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By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2009
Question: The roots of my orchid are growing way out of the pot. Should I cut them off? Answer: No, wild flailing roots are business as usual for an orchid. Orchids are epiphytes which grow in tree crotches or wherever they can get purchase in the tree canopy. It's not normal for them to be confined to a pot, consequently potting medium for orchids is primarily shards of bark. When this decomposes it is too much like soil, and the roots are not happy. They may be signaling that it’s time to repot your orchid with new specialized orchid potting "soil."
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NEWS
By Lane Page and For The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
S ince they came out of the forest, our ancestors must have looked up to the skies for warm sunlight and cooling breezes. A few, looking down at natural steam vents and hot springs, found themselves able to take advantage of the earth itself for geothermal heat. Skipping to the present, when renewable energy tax credits, rebates and grants have refueled a serious interest in the underground energy source, this heat pump that uses water instead of air has taken a foothold in Howard County as a result of its long-term financial benefits, even after the demise of a local tax incentive.  Those who've gone with geothermal energy are pleased with their decisions.
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NEWS
By MARIANNE MEANS | August 16, 1995
Washington. -- When President Clinton travels to Ireland this fall, he will be inviting comparison with his political idol, President John F. Kennedy, who also went there in search of his family roots.The similarities between Bill Clinton and Kennedy, however, pretty much end with their mutual Irish heritage.Mr. Clinton's trip is billed as a diplomatic effort to encourage the peace process in Northern Ireland, reinforcing his embarrassingly slender credentials as an active world leader.Sporadic violence recently halted the talks between the British government and Sinn Fein, the political arm of the Irish Republican Army, aimed at settling a guerrilla war that has raged for 25 years.
NEWS
By Matthew Bobrowsky | September 26, 2014
Now that Congress is back from its summer recess, members are considering a number of appropriation bills. Priorities are being weighed, and I hope - given our increasingly technological society - scientific research and science education are high on the list. The development of innovations and new products, particularly in medicine and electronics, depends heavily on scientific research. Besides expanding the sum of human knowledge, federally funded scientific research grows our economy and improves the quality of life for all Americans.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Tree roots are pushing up the blacktop in my driveway. They're either from two beautiful white pines or two equally beautiful American hollies. They were planted by the original owners of our 1931 house. I love these trees and don't want to hurt them but would like to repair the driveway. Any suggestions? Except for a few anchor roots, most tree roots are in the top 12-18 inches of soil. Cutting the roots to repave might kill your trees. Removing the driveway and repaving over existing roots may also disrupt the root system enough to kill the trees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2010
The guys in Good Charlotte might be in their 30s, and many of their fans might be in their early teens, but that doesn't mean Good Charlotte is too old to be cool. "We're not the dads — yet," said guitarist/singer Benji Madden. "We're kind of the older brothers. We can still hang around and be a part of it." That's just what Good Charlotte will be doing on the Bamboozle Road Show, a touring festival, featuring Boys Like Girls and Baltimore punk group All Time Low, among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2011
When G. Love started tossing around ideas for his new album, he found himself revisiting his roots as a young blues lover kicking around Philadelphia. The album, "Fixin' to Die," pays tribute to the raw sound of Delta bluesmen while turning up the volume a bit. The title track, a cover of the Bukka White tune, is recast as a righteous acoustic stomper. Ditto for the cover of the Paul Simon song, "50 Ways to Leave Your Lover. " It sounds like a stretch, but G. Love settles into a comfortable groove and rides it for most of the album.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2011
The Summer Spirit Festival, which was to be headlined by Nas and Damian Marley, has been cancelled. The one-day event was scheduled to take place at Merriweather Post Pavilion August 14.  Common and Erykah Badu performed at the festival last year. This year, Chuck Brown and the Roots had been announced to join Nas and Marley. The festival had been advertised since June. The cancellation was quietly announced a week or two ago, a spokeswoman for Merriweather Post Pavilion said.
NEWS
December 29, 2005
On December 24, 2005, THOMAS ALLEN ROOTS JR; beloved husband of Nina Roots. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Friday, after 8:30 A.M., where family will receive friends from 5 until 7 p.m. Funeral Service will be held on Saturday at the above establishment where family will receive friends at 11:30 A.M. followed by funeral service at 12 noon. See www.marchfh.com
NEWS
October 4, 2006
Ivy Chisley looks at earrings during the Kunta Kinte Heritage Festival at the Anne Arundel County Fairgrounds. At top right, Danielle Edwards, 5, dances on the shoulders of her father, Derrick Edwards, as they enjoy music and wait for food. Below, Jerome Hall of the 9th and 10th U.S. Cavalry Association mans the group's Buffalo Soldiers exhibit. The festival honors Kunta Kinte, an African slave brought to Annapolis in the mid-1700s. An ancestor of author Alex Haley, he was featured prominently in Haley's book Roots.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Maintaining an environmentally friendly landscape at her family's home in Long Reach comes as second nature to Janine Pollack, who loves gardening and the outdoors. The pluses, some obvious and some not, are numerous. They include the inherent adaptability of native plants to the area's climate as well as their ability to attract insects, which attract birds, which attract wildlife. But the primary ecological benefit - which goes undetected by most visitors surveying the natural beauty of Pollack's outdoor canvas - is the ability of strategically placed landscaping to prevent polluted stormwater runoff from spoiling waterways and eventually fouling the Chesapeake Bay. Such benefits, and the principles behind them, will explained to visitors Sept.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
With a six-year difference in age between the oldest and youngest of Larry and Melissa Whiteside's three children, the athletic competition among the siblings was intense growing up in Columbus, Ohio. That was showcased the family's living room, where each of the children a place for their trophies and other mementos marking their achievements. "As soon as Geoffrey was old enough to get trophies, he started counting, 'OK, I've got a few more, so I'm better than you,'" Brittney Whiteside, now 29 and the oldest of the three siblings, recalled earlier this week.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
The roadside root beer stand's orange contours memorialize this venerated shrine to a different era. Its fans make pilgrimages to this Stewart's franchise on Pulaski Highway, a truck-battered stretch of U.S. 40 in eastern Baltimore County, to recall the food experiences of their youth. This is the place where it seemed a little cooler in the days before broiling city neighborhoods such as Highlandtown or Canton had air conditioning. Suburban Rosedale was the summer destination when the sun was bright, the humidity was high and school was a distant notion.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
When federal databases containing sensitive information on U.S. intelligence or nuclear weapons come under cyberattack, the agencies call on major companies like Lockheed Martin, Verizon and Booz Allen Hamilton - as well as a two-year-old startup in Federal Hill - to shore up defenses. Maddrix LLC is among seven companies to be the first ones accredited in a new National Security Agency vetting program. The firms use complex data analysis and digital forensics to root out invaders that are lurking or have left behind tracks during their intrusions.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The root beer float is celebrated every Aug. 6 with its own special food holiday - National Root Beer Float Day. Basically a combination of root beer and vanilla ice cream, the effervescent soda-fountain treat is known in some regions as the black cow. We could go for one right now.  Johnny's   in Roland Park is offering complimentary floats from its menu from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday with a $10 purchase. A&W Restaurants nationwide are giving away free root beer floats from 2 p.m. until closing on Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
The Milton Inn   is running a Lobster, Champagne & Chocolate prix-fixe dinner on Mondays and Tuesdays through September. For $32, guests get a 1-1/2 pound Maine lobster with a choice of two sides from the a la carte menu, along with one glass of Gerard Bertrand Cremant de Limoux Brut and a chocolate truffle. Call 410-771-4366 for reservations. Corner BYOB   in Hampden has a new $25 three-course prix-fixe menu every Monday. On tonight's menu are things like seafood corn bisque, port marinated grilled beef heart, herb-infused lobster and corn risotto, pan-seared trout fillet, and beer-braised pork belly.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to the Sun | March 3, 2007
Would the roots of a 25-foot plum tree go to a depth of 5 feet? A plum tree does not have a notorious root system, one that heaves up sidewalks, for instance. The vast majority of roots of any tree species are found in the top 12 to 18 inches of soil. These feeder roots extend horizontally to the edge of the leaf canopy, or drip line, and beyond up to 1 1/2 times the height of the tree. A few anchoring "sinker" roots grow down several feet to stabilize the tree. It's likely that your plum tree has some roots that extend 5 feet deep.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | February 11, 1992
By the eighth and final night of "Roots," movie theaters in many cities didn't even try to compete. They simply closed their doors.Eighty million viewers watched that last two-hour episode. Its 51.1 rating and 71 Nielsen share were a record that will likely never be matched.Mayors in more than 30 cities declared it "Roots" week.That's the kind of impact "Roots," the TV miniseries based on Alex Haley's book, had for one week in January 1977.In the weeks that followed, debate about the miniseries raged.
NEWS
By Ray McGovern | July 15, 2014
Absent from U.S. media encomia for recently deceased former Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze is any mention of the historic deal he reached with his U.S. counterpart James Baker in 1990 ensuring that the Soviet empire would collapse "with a whimper, not a bang" (Mr. Baker's words). Mr. Baker keeps repeating that the Cold War "could not have ended peacefully without Shevardnadze. " But he and others are silent on the quid pro quo . The quid was Moscow's agreement to swallow the bitter pill of a reunited Germany in NATO; the quo was a U.S. promise not to "leapfrog" NATO over Germany farther East.
NEWS
July 15, 2014
Letter writer Eric Rozenman concludes that the Palestinian "celebration" of the killing of three Israeli teenagers last month is noteworthy because Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu quickly announced his regrets and said the perpetrators would be brought to justice ( "Sun offers false equivalence between Israelis and Palestinians," July 11). Further, Mr. Rozenman concludes that the Arab rejection of a "two-state solution" over the last several years is evidence that the Palestinians would rather engage in conflict than have peace.
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