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Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park

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By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Advocates for Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park in Elkridge have lost the battle over development rights there, but they say the war is not over. They plan to hold a rally at 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13, at the 78-year-old cemetery on U.S. 1 to draw attention to their argument that graves of pets and people there should not be disturbed. "The whole point of the rally is to bring attention to the plight of the cemetery," said Candy Warden, president of the Rosa Bonheur Society. The volunteer group takes care of the nearly 8-acre grounds, resting place for the remains of some 28 people and thousands of animals, including a few four-legged celebrities, including the Baltimore zoo's first elephant and mascot dogs for the former Washington Bullets, among others.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
Carolyn Jacobi's broad-brimmed hat and cape stood out bright red against a gray afternoon recently at Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park in Elkridge, a combined pet and human cemetery, the latest stop in her 18-year national crusade for the buried dead and their loved ones. In a voice ringing with a preacher's passion, she told some three dozen people protesting possible development that she would fight to protect cemeteries "as long as God puts breath in my body, as long as I have a brain.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
Carolyn Jacobi's broad-brimmed hat and cape stood out bright red against a gray afternoon recently at Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park in Elkridge, a combined pet and human cemetery, the latest stop in her 18-year national crusade for the buried dead and their loved ones. In a voice ringing with a preacher's passion, she told some three dozen people protesting possible development that she would fight to protect cemeteries "as long as God puts breath in my body, as long as I have a brain.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Advocates for Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park in Elkridge have lost the battle over development rights there, but they say the war is not over. They plan to hold a rally at 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13, at the 78-year-old cemetery on U.S. 1 to draw attention to their argument that graves of pets and people there should not be disturbed. "The whole point of the rally is to bring attention to the plight of the cemetery," said Candy Warden, president of the Rosa Bonheur Society. The volunteer group takes care of the nearly 8-acre grounds, resting place for the remains of some 28 people and thousands of animals, including a few four-legged celebrities, including the Baltimore zoo's first elephant and mascot dogs for the former Washington Bullets, among others.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
Elizabeth E.W. Kirk has planned to be buried alongside her mother, Beatrice, and her family dogs at the Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park in Elkridge, believed to be one of the world's first pet cemeteries to allow people to be laid to rest with their animal companions. Her name is already set into the grassy turf there, on a bronze plaque with a photograph of her as a young woman snuggled in bed with five dogs. But now the 69-year-old worries that her final resting place may have to be someplace else.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1996
Four containers of pet ashes -- the remains of three dogs and a cat -- haven't made it to the hands of their proper owners, the Howard County Office of Consumer Affairs said yesterday.In recent weeks, the agency has tried to identify pet owners who had their animals cremated at the Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park in Elkridge, said Stephen D. Hannan, administrator of the county's Office of Consumer Affairs.Howard County and 17 other cemetery clients brought criminal and civil charges last week against William A. Green, who owns the facility on U.S. 1, north of Route 103.The legal troubles -- in which Green has been accused of deceptive trade practices and misdemeanor theft -- stem from a five-month investigation by Howard County police and the Office of Consumer Affairs.
NEWS
By Erika D. Peterman and Erika D. Peterman,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1998
Just when it seemed things couldn't get worse for the troubled Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park pet cemetery in Elkridge, a new dilemma has arrived right across the street.Competition.Noah's Garden of Pets, on the property of the sprawling Meadowridge Memorial Park cemetery on Washington Boulevard, is planning to make a splash with its facility, which is being touted in newspaper ads illustrated with animals boarding an ark. Meadowridge plans a summer rededication ceremony and is running burial plot specials "to aid the pet community at this time."
NEWS
By Erika D. Peterman and Erika D. Peterman,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1998
Just when it seemed things couldn't get worse for the troubled Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park pet cemetery in Elkridge, a new problem has arrived right across the street.Competition.Noah's Garden of Pets, on the property of the sprawling Meadowridge Memorial Park cemetery on Washington Boulevard, is planning to make a splash with its facility, currently being touted in newspaper ads illustrated with animals boarding an ark. Meadowridge plans a summer rededication ceremony and is running burial plot specials "to aid the pet community at this time."
NEWS
By From staff reports | February 12, 1997
ANNAPOLIS -- Rank-and-file county police voted narrowly yesterday to keep the Fraternal Order of Police as their bargaining unit, ending a nine-month struggle between that union and the Teamsters.But the Teamsters won a landslide 26-4 victory to represent sheriff's deputies.More than 75 percent of eligible police officers turned out to vote, giving the once-beleaguered FOP a 178-175 victory.BEL AIR -- Harford County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann is seeking citizens' opinion on what should be included in the proposed budget for fiscal year 1998 at a public hearing at 7 p.m. todayat C. Milton Wright High School, 1301 N. Fountain Green Road.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | January 17, 1997
The 16 bereaved pet owners who accuse the owner of Elkridge's Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park pet cemetery of fraud may have to testify again about their complaints. A judge has ruled that there are questions about whether the owner was properly notified about the lawsuit.Circuit Judge James B. Dudley this week nullified the Dec. 23 hearing against William Anthony Green. The ruling means the hearing may have to be repeated.Green, 45, did not attend the "show cause" hearing -- essentially a trial -- and told The Sun afterward he did not know about it.But the Howard County Office of Law has asked the judge to reconsider his decision, saying that Green had been properly notified about the suit, filed by the Howard Office of Consumer Affairs on behalf of the pet owners.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
Elizabeth E.W. Kirk has planned to be buried alongside her mother, Beatrice, and her family dogs at the Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park in Elkridge, believed to be one of the world's first pet cemeteries to allow people to be laid to rest with their animal companions. Her name is already set into the grassy turf there, on a bronze plaque with a photograph of her as a young woman snuggled in bed with five dogs. But now the 69-year-old worries that her final resting place may have to be someplace else.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1997
The 16 bereaved pet owners who accuse the owner of Elkridge's Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park pet cemetery of deceiving them will not have to tell their stories of woe under oath again.Reversing an earlier decision, Circuit Judge James B. Dudley ruled that a Dec. 23 "show cause" hearing -- essentially a trial -- was valid. Dudley had nullified the hearing last week after questions arose over whether cemetery owner William A. Green was properly served with the lawsuit.The hearing concerned a suit filed by the Howard County Office of Consumer Affairs on behalf of the 16 pet owners, who alleged in their court testimony that Green never delivered costly grave markers and gave the pet owners ashes from the wrong animals brought in for cremation.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | November 17, 1991
To the operator of the country's largest and oldest pet cemetery, this small community of rolling hills, a grocery store, family farms and an elementary school is a perfect site for his latest venture, a pet crematory.But to the more than 30 people who poured into the rectory of St. Mary's Lutheran Church for a public hearing on the proposed crematory, the place couldn't be any less perfect."Our concerns are certainly not eliminated," said Sue Rathbone, aBaltimore County elementary school principal and a 12-year resident of the town.
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