's old parish church in Pikesville; the remembrances continue this week in Baltimore: Stefania Dovhan, who won the gold medal at the 2000 Rosa Ponselle Competition, will give a free recital at 2:30...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | October 15, 2000
LOOKING BACK: It all started with 'Aida,' Rosa Ponselle and a group of dedicated believers. On April 28, 1950, Egyptians and Ethiopians confronted each other in the unlikely confines of the Maryland Casualty Insurance Company building on West 40th Street and Keswick Road. The clash of nationalities, passions and loyalties in the company's auditorium, all sung to the stirring music of Giuseppe Verdi, launched the Baltimore Civic Opera Company and five decades of enriching the city's cultural life.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Teachout and Elizabeth Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 1997
"Rosa Ponselle: A Centenary Biography," by James A. Drake. Amadeus Press. Illustrated. 500 pages. $39.95.Mention Baltimore to your favorite opera lover and you can bet that his look of absolute awe is less likely to be inspired by crabcakes or Cal Ripken than by thoughts of Rosa Ponselle, the dramatic soprano considered by many to have had the most beautiful voice of the century. But tell this same fan that you've read a new biography of her, and watch him shudder.Not a misguided impulse: Most biographies of opera singers are oozing with heady adoration with enough minutiae about vocal technique to put anyone to sleep.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 22, 2001
Rosa Ponselle, the legendary soprano who died in her adopted Baltimore 20 years ago this week, loved helping young singers get started. She probably would have enjoyed the chance to work with Stefania Dovhan, the promising University of Maryland student who won the 2000 Rosa Ponselle Competition. Dovhan gave a recital Sunday afternoon at the intimate and elegant Gildenhorn Recital Hall in the university's new Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center in College Park, presented by the Rosa Ponselle Foundation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | May 20, 2001
Twenty years ago this week -- May 25, 1981--- Rosa Ponselle died in her beloved home, Villa Pace, in Greenspring Valley. The soprano had outlived just about all her fellow stars of the "Golden Age" at the Metropolitan Opera in the 1920s and '30s, and also some legendary singers, like Maria Callas, who came along much later. It was Callas who called Ponselle "the greatest singer of us all," a judgment that stands up strongly even more than 60 years after Ponselle retired from the opera stage.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 15, 2001
Rosa Ponselle, the famed diva who guided the Baltimore Opera Company for several decades, died 20 years ago this month. The Rosa Ponselle Foundation began commemorating that anniversary last weekend with a concert in Washington and a High Mass at the soprano's old parish church in Pikesville; the remembrances continue this week in Baltimore: Stefania Dovhan, who won the gold medal at the 2000 Rosa Ponselle Competition, will give a free recital at 2:30...
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2001
The Rosa Ponselle Foundation has announced that a series of May concerts and Masses will celebrate the life of Rosa Ponselle, the Metropolitan Opera diva who died 20 years ago this month. At 11:30 a.m. tomorrow at St. Charles Borromeo Roman Catholic Church in Pikesville, a memorial Mass will be offered for Ponselle, whom opera star Luciano Pavarotti called "the Queen of Queens in all of singing." It was in this plain Victorian-era church that Ponselle, who lived in the nearby Greenspring Valley for 40 years, celebrated her faith and enthusiastically joined with the rest of the parishioners in the singing of hymns, her voice soaring above the others.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | October 15, 2000
LOOKING BACK: It all started with 'Aida,' Rosa Ponselle and a group of dedicated believers. On April 28, 1950, Egyptians and Ethiopians confronted each other in the unlikely confines of the Maryland Casualty Insurance Company building on West 40th Street and Keswick Road. The clash of nationalities, passions and loyalties in the company's auditorium, all sung to the stirring music of Giuseppe Verdi, launched the Baltimore Civic Opera Company and five decades of enriching the city's cultural life.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 5, 1998
The opera "Carmen," like the drama "Macbeth," has a well-earned reputation as an unlucky vehicle for the actors and singers who dare perform it.Superstitious actors often refer to the Shakespearean drama as simply "the Scottish play," afraid that mentioning its name could somehow summon the demons of misfortune.Writer Judith Green in an article in The Sun last week provided voluminous examples of how "Carmen" may be the musical counterpart of "Macbeth."On opening night of the Baltimore Opera Company's production of "Carmen" at the Lyric Theater several weeks ago, mezzo Irina Mishura fell as her spike heels slid out from under her on the raked stage.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler | September 26, 1997
Luciano Pavarotti praised her as "the Queen of Queens in all of singing." Maria Callas called her "simply the greatest singer of us all." Montserrat Caballe said: "My favorite singer? Rosa Ponselle!"A now legendary superstar, Ponselle, the first truly great American dramatic soprano, would have been 100 years old this year. She'll be remembered and honored in two extraordinary memorial events this weekend -- near her mausoleum in Druid Ridge Cemetery, Pikesville, at 4 p.m. tomorrow, and in a memorial concert at 4 p.m. Sunday in Murphy Auditorium at Morgan State University.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler | September 26, 1997
Luciano Pavarotti praised her as "the Queen of Queens in all of singing." Maria Callas called her "simply the greatest singer of us all." Montserrat Caballe said: "My favorite singer? Rosa Ponselle!"A now legendary superstar, Ponselle, the first truly great American dramatic soprano, would have been 100 years old this year. She'll be remembered and honored in two extraordinary memorial events this weekend -- near her mausoleum in Druid Ridge Cemetery, Pikesville, at 4 p.m. tomorrow, and in a memorial concert at 4 p.m. Sunday in Murphy Auditorium at Morgan State University.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Teachout and Elizabeth Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 1997
"Rosa Ponselle: A Centenary Biography," by James A. Drake. Amadeus Press. Illustrated. 500 pages. $39.95.Mention Baltimore to your favorite opera lover and you can bet that his look of absolute awe is less likely to be inspired by crabcakes or Cal Ripken than by thoughts of Rosa Ponselle, the dramatic soprano considered by many to have had the most beautiful voice of the century. But tell this same fan that you've read a new biography of her, and watch him shudder.Not a misguided impulse: Most biographies of opera singers are oozing with heady adoration with enough minutiae about vocal technique to put anyone to sleep.
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