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By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer United Features Syndicate | December 28, 1993
Rope jumping is a vigorous and demanding exercise. You can run, walk or pedal as slowly as you want, but when you jump rope, you have to spin the rope at least 80 times a minute to keep it taut and untangled. Jumping 80 times a minute is like running a mile in 7 minutes and 20 seconds. Most people can't exercise that intensely.If you're in good shape, you can jump rope in your home without expensive equipment. To fit the rope to your body, place one rope handle under one armpit. Stand on the rope and pull it tight.
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SPORTS
By Louis Krauss and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
On a hot and misty July morning in the woods near Savage, several kids and adults screamed with joy as they flew past treetops on a zip line. There was joy, and probably more than a little fear, in those Tarzan yells. Zooming down the 330-foot-long cable, zip liners, the staff of Terrapin Adventures estimates, can reach speeds of up to 20 mph. In other words, it's far from a typical day at work. Founder and owner Matt Baker, who started Terrapin Adventures six years ago in a woodsy patch of Howard County, said the courses, which combine simple fun with team-building activities, strive for "the 'Aha!
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Baltimore CitiWatch surveillance cameras helped thwart a jail smuggling attempt on Sunday, state corrections officials reported. Early Sunday, state correctional workers monitoring the city's crime cameras posted around the Baltimore City Detention Center downtown watched a trio try to pass a package into the jail using a rope corrections officials said a detainee had sent down outside the institution's walls. Baltimore police swooped in and arrested Perry Davenport, 53, and Sierra Johnson, 28, and charged each with nine criminal counts including possession and attempt to deliver a controlled dangerous substance and conspiracy to deliver a telecommunication device to an inmate.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | June 9, 2014
Wow. Does Maureen Dowd have an amazing job, or what? Not only does the New York Times columnist occupy some of the most exclusive real estate in journalism, she got her editors to pay her way to Denver to score some dope and get high. She sold the junket as a reporting trip. She'd been writing about Colorado's legalization of marijuana and wanted to see how the rollout was going. Makes sense. You don't cover the Super Bowl from your family room TV. But you also don't suit up. And when the rookie doper - called a "noob" in the business - ate her way through an entire marijuana candy bar instead of taking just a bite, she had a really, really bad trip.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | June 12, 1994
Black Lightning, Owen Brown Middle School's 10-member girls' double Dutch jump rope team, has struck, winning a trophy at the state's first double Dutch competition.The bad news is that because some of the seventh-grader team members could not afford the $65 each to advance to the World Double Dutch Invitational Championship, the team will not compete in it Thursday at the University of Maryland College Park. The deadline to register was June 5."That's the unfortunate part of it," said Ameedah Abdullah, the girls' coach.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 20, 1997
I came across the site of someone else's rite of passage the other day. I discovered a rope swing in a relatively remote and surprisingly beautiful forest about an hour's drive from Baltimore.I won't give up its exact location because I don't want to encourage anyone to go there. It's too special a place, not mine to give away. And the rope swing is the most dangerous I've seen since the one I tried in a quarry in 1976. If I give the map coordinates, I'll be tempting kids with too much summer on their hands to risk injury or death, and we've had enough of that already.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 14, 2007
This will be a history of rope. It strikes me that such a history is desperately needed just now. It seems the travesty in Jena, La., has spawned a ghastly trend. Remember how white students at Jena High placed nooses in a tree last year to communicate antipathy toward their African-American classmates? Now it's happening all over. A noose is left for a black workman at a construction site in the Chicago area. In Queens, a woman brandishes a noose to threaten her black neighbors. A noose is left on the door of a black professor at Columbia University.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1996
Howard County police are investigating the death of a 13-year-old Mount Airy boy found hanging Saturday morning behind his home from a horizontal rope used for play.Ryan Burdette, a seventh-grader at Glenwood Middle School, was pronounced dead at 2: 06 a.m. at Frederick Memorial Hospital Saturday, said Sgt. Dave Richards, a Howard police spokesman.An autopsy report was pending yesterday, according to the state medical examiner's office.Police want to see the report because it could help determine the cause of death.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | September 28, 2003
Can I really turn jumping rope, a favorite pastime of my childhood, into a workout? If so, how do I get started? If you can keep it up for 15-20 minutes at a moderate to intense pace, jumping rope is a great full-body cardiovascular workout. It's also inexpensive and will be there for you rain or shine. Start by finding a rope with some heft to it (a beaded one is ideal). Jump lightly, with your elbows in and shoulders relaxed. When done right, jumping rope should be easier on your joints than jogging.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1995
Even now, at old-timers' games, they call him "The Rope." Bob Boyd has been known as The Rope since Orioles spring training in Arizona in 1957, when he kept sending line drives whistling past the ears of coach Luman Harris, who was pitching batting practice."
SPORTS
By Matt Hamilton, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Stephanie Harshman whips the white-wire jump rope around as fast as she can, creating the blurry outline of a full revolution and generating the high-pitched howl of a large gust of wind. It's the double-under, a move that explains itself: two revolutions before her feet hit the floor. Up the stairs and down a long hallway inside of Baltimore's MV Fitness, the gym where Stephanie trains and works as a personal trainer, is a dance studio where she tries another move: the burpee double-under.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Emergency crews rescued a man who was tangled in a rope and trapped at the bottom of the Atkisson Dam in Harford County on Wednesday morning. The man was not in the water of the dam but was suspended above the spillway side on a rope, according to the Joppa-Magnolia Volunteer Fire Company, one of several local responders at the scene. The man was not injured but was taken to a hospital for exposure to the cold. Rescue crews were called by numerous people shortly before 7 a.m. and the fire company said the man had been removed at about 8 a.m. Singer Road, which was closed between Clayton Road and Montrose Way for the rescue, has reopened.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Baltimore CitiWatch surveillance cameras helped thwart a jail smuggling attempt on Sunday, state corrections officials reported. Early Sunday, state correctional workers monitoring the city's crime cameras posted around the Baltimore City Detention Center downtown watched a trio try to pass a package into the jail using a rope corrections officials said a detainee had sent down outside the institution's walls. Baltimore police swooped in and arrested Perry Davenport, 53, and Sierra Johnson, 28, and charged each with nine criminal counts including possession and attempt to deliver a controlled dangerous substance and conspiracy to deliver a telecommunication device to an inmate.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
A man accused of killing his estranged wife had tied up another woman in his Highlandtown home before the killing, according to court records, and the captive told police she chewed through the ropes and escaped after the man showed her his wife's body. Charging documents released Monday allege that Lukasz Szkiluk, a 63-year-old painting contractor, had the other woman - described by police only as his girlfriend - bound in his home when he killed 38-year-old Karolina Derezinska-Szkiluk early Saturday morning in the 200 block of S. Haven St. A relative of the slain Derezinska-Szkiluk said she and Szkiluk had been married for about seven years after she arrived in the country from Poland.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
A technical training exercise for the Howard County Fire and Rescue Services' special operations team to practice high-angle rope rescues will be conducted beneath the bridge that carries Interstate 70 between Howard and Baltimore counties on Wednesday, bringing more than a dozen personnel to the span and shutting one lane to traffic. "During this exercise, firefighters and paramedics will respond to a practice scenario involving a worker who has experienced a medical emergency while conducting an inspection of the bridge," county officials said in a statement.
NEWS
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
On Mondays, Wednesdays and Sundays, a group of women can be found scaling their way up the 40-foot walls of the Earth Treks indoor climbing center in Timonium. The women started climbing for different reasons, but they all have one thing in common: a complete willingness to put their safety into others' hands on a weekly basis. What they do: For about two hours each session, the women meet at the gym and alternate between climbing and spotting for one another. The number of women in the group varies depending on the day. They start out by ensuring the rope is properly latched into the belayer's metal braking device, sometimes called a gris-gris, and then tying the rope with figure-eight and stop knots.
NEWS
By Vikki Valentine and Vikki Valentine,Contributing Writer | June 8, 1995
It's this year's sport. The Junior Olympics has added it. ESPN covers it. Even boys are getting interested.It's "jump roping" -- not the playground variety, but the precision kind. To music. With teams."Jump roping is modern. Jump roping is this year, not the '80s or '70s," said Ilana Carr, 9, of Glenmont near Columbia, after learning this week that she had become an official member of the Kangaroo Kids Precision Jump Rope Team.The internationally known team is made up of 120 Howard County school children, from kindergartners through high school seniors, who double-dutch, speed jump, tumble and, in the words of 10-year-old member Shannon Burton, "jump as high as a kangaroo."
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1994
Deanna Espeut, 12, jumped between the two circling jump-ropes, being careful not to step on them, while rope turner Ave Danzy yelled: "Keep your feet up!"But as soon as her 12-year-old teammate gave the tip, Deanna stepped on the rope, which meant she had to start over again.The girls are members of Black Lightning, an 11-member double Dutch jump-rope club formed in October at Owen Brown Middle School."I used to watch my sister [double Dutch]," said Kendra Walters, of Black Lightning. "It's fun, and something to do for a sport."
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2013
Police in Anne Arundel County arrested a man for choking his uncle at a home in Severn and have charged the man with attempted murder. At approximately 7:33 a.m. on Jan. 12, police responded to a 911 report of a fight involving a man choking his 51-year-old uncle with a rope, according to a statement issued by Anne Arundel police officials. Upon arriving at a residence in the 7900 block of Citadel Drive, police saw the men in the front yard and removed the rope from the victim's neck to allow him to breathe.
ENTERTAINMENT
Janell Sutherland | April 30, 2012
This episode was practically perfect, you guys. I won't spoil it in the first paragraph, but the teams are still in India and I think some bad karma came around to gently nudge a few people. I wouldn't have minded a swift kick to some people's behinds, but the gentle nudge wasn't too bad. The first four teams leave within 45 minutes of each other. Poor JJ has a cold. They head to a temple to receive a traditional blessing from a head priest. Sometimes these brushes with other religions bring out some rude remarks, but not this time, everyone was cool.
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