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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | August 12, 1992
Every so often an occasion arises that requires some extra indulgences and luxury. A meal that executes this theme does not have to be time consuming. Some of the highest quality ingredients require little adornment and can simply stand on their own.Roquefort, a very noble and creamy, blue-veined cheese, aged only in the caves of Roquefort, France, adds the most elite of flavors to a luscious filet mignon. Because of its extremely creamy texture, it is the best of all blue-veined cheeses for this treatment.
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By Dabney Gough and Dabney Gough,The San Francisco Chronicle | January 21, 2007
The best insurance policy on an ambitious meal boils down to two little words: make ahead. A perfect example is Gnocchi with Roquefort Cream, from cookbook author and TV chef Joanne Weir, host of Joanne Weir's Cooking Class. The dish can be assembled and kept in the refrigerator for up to two days before baking. GNOCCHI WITH ROQUEFORT CREAM Serves 8 1 2/3 cups milk 3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter Salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 1/3 cups all-purpose flour 5 to 6 eggs 2 cups heavy cream 6 ounces Roquefort cheese, crumbled 1 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.
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By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | October 4, 1998
My husband is an aficionado of all blue cheeses. Whether Stilton, Roquefort, Gorgonzola or Saga Blue, he loves the assertive taste of these blue-veined varieties. He also adores lamb chops, ordering them without fail whenever he sees them on a menu. Imagine his delight recently when I offered him a new dish that included both these ingredients.My creation was a last-minute inspiration for a small dinner party. had decided to serve grilled lamb chops as the main course, and while at the market, the idea to top cooked chops with some crumbled Roquefort and sliced, dried figs came to mind.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | March 23, 2000
WITH THE NEW baseball season almost upon us -- and let's hope it's a better one around here than that train wreck of 1999 -- the Orioles should now address the single most important issue facing this franchise. That's right: It's time to get rid of that seventh-inning stretch song. Once and for all, it's time to bury "Thank God I'm a Country Boy." And this time, we should drive a stake through its heart, too. In the past two weeks, I've heard this topic discussed on at least three radio talk shows.
FEATURES
By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,KNIGHT-RIDDER TRIBUNE | April 24, 1996
A fat-warning flag should go up in your mind whenever you see a chicken recipe that calls for 4 tablespoons of butter. But if that recipe also calls for a cup of sour cream and 2 ounces of cheese, a siren should sound, too. Just by reading the ingredients, you can tell the recipe is a fat overload.The original recipe for Carpenter's Tavern Roquefort chicken, made with butter, sour cream and Roquefort or blue cheese, contained a whopping 626 calories and 38.8 grams of fat per serving.The revised recipe, which omits the butter and substitutes nonfat plain yogurt for some of the sour cream, has 335 calories and 9.4 grams of fat per serving.
FEATURES
By Gerald Etter and Gerald Etter,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 4, 1992
"Great Food Without Fuss" (Holt, $25) is a compilation of favorite recipes culled from the kitchens of 70 great cooks, such as Diana Kennedy and Julia Child.The book focuses on dishes that can be made quickly with minimum effort. Authors Frances McCullough, a cookbook editor, and Barbara Witt, a food consultant and former restaurateur, include their own recipes, plus general cooking tips.The structure of the book allows the reader to use it strictly as a recipe collection, or to take suggestions to improvise.
NEWS
By Dabney Gough and Dabney Gough,The San Francisco Chronicle | January 21, 2007
The best insurance policy on an ambitious meal boils down to two little words: make ahead. A perfect example is Gnocchi with Roquefort Cream, from cookbook author and TV chef Joanne Weir, host of Joanne Weir's Cooking Class. The dish can be assembled and kept in the refrigerator for up to two days before baking. GNOCCHI WITH ROQUEFORT CREAM Serves 8 1 2/3 cups milk 3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter Salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 1/3 cups all-purpose flour 5 to 6 eggs 2 cups heavy cream 6 ounces Roquefort cheese, crumbled 1 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | March 23, 2000
WITH THE NEW baseball season almost upon us -- and let's hope it's a better one around here than that train wreck of 1999 -- the Orioles should now address the single most important issue facing this franchise. That's right: It's time to get rid of that seventh-inning stretch song. Once and for all, it's time to bury "Thank God I'm a Country Boy." And this time, we should drive a stake through its heart, too. In the past two weeks, I've heard this topic discussed on at least three radio talk shows.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | February 9, 1992
"The main thing to remember," says P. J. Birosik in "The Burrito Book," "is that the best burrito is a perfect amalgam of sauce (salsa or mole) and "dry" ingredients (meat, beans, grains, etc.) heated (or chilled) to the optimum temperature."While there is no wrong way to make a burrito, she says, "some sure do taste better than others."Here's a selection of recipes that can turn a feast into a fiesta. If you want to simplify, serve a single entree.Pepper steak burrito with Roquefort garnishMakes 12 burritos.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | January 3, 1992
It would be a happy world in which the English ran the pubs and the French the restaurants.The Old Angler's Inn, a circa-1860 stone building which sits beside a twisty road on the outskirts of Washington, has a quintessentially American location; not only is it close to the nation's capital, but it's hard by the historic C&O Canal. Inside, though, it has the soul of an English public house. Not a prole pub filled with dart players and other Andy Capp types, but one of those quaint country hostelries beloved of fox-hunting aristocrats and their hounds.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | October 4, 1998
My husband is an aficionado of all blue cheeses. Whether Stilton, Roquefort, Gorgonzola or Saga Blue, he loves the assertive taste of these blue-veined varieties. He also adores lamb chops, ordering them without fail whenever he sees them on a menu. Imagine his delight recently when I offered him a new dish that included both these ingredients.My creation was a last-minute inspiration for a small dinner party. had decided to serve grilled lamb chops as the main course, and while at the market, the idea to top cooked chops with some crumbled Roquefort and sliced, dried figs came to mind.
FEATURES
By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,KNIGHT-RIDDER TRIBUNE | April 24, 1996
A fat-warning flag should go up in your mind whenever you see a chicken recipe that calls for 4 tablespoons of butter. But if that recipe also calls for a cup of sour cream and 2 ounces of cheese, a siren should sound, too. Just by reading the ingredients, you can tell the recipe is a fat overload.The original recipe for Carpenter's Tavern Roquefort chicken, made with butter, sour cream and Roquefort or blue cheese, contained a whopping 626 calories and 38.8 grams of fat per serving.The revised recipe, which omits the butter and substitutes nonfat plain yogurt for some of the sour cream, has 335 calories and 9.4 grams of fat per serving.
FEATURES
By Gerald Etter and Gerald Etter,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 4, 1992
"Great Food Without Fuss" (Holt, $25) is a compilation of favorite recipes culled from the kitchens of 70 great cooks, such as Diana Kennedy and Julia Child.The book focuses on dishes that can be made quickly with minimum effort. Authors Frances McCullough, a cookbook editor, and Barbara Witt, a food consultant and former restaurateur, include their own recipes, plus general cooking tips.The structure of the book allows the reader to use it strictly as a recipe collection, or to take suggestions to improvise.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | August 12, 1992
Every so often an occasion arises that requires some extra indulgences and luxury. A meal that executes this theme does not have to be time consuming. Some of the highest quality ingredients require little adornment and can simply stand on their own.Roquefort, a very noble and creamy, blue-veined cheese, aged only in the caves of Roquefort, France, adds the most elite of flavors to a luscious filet mignon. Because of its extremely creamy texture, it is the best of all blue-veined cheeses for this treatment.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | February 9, 1992
"The main thing to remember," says P. J. Birosik in "The Burrito Book," "is that the best burrito is a perfect amalgam of sauce (salsa or mole) and "dry" ingredients (meat, beans, grains, etc.) heated (or chilled) to the optimum temperature."While there is no wrong way to make a burrito, she says, "some sure do taste better than others."Here's a selection of recipes that can turn a feast into a fiesta. If you want to simplify, serve a single entree.Pepper steak burrito with Roquefort garnishMakes 12 burritos.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | January 3, 1992
It would be a happy world in which the English ran the pubs and the French the restaurants.The Old Angler's Inn, a circa-1860 stone building which sits beside a twisty road on the outskirts of Washington, has a quintessentially American location; not only is it close to the nation's capital, but it's hard by the historic C&O Canal. Inside, though, it has the soul of an English public house. Not a prole pub filled with dart players and other Andy Capp types, but one of those quaint country hostelries beloved of fox-hunting aristocrats and their hounds.
FEATURES
By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,The Evening Sun The Sun The Sunday Sun | June 1, 1991
Harryman House, 340 Main St., Reisterstown, 833-8850. The Harryman House opened in the '80s with a 200-year-old log cabin at its core. An enclosed porch wraps around two sides of the building, affording diners a pleasant view. The menu offers an interesting selection of seafood, poultry and meat, as well as light fare. Harryman's offers a fixed-price dinner -- served daily from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. -- of soup or salad, entree, dessert and coffee for $17.95. A good deal. $$ 1/2 moderately expensive.
NEWS
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | February 13, 2000
Last winter, during a visit to England's Cotswolds, my husband and I dined in a wonderful old country inn called Buckland Manor. Our dinner there was outstanding, each course a delight. Of all the dishes we sampled, one stood out as the most unusual. It was a warm Stilton souffle served unmolded and garnished with roasted pears drizzled with a walnut dressing. My spouse, a true blue cheese aficionado, could not stop talking about this first course, so I promised to try to reproduce it when we returned home.
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